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Teaching & Instruction

Teaching and effective instruction for students with learning disabilities requires specialized knowledge in the areas of spoken language, reading, writing, and math. This section contains readings that reflect knowledge of best practices and evidence based instruction within each area.

There are 182 articles in this section.

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Using Cooperative Learning to Teach Mathematics to Students with Learning Disabilities

"Cooperative learning" (i.e., jigsaw, learning together, group investigation, student teams-achievement divisions, and teams-games-tournaments) is a generic term that is used to describe an instructional arrangement for teaching academic and collaborative skills to small, heterogeneous groups of students.

Using Functional Analysis to Improve Reading Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities and Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

Using Mnemonic Instruction to Facilitate Access to the General Education Curriculum

Learn about mnemonic instruction, a technique that researchers say has solid effectiveness for individuals with learning disabilities. Review three important strategies, key words, peg words, and letters. Specific examples will help you use it with students or apply it to yourself.

Vickie A. McCrary - Mentor Teacher

We all get sent in odd directions at some point in our lives - directions that seem to make no sense. As a single mother of two, I was forced to sell my screen printing business and seek a new direction for my life. With two years of college under my belt, I decided to return to school and earn my teaching degree in art.

Watering Up the Curriculum for Adolescents with Learning Disabilities, Part I: Goals of the Knowledge Dimension

Many accommodations, though designed to ensure success of adolescents with learning disabilities in content area classes, water down the curriculum by reducing opportunities to learn and emphasizing memorization of facts. This article explores how watering up the curriculum to create "thought-full" classrooms can facilitate achievement of learning and development of deep knowledge structures.

Watering Up the Curriculum for Adolescents with Learning Disabilities, Part II: Goals of the Affective Dimension

This article addresses issues associated with common pedagogical practices that impede effective development of adolescents with learning disabilities. It also outlines goals, principles, and techniques for "watering up" curriculum and instruction so that intrinsic motivation, internal locus of control, academic and social self-concept, self-esteem, a sense of competence and confidence, an "attack" attitude about challenging tasks, willingness to take risks, and sense of personal potency are fostered.

We've Been Waiting For This Moment... Are We Ready?

What Happens When Assistive Technology Doesn’t Work?: The Need for an Integrated Approach.

When the student technology match has not worked, what key questions should be asked?

What Happens When Students Use Text-to-Speech and Word Predict Programs to Compose Text?

What is Art Therapy?

Art therapy is a psychotherapeutic discipline that utilizes plastic and graphic art expression as a means of facilitating the expression of thoughts and feelings that an individual may be unable or unwilling to verbalize.

What Is Dysgraphia?

Dysgraphia is a learning disability that affects writing abilities. Learn the warning signs and strategies that can help. There are techniques for teaching and accommodating early writers, young students, or help yourself if you struggle with dysgraphia.

What Is Executive Functioning?

The term "executive functioning" has become a common buzzword in schools and psychology offices. This is more than just a passing fad. Find out what executive function is, and what specific abilities are covered under the umbrella term of executive functioning.

What is Responsiveness to Intervention?

This brief was developed by National Research Center for Learning Disabilities to help you understand responsiveness to intervention (also known as response to intervention), an education model that promotes early identification of students who may be at risk for learning difficulties and learning disabilities.

What Makes a Good Teacher

What Makes a Great Teacher for Students with LD: Introducing the Hybrid Teacher

A nueropsychologist and former middle special education teacher lists the qualities of an ideal teacher for kids with learning disabilities. "I am optimistic," he says, "for I have been to the classroom (hundreds of them, in fact) and there is light."

What Science Offers Teachers of Reading

What Teachers Should Know

The child who repeatedly disrupts your class and who seldom completes assignments may not be deliberately troublesome, but could be showing signs of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Similarly, a student who constantly stares out of the window might not be intentionally ignoring you, but instead could be demonstrating behavior caused by ADD.

When Older Students Can't Read

Both students and educators become frustrated when students beyond 3rd grade display reading difficulties. These research-based reading strategies can build a foundation for reading success in students of all ages.

Whole Language Lives On: The Illusion of Balanced Reading Instruction

Work More Effectively with Your Paraeducator

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