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Reading & Dyslexia

Approximately 80 percent of students with learning disabilities have been described as reading disabled. Resources within this section provide information and advice on what parents and educators can do to help students with LD gain reading skills.

There are 95 articles in this section.

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Is It a Reading Disorder or Developmental Lag?

How do parents know if their child's reading delay is a real problem or simply a "developmental lag?" How long should parents wait before seeking help if their child is struggling with reading? Susan Hall answers these questions.

Dyslexia and High School

An expert shares her observations of a dyslexic student struggling to learn at school. Also included are numerous proven examples of differentiated instruction and accommodations that can help a student to succeed.

Adolescent Literacy and Older Students with Learning Disabilities

This report describes the adolescent literacy problem (grades 4 to 12), its consequences, and contributing factors. Guiding principles for assessment, instruction, and professional development, as well as recommendations for short-term and future consideration, are also addressed.

At Risk Students and the Study of Foreign Language in Schools

Studying a foreign language can be especially challenging for kids with oral and/or written language learning disabilities. The International Dyslexia Association looks at the kinds of problems students with both moderate and severe LD might manifest in foreign language classes, and lists some approaches teachers can employ to assist these learners.

Dyslexia

This article describes the basic facts about dyslexia, a learning disability that most commonly affects reading, spelling, and writing.

Helping Children with Learning Disabilities Understand What They Read

This article presents a variety of memory strategies. As parents, we need to pay attention to our child's reaction to the strategies and help our child select and use strategies that are comfortable and most closely match his or her preferred learning style.

Dyslexia Basics

Do you think your child or student might have dyslexia? "Dyslexia Basics," a factsheet by International Dyslexia Association," tells you the definition, symptoms, causes and effects. Find out how to help.

Strategies for Summer Reading for Children with Dyslexia

Here are a dozen simple strategies to help your children keep the academic skills they learned during the school year. Support them as they read. Give them material that is motivating — and some of it should be easy. Help them enjoy books and feel pleasure — not pressure — from reading. The summer should be a relaxed time where their love of learning can flower.

Dyslexia and the Brain: What Does Current Research Tell Us?

The identification of a child with dyslexia is a difficult process, but there are ways that parents and teachers can learn more about the reading difficulty and support the child's learning.

Dyslexic Parents of Dyslexic Children

Dyslexic parents talk about what it is like to have children with dyslexia. They speak of both the blessings and challenges.

Screening, Diagnosing, and Progress Monitoring for Fluency: The Details

Screening, diagnosing, and progress monitoring are essential to making sure that all students become fluent readers — and the words-correct per-minute (WCPM) procedure can work for all three. Here's how teachers can use it to make well-informed and timely decisions about the instructional needs of their students.

Enhancing Outcomes for Struggling Adolescent Readers

With so much required of high schools today, there is little time or money to spend on the students who lack basic skills. This article presents important factors leading to success for struggling adolescent readers, taken from successful reading programs.

These Tips Might Make Your Son a Reader

Boys may encounter stereotypes that make developing a life-long love of reading more difficult. This article examines those negative perceptions, and gives parents a list of concrete suggestions to combat stereotyping.

Dissecting Dyslexia

Genetic differences in the brain make learning to read a struggle for children with dyslexia. Luckily, most of our brain development occurs after we're born, when we interact with our environment. This means that the right teaching techniques can actually re-train the brain, especially when they happen early.

Teaching Vocabulary

Consider some excellent lesson models for teaching vocabulary, explaining idioms, fostering word consciousness, instruction for English Language Learners, and mnemonic strategies.

Adolescent Literacy: Where We Are - Where We Need to Go

A majority of federal funding for intervention programs is allocated to elementary schools, but happens when students still struggle in middle and high school? This article investigates why some adolescent readers need more assistance, and what should be done to help them.

Reading Failure

How Spelling Supports Reading

Many young readers are puzzled by the rules and exceptions of spelling. Research shows that learning to spell and learning to read rely on much of the same underlying knowledge. Learn more about the relationships between letters and sounds and how a proper understanding of spelling mechanics can lead to improved reading.

RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell

RTI is not a particular method or instructional approach, rather it is a process that aims to shift educational resources toward the delivery and evaluation of instruction that works best for students. This article provides a quick overview of RTI as it relates to reading.

Components of Effective Reading Instruction

There is no single “best” program for teaching reading. However, scientific investigators agree about the need for instruction to address certain key abilities involved in learning to read.

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