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Writing & Spelling

Articles within this section cover a broad range of topics, including understanding dysgraphia (a term used to describe difficulty in writing, particularly handwriting), teaching writing skills, and technology resources for writing.

There are 43 articles in this section.

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A Student's Perspective on Writing

Eli, a young boy, tells us what it is like to have dysgraphia. Regina Richards, a well-known expert on dysgraphia (and Eli's mom), explains how to help children who struggle with the challenges Eli describes. Practical techniques discussed include POWER: Prepare, Organize, Write, Edit, Revise.

All Children Can Write

Dysgraphia Accommodations and Modifications

Signs and symptoms of dysgraphia are described. Use the menu of accommodations and modifications to pick the best ones for your students, so they can learn the material without interference by their writing problems. Examples include; let them have more time, simplify the task, allow assistance for part of the task (i.e. a scribe to physically write for a student, give them tools that will help, or change the format). Do not lower your expectations for actual learning. The last section of the article has remediation recommendations to help the student improve their writing and overcome their dysgraphia.

Dysgraphia: More Than Just Bad Handwriting

Teachers and parents should suspect dysgraphia if a child's handwriting is unusually difficult to read. Find out more about this neurological problem that can cause physical pain as some children struggle to write.

Embedded Supports to Differentiate Instruction for Struggling Students

Enhancing the Note-Taking Skills of Students with Mild Disabilities

Five Guidelines for Learning Spelling and Six Ways for Practicing Spelling

Here are some concrete techniques that children can use to study spelling. This article also shares guidelines teachers and students should keep in mind, because practice makes permanent.

From Illegible to Understandable: How Word Prediction and Speech Synthesis Can Help

Handwriting Club: Using Sensory Integration Strategies to Improve Handwriting

Handwriting is a complex skill that is not often taught directly. It is not unusual for some students with disabilities to have difficulty with handwriting. These students may also have sensory integration problems. Handwriting Club is a format that provides direct instruction in handwriting combined with sensory integration activities. This article describes all the steps and materials necessary to organize and conduct a handwriting club.

Helping Students Who Struggle to Write: Classroom Compensations

There are many reasons students hate to write, the primary of which is that writing is a slow and laborious process. The purpose of this article is to provide suggestions to help students, with emphasis on compensations

Helping Your Child to Better Handwriting

Helping Your Young Child With Writing

Engage your child in the writing process. This article includes simple, fun tasks to give your child that involve writing, materials and tools to help, and LD OnLine's answer to the question, "Does spelling count?"

How Spelling Supports Reading

Many young readers are puzzled by the rules and exceptions of spelling. Research shows that learning to spell and learning to read rely on much of the same underlying knowledge. Learn more about the relationships between letters and sounds and how a proper understanding of spelling mechanics can lead to improved reading.

How to Help Your Students Write Well: An Interview with Steve Graham

Three research based practices help students with learning disabilities improve their writing. Read this interview with Steve Graham, author of Writing Next: Effective Strategies to Improve Writing of Adolescents in Middle and High School who explains how you can help your students succeed in communicating through the written word.

Improving the Quality of Student Notes

Much of classroom learning at the secondary and postsecondary levels depends on understanding and retaining information from lectures. In most cases, students are expected to take notes and to review them in preparation for testing of lecture material.

Language-Based Learning Disability: What to Know

Language-based learning disabilities (LBLD) encompass a spectrum of cognitive and behavioral differences in processing, comprehending, and using language. Students with LBLD commonly experience difficulties with listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, math, organization, attention, memory, social skills, perseverance, and self-regulation. However, a teaching style that is specialized and structured enables students with LBLD to succeed. Learn the essential facts about how to foster the strengths of students with LBLD in this article.

Making Presentations with Multimedia

Making Technology Work in the Inclusive Classroom: A Spell CHECKing Strategy for Students with Learning Disabilities

Mechanical Obstacles to Writing: What Can Teachers Do to Help Students with Learning Problems?

Multimedia and More: Help for Students with Learning Disabilities

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