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Reading & Dyslexia

Approximately 80 percent of students with learning disabilities have been described as reading disabled. Resources within this section provide information and advice on what you can do to help students with LD gain reading skills.

There are 97 articles in this section.

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Reading Software: Finding the Right Program

With the range and variety of commercial software products on the shelves today, how can an educator or parent choose a program that will most benefit a particular student? Where are product reviews that can inform the decision?

Remediation Training Improves Reading Ability of Dyslexic Children

For the first time, researchers have shown that the brains of dyslexic children can be rewired -- after undergoing intensive remediation training -- to function more like those found in normal readers.

Researchers Urge Officials to Reject Reading Recovery

RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell

RTI is not a particular method or instructional approach, rather it is a process that aims to shift educational resources toward the delivery and evaluation of instruction that works best for students. This article provides a quick overview of RTI as it relates to reading.

Screening, Diagnosing, and Progress Monitoring for Fluency: The Details

Screening, diagnosing, and progress monitoring are essential to making sure that all students become fluent readers — and the words-correct per-minute (WCPM) procedure can work for all three. Here's how teachers can use it to make well-informed and timely decisions about the instructional needs of their students.

Self-Questioning to Support Reading Comprehension

Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia

Dyslexia is not an emotional disorder, but the frustrating nature of this learning disability can lead to feelings of anxiety, anger, low self–esteem and depression. Read scenarios in the dyslexic child's life that can give rise to social and emotional difficulties. Discover how to help children deal successfully with these challenges.

Straight Talk About Reading: How Parents Can Make a Difference During the Early Years

Strategies for Summer Reading for Children with Dyslexia

Here are a dozen simple strategies to help your children keep the academic skills they learned during the school year. Support them as they read. Give them material that is motivating — and some of it should be easy. Help them enjoy books and feel pleasure — not pressure — from reading. The summer should be a relaxed time where their love of learning can flower.

Strategies That Work for Students Grade 9 to 12 with Dyslexia

Summarizing to Understand Text

Summer Learning Loss: The Problem and Some Solutions

An over

Summertime and the Learning Is Easy

The summer is a time to unwind and relax for parents and kids alike, but learning should not come to a halt. By focusing on your child's interests, involving the family, and setting goals, you can motivate even the most reluctant learners

Supplemental Instruction in Decoding Skills for Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Students in Early Elementary School: A Follow-up

Supporting Reading in Social Studies

Talking to Children About LD

A psychologist specializing in language-based learning disabilities explains how to talk to children about their LD: All the parts you need to be smart are in your brain. Nothing is missing or broken. The difference between your brain and one that doesn't have an LD is that your brain gets "traffic jams" on certain highways.

Teachers: The Key to Helping America Read

Teaching Vocabulary

Consider some excellent lesson models for teaching vocabulary, explaining idioms, fostering word consciousness, instruction for English Language Learners, and mnemonic strategies.

The Abilities of Those with Reading Disabilities: Focusing on the Talents of People with Dyslexia

Thomas West builds a case for the scientific study of gifts and talents thought to be associated with dyslexia. Such research would supplement the current research on correcting deficits, by discovering ways to maximize talents to overcome these deficits.

The Clarifying Routine: Elaborating Vocabulary Instruction

The more a new vocabulary word is associated with ideas from students' own experience, the more likely the word will become well 'networked' and a permanent part of memory. Making these links involves elaborating definitions of new terms. This article offers teachers several ways to facilitate elaboration.

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