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Teaching & Instruction

Teaching and effective instruction for students with learning disabilities requires specialized knowledge in the areas of spoken language, reading, writing, and math. This section contains readings that reflect knowledge of best practices and evidence based instruction within each area.

There are 182 articles in this section.

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Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities: Perceptions of a First-Year Teacher

We report the perceptions of a first-year teacher of students with learning disabilities. The teacher describes her first-year challenges and successes; presents her views on assessment, accountability, and inclusion; and makes recommendations for new teachers entering the field. In addition, she suggests steps that teacher educators, school administrators, and experienced teachers can take to ensure the success of first-year teachers. We conclude with observations on teacher retention, first-year teaching experiences, and teacher-education programs.

Teaching Time Management to Students with Learning Disabilities

Teach your students how to improve their time management. Learn to teach task analysis, enabling your students to divide academic projects into smaller tasks, figure out how long each task will take, and produce their work when it needs to be done.

Teaching Vocabulary

Consider some excellent lesson models for teaching vocabulary, explaining idioms, fostering word consciousness, instruction for English Language Learners, and mnemonic strategies.

Tech Tools for Students with Learning Disabilities: Infusion into Inclusive Classrooms

Technology-Supported Math Instruction for Students with Disabilities: Two Decades of Research and Development

The "Culture" of Inclusion

The Arts: Windows to Strength for Individuals with Learning Disabilities

The Clarifying Routine: Elaborating Vocabulary Instruction

The more a new vocabulary word is associated with ideas from students' own experience, the more likely the word will become well 'networked' and a permanent part of memory. Making these links involves elaborating definitions of new terms. This article offers teachers several ways to facilitate elaboration.

The Impact of Teachers: A Story of Indelible Memories and Self-Esteem

The Importance of Music, Art

Three- to five-year-olds are exuberant little learners, as they make new discoveries and acquire new skills and competencies every day. As discussed in the section "What Are Learning Styles?" children learn best when they experience through all their senses – hearing, seeing, touching, feeling, moving, smelling.

The Social Face of Inclusive Education: Are Students with Learning Disabilities Really Included in the Classroom?

The movement toward inclusion of students with disabilities into general education classes has become the overwhelming trend in education (Chow & Kasari, 1999; Mamlin, 1999). Not only does inclusive education for children with disabilities bring improved academic functioning (Manset & Semmel, 1997; Sideridis et al., 1997), but it also offers them the opportunity for socialization with their peers without disabilities in general education classrooms (Giangreco, Dennis, Cloninger, Edelman, & Shattman, 1993; National Center for Educational Restructuring and Inclusion, 1994).

The Teacher's Role in Home/School Communication: Everybody Wins

Rick Lavoie provides 21 tips for teachers on how to improve parent/school communication.

The Writing Road: Reinvigorate Your Students' Enthusiasm for Writing

Teach your students to avoid the avoidance of writing. Learn how to lead them down the path of enthusiasm and self-confidence about writing through research-proven strategies.

Thinking About Inclusion and Learning Disabilities:
A Teacher's Guide

Thinking with Language, Images, and Strategies

Top 10 Resources on Fluency

Learn about fluency assessment, the importance of fluency in building comprehension skills, finding the right book level for kids, effective classroom strategies like reader's theater and choral reading, and more.

Trastornos del Procesamiento Auditivo en los Niños: ¿Qué Significa?

El procesamiento auditivo es el término usado para describir lo que sucede cuando el cerebro reconoce e interpreta los sonidos a su alrededor. Los seres humanos oyen cuando la energía, que reconocemos como sonido, se desplaza a través del oído y se transforma en información eléctrica que puede ser interpretada por el cerebro. El término "desorden" en el desorden del procesamiento auditivo (APD, por su sigla en inglés) significa que algo está perjudicando el procesamiento o la interpretación de la información.

Two Student Success Stories

Special education students need to be convinced often of their capabilities and need to try out new skills with the benefit of a safety net. The greater their belief in the likelihood of their success, the greater their effort is likely to be. That increased effort generally will result in greater success, leading to greater effort. Once that cycle can be established, student achievement is more likely guaranteed. Following are two of the student success stories from this year.

Understanding Why Students Avoid Writing

If parents and teachers understand why some students hate writing , they can targeted solution to address students' reluctance. Learn some reasons students avoid writing, and how increasing the automaticity of writing skills and underscoring an appreciation for the purpose of writing can help.

Using Children's Literature to Teach Social Skills

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