tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

LD Topics

Parenting & Family

Parenting a child with a learning disability can be challenging. We’ve gathered information to help you get organized, understand your rights and responsibilities, and provide support for your child at home and at school.

There are 139 articles in this section.

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   >   >|

Sort by: | Date | Title |

Criando Estudiantes de Postsecundaria con Discapacidades: Convirtiéndose en el Mentor, Abogado* y Guía que su Hijo Necesita

Crickets, Books, and Bach: Develop a Summer Listening Program

Put together a summer listening program for your child. Listening is an engaging way to learn, so your child may love listening to books and other written documents. Have them listen to music and stage plays, comedy routines, and other works. Point out background sounds, such as the way the peppy tune on a sound track adds fun and humor to an adventure tale. Learning to listen is particularly helpful to children with learning disabilities.

Dealing with Learning Disabilities in Relationships

Designing a Dossier: An Instruction Book for Your Child

Many of the adults in your child's life are unfamiliar with learning disorders in general, or your child's unique pattern of strengths and limitations. Developing a one- to three-page dossier that provides useful information about your child can help their babysitters, coaches, teachers, bus drivers, school support staff, neighbors, and relatives understand their limitations. This article describes key elements of such a document and provides a sample.

Divorce: It Can Complicate Children's Special Education Issues

Divorce is never easy, and it can be especially complicated for families also navigating special education services. This article examines who can make educational decisions for a child after a divorce, as well as how sole or joint legal and/or physical custody impact IEP meetings and IDEA due process rights. Answers to some specific questions from divorcing parents are also presented.

Documenting Communication with the School About Special Services

When dealing with a bureaucracy, and school districts are bureaucracies, you need to keep detailed records. Logs, journals, and calendars provide answers and support memories and testimonies. This article provides examples of how to keep a paper trail.

Dyslexic Parents of Dyslexic Children

Dyslexic parents talk about what it is like to have children with dyslexia. They speak of both the blessings and challenges.

Early Identification - Adaptive Milestones

Early Identification - Cognitive Milestones

Early Identification - Motor Skills Milestones

Early Identification - Social Skills Milestones

Environmental Modification of APD at Home

Evaluation: What Does it Mean for Your Child

This PACER Center fact sheet informs parents about evaluation, a process to help determine whether a child has a disability and what the child's educational needs might be. The article discusses the reasons why parents might choose to evaluate their child, types of tests available, factors that should be considered when selecting tests, and questions parents should ask when an evaluation is proposed.

Explaining Learning Disabilities to Your Child

Talking to your child about their learning disabilities is crucial. Rick Lavoie explains how parents can dispel misconceptions, highlight the child's support systems, and provide on going encouragement that will help their child flourish.

Family Matters: The Impact of Learning Disabilities

Fatherhood and ADHD

Fighting For Your Child

Having seen her older son struggle for years, Jennifer Simpson was able to recognize her daughter�s reading challenges in preschool and get her help right away.

Finding Happiness in Your Child

This essay looks at how recasting your thinking about happiness — from an external "goals achieved" view to an internal "happiness received" view — can help parents and children find joy in everyday achievements.

Get Your Child Ready for Work

How can you help your child develop a strong work ethic and job skills? Teach them to take pride in a well-done task. Make them a productive part of your home. Help them remediate their learning disabilities and do well in school. Guide them as they determine and develop their strengths.

Getting the Most Out of Tutoring

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   >   >|