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LD Topics

Teaching & Instruction

Teaching and effective instruction for students with learning disabilities requires specialized knowledge in the areas of spoken language, reading, writing, and math. This section contains readings that reflect knowledge of best practices and evidence based instruction within each area.

There are 197 articles in this section.

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Executive Function: Activation Routines

Cognitive Load Theory

John Sweller’s Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) supports the idea that students can learn only if their mental capacity is not overloaded. In consideration of this theory, it is important to be aware of the amount of information a student is asked to learn.

Executive Function: Addressing Emotion through Communication

Students' emotional responses to challenging situations can influence their concentration, perseverance, application of learned skills, and interactions with others. Even with safe and supportive classroom environments, students often have difficulty because they lack the communication skills to address challenging situations.

Understanding and Addressing Processing Speed Deficits in the Classroom

School Leadership Teams for Technology Implementation

The goal of a sustained, school-wide technology implementation program is to meet the needs of all students. It takes a School Leadership Team to meet this goal.

Approaches to Technology Implementation

Free Tech Tools to Support the Science and Math Connection

Blended Professional Development: Assessing Needs

The first article in our series on blended professional development (PD) provided an overview, drawing on the exciting resources and information available at PowerUp What Works. Taking the next step, here you will learn about ways to access the needs of your intended audience for blended PD which might include general and special education teachers, school administrators, specialists, and other staff.

A well-designed needs assessment will allow you to identify more specific objectives aligned to the short- and long- term goals of your district or school. What is the source of those goals? Are they aligned with the Common Core Standards, College and Career Readiness Standards, those of your state or local school district?

Clarity about overarching goals helps set the context for determining specific PD objectives in English Language Arts (reading, writing, listening, and speaking), mathematics, science, social studies, history, technology, and/or vocational skills.

Meeting Professional Development Needs Through Blended Professional Development

It's a given that high-quality, ongoing, and student-focused professional development (PD) is key to improving teaching and learning. But questions about time, adult learning needs, relevancy, and technology integration plague PD coordinators, team leaders, coaches, district and school administrators, and consultants. Recently, a growing number of schools are finding answers to these compelling questions by exploring, designing, and conducting blended PD.

Conducting Research

The ability to conduct research is a critical skill that all students need to be college and career ready. Across the country, it is common for students from the elementary grades through high school to be required to carry out a research project in English Language Arts (ELA), social studies, history, or science.

Self-Questioning to Support Reading Comprehension

Using Visual Representations in Mathematics

Summarizing to Understand Text

Making Presentations with Multimedia

Visualizing to Make Meaning

By incorporating differentiated models, practicing visualization, and supporting your students as they visualize (drawing on principles for Universal Design for Learning), you can help your students learn to use all of their senses to engage with and imagine the world of a text, and to bring that world to life as they read.

"Learning Disabilities" Movement Turns 50

Fifty years ago, the learning disabilities (LD) advocacy movement began. This article by Landmark College education professor Dr. Jim Baucom explores the history of the movement and future directions. The article originally appeared on the Washington Post web site on April 12th, 2013.

Language-Based Learning Disability: What to Know

Language-based learning disabilities (LBLD) encompass a spectrum of cognitive and behavioral differences in processing, comprehending, and using language. Students with LBLD commonly experience difficulties with listening, speaking, reading, writing, spelling, math, organization, attention, memory, social skills, perseverance, and self-regulation. However, a teaching style that is specialized and structured enables students with LBLD to succeed. Learn the essential facts about how to foster the strengths of students with LBLD in this article.

Facilitating Success for Students with Language-Based Learning Disabilities

For students with learning disabilities (LD), a sense of competence and ability (also known as self-efficacy) plays a vital role in their social and emotional development as well as academic achievement. Discover how educators can adapt their teaching style to support social and emotional development (including self-efficacy) in students with language-based LD.

Patterns and Categorizing

Children begin using their senses to recognize patterns and categorize things at a young age — skills that play an important role in early learning. This tip sheet provides some simple activities, as well as recommended books, that parents can use to help their kids build pattern recognition and categorization skills in science and math.

Top 10 Resources on Fluency

Learn about fluency assessment, the importance of fluency in building comprehension skills, finding the right book level for kids, effective classroom strategies like reader's theater and choral reading, and more.

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