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Reading & Dyslexia

Approximately 80 percent of students with learning disabilities have been described as reading disabled. Resources within this section provide information and advice on what you can do to help students with LD gain reading skills.

There are 102 articles in this section.

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Dissecting Dyslexia

Genetic differences in the brain make learning to read a struggle for children with dyslexia. Luckily, most of our brain development occurs after we're born, when we interact with our environment. This means that the right teaching techniques can actually re-train the brain, especially when they happen early.

Teaching Vocabulary

Consider some excellent lesson models for teaching vocabulary, explaining idioms, fostering word consciousness, instruction for English Language Learners, and mnemonic strategies.

Adolescent Literacy: Where We Are - Where We Need to Go

A majority of federal funding for intervention programs is allocated to elementary schools, but happens when students still struggle in middle and high school? This article investigates why some adolescent readers need more assistance, and what should be done to help them.

Reading Failure

How Spelling Supports Reading

Many young readers are puzzled by the rules and exceptions of spelling. Research shows that learning to spell and learning to read rely on much of the same underlying knowledge. Learn more about the relationships between letters and sounds and how a proper understanding of spelling mechanics can lead to improved reading.

RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell

RTI is not a particular method or instructional approach, rather it is a process that aims to shift educational resources toward the delivery and evaluation of instruction that works best for students. This article provides a quick overview of RTI as it relates to reading.

Components of Effective Reading Instruction

There is no single “best” program for teaching reading. However, scientific investigators agree about the need for instruction to address certain key abilities involved in learning to read.

Independent Reading

Suggestions for fostering independent reading include: (a) Give children books that are not too difficult. (b) Help them find books they will enjoy. (c) Encourage them to try many kinds of material. Although independent reading cannot substitute for teaching decoding, it improves reading comprehension and the habit of reading.

About Reading Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, and Reading Difficulties

Reading difficulties likely occur on a continuum, meaning that there is a wide range of students who experience reading difficulties. There are those students who are diagnosed with a learning disability. There is also an even larger group of students who do not have diagnoses but who need targeted reading assistance.

The World's Greatest Underachiever

Actor and author Henry Winkler reminisces about how dyslexia impacted his school years in this article from Highlights for Children magazine. "Now I know," he writes, "that even if a person learns differently, he or she can still be filled with greatness."

Clues to Dyslexia from Second Grade On

The specific signs of dyslexia, both weaknesses and strengths, vary widely. Problems with oral language, decoding, fluency, spelling, and handwriting are addressed, as well as strengths in higher order thinking skills.

Clues to Dyslexia in Early Childhood

The earliest clues involve mostly spoken language. The very first clue to a language (and reading) problem may be delayed language. Once the child begins to speak, look for difficulties with rhyming, phonemic awareness, and the ability to read common one-syllable words.

Clues to Dyslexia in Young Adults and Adults

Learn about how the specific signs of dyslexia, both weaknesses and strengths, in any one individual will vary according to the age and educational level of that person.

Waiting Rarely Works: Late Bloomers Usually Just Wilt

A look at three pivotal longitudinal studies that clearly show: Late bloomers are rare; skill deficits are almost always what prevent children from blooming as readers.

Dyslexia: Beyond the Myth

This article describes the most common characterists of dyslexia and other learning disorders, and what you can do if you suspect your child has a problem.

Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia

Dyslexia is not an emotional disorder, but the frustrating nature of this learning disability can lead to feelings of anxiety, anger, low self–esteem and depression. Read scenarios in the dyslexic child's life that can give rise to social and emotional difficulties. Discover how to help children deal successfully with these challenges.

Learning Strategies

Dyslexia: What Brain Research Reveals About Reading

We've Been Waiting For This Moment... Are We Ready?

Interview with Author Mark Smith

Mark Smith wrote from his experiences parenting a son with ADHD. "When we were reading everything we could find about the disorder, we were disappointed not to find more books from a child's point of view that showed other children in the same situation, a book to reassure kids that they aren't the only one this is happening to. That's why I wrote Pay Attention, Slosh!"

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