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Early Identification

Identifying learning disabilities early can pave the way for children to get the support they need to experience successful futures both in and out of school. Knowing the early warning signs that put young children at risk for learning disabilities and understanding normal developmental milestones helps with early diagnosis and intervention. Read more about the early identification process for LD.

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Working with Your Child's Teacher to Identify and Address Math Disabilities

An expert explains how math disabilities are identified and how parents can work with teachers to help their kids.

Early Signs of a Reading Difficulty

Parents are often the first to suspect their child has a reading problem. An expert alerts parents to some of the earliest indicators of a reading difficulty.

Advocating for Your Preschool Child

It's never too early to start looking for ways to help your child succeed in learning. This article covers children who are under 2 and who are in preschool. They have rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Find out the first steps to take if you suspect your child has difficulty learning.

Is It a Reading Disorder or Developmental Lag?

How do parents know if their child's reading delay is a real problem or simply a "developmental lag?" How long should parents wait before seeking help if their child is struggling with reading? Susan Hall answers these questions.

A Way to Help Students Before They Fail

More schools are using a process called Response to Intervention (RTI) to see if a child might have a learning disability. Response to Intervention provides specially designed instruction for children who have scored low on general tests. The students are tested — sometimes as often as every week — to measure progress. Those who improve after the instructional intervention go back to their normal classroom activities. Those who do not improve receive additional testing to confirm the presence of a disability.

How Do You Know If Your Child Might Have a Learning Disability?

If you think your child might have a learning disability, this article will help. Dr. Larry Silver tells parents the clues to look for in pre-school and elementary school children. Then the article talks about how to get a "psychoeducational evaluation" to find out for sure.

Learning Disabilities and Young Children: Identification and Intervention

The National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities developed an overview on screening, diagnosing and serving children age four or younger. The document was developed for researchers, administrators, and people who need an academic overview.

Recognition and Response: An Early Intervening System for Young Children At-Risk for Learning Disabilities

Some young children show signs that they may not be learning in an expected manner, even before they begin kindergarten. These children may exhibit problems in areas such as language development, phonological awareness, perceptual-motor abilities, and attention, which have been considered precursors of learning disabilities in older children. However, under current state and federal guidelines, these children are unlikely to meet eligibility criteria for having a learning disability. This is because formal identification of a child's learning disability generally does not occur until there is a measurable discrepancy between the child's aptitude and academic achievement, often not until the second or third grade.

How Can You Tell When Your Child Has Learning Problems?

Waiting Rarely Works: Late Bloomers Usually Just Wilt

A look at three pivotal longitudinal studies that clearly show: Late bloomers are rare; skill deficits are almost always what prevent children from blooming as readers.

Early Screening Is at the Heart of Prevention

Early intervention works. Because it is also expensive, it's important to be able to identify the kids who are most at risk of reading failure. Thanks to a new generation of screening assessments, we can identify these students as early as kindergarten — and then invest in interventions for them.

Lessons Learned

Read tips for raising a child with dyslexia, written by a mother of a dyslexic son. This article describes how to get your child evaluated,how to hire and work with a tutor, and ways to work reading and academic skills into your daily life with your child, and how to handle the ups and downs of parenting a child who has troubles in school.

The Identification of Students Who are Gifted

This digest discusses the identification of students who are gifted, the difficulties in the identification process, appropriate identification practices, and procedures that can help with identification.

The Process of Discovery: Finding Out Why Your Child is Struggling

ADD/ADHD NICHCY

Interagency Agreements

Early Identification - Observation of an Individual Child

Observing and keeping records of children's behavior is one way of gaining insight into what they do, why they do it, and how they change over a period of time. By knowing more about a child, you can better provide experiences that will meet the needs of that particular child and that will help you to expand on the child's interests. The following information is designed to help you develop some of your skills for observing and learning more about children.

Early Identification: Normal and Atypical Development

Early Identification of Speech-Language Delays and Disorders

If your child hasn't started speaking by age one and or you are concerned about their speech and language skills, there may be a concern. Early identification is key. They need to receive treatment before school begins so they won't miss out on essential pre-reading skills. Learn what the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has to say about early identification, evaluation, and speech-language treatments.

Helping Young Children with Learning Disabilities at Home

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