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Behavior & Social Skills

Social competence and emotional well-being are issues for some adults and children with learning disabilities. Being liked, feeling accepted, and having self-confidence are all related to an individual’s social skills. Included in this section are the “dos and don'ts” for fostering social competence, the teacher’s role in developing social skills, and many helpful articles on behavior modification, anger management, disciplining students with disabilities, and the emotional issues experienced by some individuals with LD.

There are 77 articles in this section.

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Disciplining Students with Disabilities

Emotional Disturbance

Environmental Modification of APD at Home

Executive Function Fact Sheet

Children use executive function to plan, organize, strategize, pay attention, manage details, and schedule themselves. Read this fact sheet from the National Center for Children with Learning Disabilities for helpful strategies.

Facial Expressions and NLD

Facilitating Success for Students with Language-Based Learning Disabilities

For students with learning disabilities (LD), a sense of competence and ability (also known as self-efficacy) plays a vital role in their social and emotional development as well as academic achievement. Discover how educators can adapt their teaching style to support social and emotional development (including self-efficacy) in students with language-based LD.

Finding Friends and Persuading People: Teaching the Skills of Social Interaction

From the Mouths of Babes: What Kids Tell Us About Friendships

Rick Lavoie brings teachers information on how to integrate children with special needs into their mainstream class. The Council on Exceptional Children asked students with good social skills for their suggestions to school staff. Here are some of their requests: a) time to "hang out" with peers with disabilities, b) taking a stand against bullying and teasing of students with disabilities, and c) choosing peers to work with students with disabilities carefully.

Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems Stop Irritating Behavior

Children with executive functioning difficulties are often given to impulsive actions that can be seen as rude or irritating by others. Here are some strategies to help a child curb these behaviors.

Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems to Manage Physical Impulsiveness

Physical impulsiveness — such as grabbing things, pushing and shoving others, hitting, etc. — can cause problems for a child with executive functioning difficulties. Review these strategies to help a child manage physical impulsiveness.

Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems Turn In Their Homework

How can you help the child who does his homework, but then forgets to turn it in? Learn to help children with executive functioning problems plan and organize by reading these strategies.

Helping the Socially Isolated Child Make Friends

Children who are socially rejected by their peers often are preoccupied with their isolation and can't concentrate on their schoolwork. Here are some ways teachers improve kids "social stock" and help them build friendships.

How to Help Your Child with LD Have a Happy Holiday

The holiday season is a time for family togetherness, fun, and friendship. But children who struggle with social and behavioral problems can feel lonely and excluded during this happy time. This article gives you a dozen ways to help your child join the fun.

Improving Your Child's Behavior in Public Settings

Help your child behave properly in public settings. Meet the five basic physical needs that keep them calm. Community excursions, such as trips to the mall and your house of worship, are challenging for children with learning disabilities. Learn the steps that will help your child improve their behavior.

Interpersonal Understanding of Students with LD

Is Your Daughter a Daydreamer, Tomboy or "Chatty Kathy"?

In this introductory article, Kathleen Nadeau focuses specifically on the identification and treatment of AD/HD in girls.

Lauren Ebel - Mentor Teacher

Lauren Ebel is a Special Education Teacher with the Fairfax County Public School in Fairfax, Virginia. She has taught in both public and private settings. She designed, wrote, and implemented "The Developmental Classroom", a speech and language-based primary program. She has worked with children who have learning disabilities and/or emotional problems, stating that many children with LD often experience emotional and behavioral outbursts. Two important classroom strategies she stresses are: (1) Laying ground rules for students and (2) Reinforcement of good behaviors. Her teaching involves much more as you will see as you learn about Mrs. Piggle Wiggle and Monsters.

Lazy Kid or Executive Dysfunction?

Learn to help your students with executive dysfunction organize themselves to do their schoolwork. Learn how executive dysfunction impacts their daily lives. Read tips to help them manage their time, their space, their materials, and ultimately their education.

LD, Interpersonal Understanding and Social Behavior in the Classroom

Learning the Language of Relationships

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