tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

LD Topics

Working with Families

Parenting a child with a learning disability can be challenging. We've gathered information that educators can share with parents to help them provide the best support for their child at home and at school.

There are 139 articles in this section.

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   >   >|

Sort by: | Date | Title |

Goal Setting for Children with Learning Disabilities: Your Role Is Important

The ability to set goals and meet them is essential for success of people with learning disabilities. Learn how to help children set goals, persevere toward those goals, and succeed in making their dreams come true.

Help Your Child Choose a Career and Find a Job

Helping Children with Learning Disabilities and/or ADHD Cope with Tragedies

It is hard to know what to say to children about the tragic events and crisis of September 11, 2001. This event has brought feelings of fear, sadness, and horror to Americans and to our children. It is impossible to shield children from such events. It is not easy to know what to say to children in times like these.

Helping Students with LD Pass High-Stakes Tests

Students must pass a high stakes tests to graduate high school. These tests are a major barrier for students with learning disabilities who often do not test well. Accommodations can help. Learn how to help children with learning disabilities do well on these tests.

Helping Young Children with Learning Disabilities at Home

Helping Your Child with Organization and Study Skills

Just as a carpenter needs the right tools (such as a saw and hammer) and basic skills (such as how to measure and cut wood) to frame a house, students need the right tools (such as notebooks and assignment pads) and basic study skills (such as reading and note-taking skills) to be successful in school.

Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner

In the first chapter of her book, Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner, Kathy Kuhl explains how she came to the realization that school wasn't working for her son and decided to do what she never thought she could: stay home and teach him.

How Parents Can Be Advocates for Their Children

Parents are often the best educational advocates for their children, especially children with a learning disability. The Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities (CCLD) has developed the following tips to help parents champion their child.

How to Have a Good Relationship with Your Child's Teacher

The classroom teacher is the single most important person affecting your child's education. The teacher has tremendous influence on your child's happiness at school and is the person that spends one-on-one time your child on a daily basis. It is extremely important for parents and teachers to work together to provide a good school experience for each child.

How to Maximize Fathers' Involvement with Their Children Who Have Disabilities

How to Read a Report Card

The purpose of report cards is to communicate about a child's progress across subject areas. Some kids, especially those having difficulty in school, dread report card time. Here are some suggestions for making report card time a little less scary and a little more productive.

Improving Your Child's Behavior in Public Settings

Help your child behave properly in public settings. Meet the five basic physical needs that keep them calm. Community excursions, such as trips to the mall and your house of worship, are challenging for children with learning disabilities. Learn the steps that will help your child improve their behavior.

Inclusion Q & A: A Parent's Guide

Having the opportunity to be appropriately educated in a regular classroom gives your child, for perhaps the first time, the chance to feel "like other kids." The trip to the special education room often has a stigma attached to it.

Interview with Author Mark Smith

Mark Smith wrote from his experiences parenting a son with ADHD. "When we were reading everything we could find about the disorder, we were disappointed not to find more books from a child's point of view that showed other children in the same situation, a book to reassure kids that they aren't the only one this is happening to. That's why I wrote Pay Attention, Slosh!"

Is It a Reading Disorder or Developmental Lag?

How do parents know if their child's reading delay is a real problem or simply a "developmental lag?" How long should parents wait before seeking help if their child is struggling with reading? Susan Hall answers these questions.

Is Your Daughter a Daydreamer, Tomboy or "Chatty Kathy"?

In this introductory article, Kathleen Nadeau focuses specifically on the identification and treatment of AD/HD in girls.

Late Blooming or Language Problem?

Learning Disabilities and Sibling Issues

Siblings of kids with learning disabilities sometimes feel pushed into the background at home. Here's how to balance the needs of your child with LD and your other kids.

Learning Disabilities and Sibling Relationships

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   >   >|