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IEPs

Each public school child who receives special education and related services must have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP creates an opportunity for teachers, parents, school administrators, related services personnel, and students (when appropriate) to work together to improve educational results for children with disabilities. This section includes articles about how to create a useful IEP, understanding the IEP process, and the importance of good communication.

There are 62 articles in this section.

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A Student's Guide to the IEP

Learn to help write your own IEP. This guide will show you how to develop an IEP, how to prepare for the meeting, and how to participate. Learn how to organize the meeting and invite people. Take charge of your own education.

Accommodations for Students with LD

The National Center for Learning Disabilities presents examples of accommodations that allow students with learning disabilities to show what they know without giving them an unfair advantage. Accommodations are divided into the following categories: how information is presented to the student, how the student can respond, timing of tests and lessons, the learning environment, and test scheduling.

Addressing Student Problem Behavior

For years, educators have known that behavior difficulties can keep students from progressing properly in school. Laws today require educators to not only notice these difficulties, but take action. This article guides IEP team members through the necessary steps to develop a functional behavioral assessment and an appropriate behavior intervention plan. It is important to determine why the students are acting the way they do.

Advocacy in Action: You Can Advocate for Your Child!

Art and the IEP

Attending Meetings to Plan Your Child's Individualized Education Program (IEP)

This checklist prepared by the PACER Center will help parents prepare for and get the most out of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings with school staff.

Back-to-School: Tips for Parents of Children with Special Needs

Our top 8 back-to-school tips for parents emphasize communication, organization, and staying up-to-date on special education news.

Back-to-School: Tips for Special Education Teachers

Our top 10 back-to-school tips for special education teachers emphasize communication, organization, and a focus on student success.

Can I Go to the IEP Meeting?

Communicating with Your Child's School Through Letter Writing

Write letters to your school that will communicate well. The school system really wants to help your child get the best possible education. This publication shows how to tell them what they need to know. Find model letters to request an initial evaluation for special education services, to review your child's records, to meet to discuss your IEP, and more.

Creating Useful Individualized Education Programs (IEPs)

Developing an Educational Plan for the Student with NLD

Developing Your Child's IEP

Developing Your Child's IEP: The IEP Process

Did You See Your Regular Ed Teacher at Your IEP Meeting?

Disciplining Students with Disabilities

Documenting Communication with the School About Special Services

When dealing with a bureaucracy, and school districts are bureaucracies, you need to keep detailed records. Logs, journals, and calendars provide answers and support memories and testimonies. This article provides examples of how to keep a paper trail.

Dr. Seuss on IEPs

Evaluation: What Does it Mean for Your Child

This PACER Center fact sheet informs parents about evaluation, a process to help determine whether a child has a disability and what the child's educational needs might be. The article discusses the reasons why parents might choose to evaluate their child, types of tests available, factors that should be considered when selecting tests, and questions parents should ask when an evaluation is proposed.

Examples of Accommodations from State Assessment Policies

Teachers and IEP teams: Review the examples of accommodations for testing in this article. They were drawn from 47 states that administer statewide examinations. Accommodations are divided into four categories, when the test is taken (scheduling), where the test is taken (environment), how the test is given (presentation), and how the student answers the questions (response).

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