tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

LD Topics

Reading & Dyslexia

Approximately 80 percent of students with learning disabilities have been described as reading disabled. Resources within this section provide information and advice on what parents and educators can do to help students with LD gain reading skills.

There are 87 articles in this section.

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   >   >|

Sort by: | Date | Title |

Reading Fluency

Reading fluency encompasses the speed or rate of reading, as well as the ability to read materials with expression. Learn more about fluency and the best ways to help readers become fluent.

Literacy for All is a Noble Goal: The Significant Interaction of Learner History and Teacher Style

Instructional Grouping for Reading for Students with LD: Implications for Practice

Teachers' grouping practices during reading instruction can serve as a critical component in facilitating effective implementation of reading instruction and inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classes. In this article, we provide an overview of the recent research on grouping practices (whole class, small group, pairs, one-on-one) during reading instruction for students with disabilities.

What Science Offers Teachers of Reading

The Abilities of Those with Reading Disabilities: Focusing on the Talents of People with Dyslexia

Thomas West builds a case for the scientific study of gifts and talents thought to be associated with dyslexia. Such research would supplement the current research on correcting deficits, by discovering ways to maximize talents to overcome these deficits.

Celebrating Strengths and Talents of Children with Dyslexia: An Educational Model

Though children with dyslexia experience difficulties in processing the written language, they are often bright, creative, and talented individuals. Strengths may include mechanical aptitude, artistic ability, musical gifts, and athletic prowess. The dyslexic student may also evidence advanced social skills as well as talents in computer/technology, science, and math.

Why Reading Is Not a Natural Process

Whole Language Lives On: The Illusion of Balanced Reading Instruction

Children with LD as Emergent Readers: Bridging the Gap to Conventional Reading

For children at risk for reading failure, teachers can facilitate the exploration of emergent literacy elements, including phonological awareness, print awareness, narrative development, and early writing skills. This article provides specific activities and instructional techniques to help children develop emergent literacy elements.

General Information About Dyslexia

Phonics and Word Recognition Instruction in Early Reading Programs: Guidelines for Accessibility

Many teachers will be using supplemental phonics and word-recognition materials to enhance reading instruction for their students. In this article, the authors provide guidelines for determining the accessibility of these phonics and word recognition programs.

Beginning Reading

Phonological Awareness: Instructional and Assessment Guidelines

How Children Learn to Read

Using Children's Literature to Teach Social Skills

Straight Talk About Reading: How Parents Can Make a Difference During the Early Years

Why Children Succeed or Fail at Reading

About 10 million children have difficulties learning to read. Children with reading difficulties stop and start frequently, mispronouncing some words and skipping others entirely. In the later grades, when children switch from learning to read to reading to learn, reading-impaired children are kept from exploring science, history, literature, mathematics and the wealth of information that is presented in print.

Biological Basis for Reading Disability Discovered

Why Johnny Can't Decode

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   >   >|