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Legislation & Policy

Teachers and parents often find the law and legal issues surrounding learning disabilities confusing and a bit daunting. With so many acronyms and numbers, it doesn’t take long to feel overwhelmed! This section contains the most concise and pertinent legal and legislative information for teachers and parents. Included are articles about Section 504 and IDEA, ADHD, IEP’s, the least restrictive environment, and more.

There are 54 articles in this section.

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Dyslexia and the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) published by the American Psychiatric Association, includes codes for all mental health disorders currently recognized. Small changes in the DSM can have a major impact on how conditions are understood and treated. Revisions to the 5th edition, to be released in May, 2013, include changes to the name and types of learning disabilities that are identified within the document. Between now and June 15, 2012, the DSM-5 Development team welcomes comments and questions on these changes.

Students With Disabilities in Charter Schools

Charter schools have become a hot topic across the country, with the number of charters exploding in recent years. In this info brief, we examine the challenges and successes of special education in charter schools, including issues related to enrollment, legal identity, infrastructure, school choice, and virtual charters.

Year 2008 Tax Benefits for Parents of Children With LD

Parents of kids with a severe learning disability may be eligible for valuable tax benefits. Read this 2008 update from GreatSchools Inc. to see if you qualify.

Tests and Measurements for the Parent, Teacher, Advocate and Attorney

Learn to develop the evidence you need to support your belief that your child is not receiving the right help in school. Peter and Pamela Wright, from Wrightslaw, tell you how to interpret and chart your child's test scores, graph your child's progress, and successfully communicate with the educators who make decisions about your child.

Advocating Effectively to Resolve Disputes

Learn to get your way in disputes without suing or getting in a fight. People with learning disabilities, and their parents and allies can learn to apply the six steps of successful advocacy.

Transition of Students with Disabilities to Postsecondary Education: A Guide for High School Educators

How do a student's rights and responsibilities change when they move from high school to post-secondary education? Read these questions and answers from the Department of Education to find out.

The Law After High School

Learn about your legal rights and responsibilities for accommodations on the job, disclosure of your disability, documentation of your disability, and many other issues that come up after graduating high school.

Identification of Specific Learning Disabilities

Highlights of Key Provisions

NCLB and IDEA: What Parents of Students with Disabilities Need to Know and Do

Knowing Your Child's Rights

Mediation Opens Door to Amicable Dispute Resolution

Parents’ Rights To Information About Professionals Who Work With Their Children Under IDEA

The ADA and RA in Postsecondary Education and Employment

No Child Left Behind: Determining Appropriate Assessment Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Assessment accommodations help people with learning disabilities display their skills accurately on examinations. Teachers, learn how to test the true knowledge of your students. Don't test their ability to write quickly if you want to see their science skills! Parents, these pointers will help you assure that your children are tested fairly.

Understanding Assessment Options for IDEA-eligible Students

The No Child Left Behind law requires each school test students in Reading/Language Arts & Math each year in grades 3-8, and at least once more in grades 10-12. In some cases, children eligible for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) services may be able to access testing accommodations or even alternate tests, but parents need to fully understand the implications and potential consequences of participation in the various testing options.

No Child Left Behind: Making the Most of Options for IDEA-eligible Students

If a Title I school repeatedly underperforms, federal law provides opportunities for students to change schools or obtain additional instructional support. This parent advocacy brief looks at the information parents of students with disabilities need to know and understand in order to maximize these options.

High School Graduation Requirements and Students with Disabilities

High stakes testing has become a controversial issue with a major impact on students with disabilities. This article includes how graduation requirements are set, arguments for and against high stakes testing for students with disabilities, information on modifications for students with disabilities, and options in case the students fail.

Power of Attorney: Do You Need One?

Attention Foster Parents: Let’s Work Together!

Foster parents know all too well the many needs of the youth for whom they provide care that include academic services associated with special education. The reality is not a surprise given the literature reports at least 50% of youth in foster care require intense academic and behavioral interventions at school. What should foster parents do?

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