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Accommodations & Modifications

A 504 plan is a legal document that outlines a plan of instructional services for students in the general education setting. Students with ADHD often have a 504 plan. While not an IEP, the document usually describes the types of accommodations that will be made for a student in school. This section contains articles that provide helpful information about 504s and various types of accommodations.

There are 44 articles in this section.

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A Therapeutic Environment Called School: How Charismatic Adults Can Help Kids with LD

All children with learning disabilities need "charismatic adults" in their lives at school. These are educators who enthusiastically and purposefully accept students for who they are and identify and reinforce the strengths of all students. They perceive all students as being capable of succeeding at academic and social demands as long as they are provided with appropriate interventions.

Accessible Textbooks: A Guide for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities

If your child cannot read their textbooks, they need digital copies of their books. Schools now can use National Instructional Material Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) to get e-text. Learn the details that will help you advocate for your child so they can use NIMAS. And learn where to find the publishers and producers that provide e-text.

Accommodations and Compliance Series: Employees with Learning Disabilities

Learn how to accommodate yourself on the job. This article has simple and time-tested strategies for being productive even if you have trouble reading, spelling, writing, or calculating numbers. Read about accommodations for difficulty speaking, organizing yourself, remembering, and managing time. Introductory information on learning disabilities is provided to help managers handle accommodation issues.

Accommodations for Students with LD

The National Center for Learning Disabilities presents examples of accommodations that allow students with learning disabilities to show what they know without giving them an unfair advantage. Accommodations are divided into the following categories: how information is presented to the student, how the student can respond, timing of tests and lessons, the learning environment, and test scheduling.

An Educator's Guide to Making Textbooks Accessible and Usable for Students with Learning Disabilities

Learn how to obtain instructional materials in electronic text for your students who are dyslexic. E-text makes textbooks and other materials usable by supported reading software. Get names and links of publishers and accessible media producers to find the E-text you need. And learn how to qualify your students and obtain materials produced by the National Instructional Material Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) system.

Assisting Students with Foreign Language Learning Difficulties in School

Students with language learning difficulties can learn foreign languages in school, when they have appropriate instructional modifications. This article looks at the kinds of students who may have difficulty successfully fulfilling a foreign language requirement in school, instructional methods that help, and additional adaptations at-risk students might need.

Assistive Technology at Work

Read about the uses of assistive technology (AT) for people with learning disabilities in the workplace. The obligations of the employer and learning-disabled employee are summarized. Job Accommodation Network (JAN) can play a role in facilitating the process. Suggestions are given for commercially available and specialized devices that have an AT function. Links to additional information on AT are also provided.

Assistive Technology for Kids with Learning Disabilities: An Overview

If your child has a learning disability, he or she may benefit from assistive technology tools that play to their strengths and work around their challenges.

Assistive Technology Tools: Reading

Learn about assistive technology tools — from audiobooks to variable-speed tape recorders — that help students with reading.

Beyond "Getting the Answer": Calculators Help Learning Disabled Students Get the Concepts

When should a teacher allow students to use a calculator? Here is a look at what research shows about the when a calculator should be used- and when it should not be used. A flow chart is provided to help teachers make a choice about classroom calculator use.

Dysgraphia Accommodations and Modifications

Signs and symptoms of dysgraphia are described. Use the menu of accommodations and modifications to pick the best ones for your students, so they can learn the material without interference by their writing problems. Examples include; let them have more time, simplify the task, allow assistance for part of the task (i.e. a scribe to physically write for a student, give them tools that will help, or change the format). Do not lower your expectations for actual learning. The last section of the article has remediation recommendations to help the student improve their writing and overcome their dysgraphia.

Dyslexia and High School

An expert shares her observations of a dyslexic student struggling to learn at school. Also included are numerous proven examples of differentiated instruction and accommodations that can help a student to succeed.

Dyslexia and the Challenge of Using Today's Technology

How do people with dyslexia learn to use technology? Learn to solve the problems caused by dyslexia such as remembering passcodes and learning complicated tasks. Find out how to save time doing your work and find files in the computer

Examples of Accommodations from State Assessment Policies

Teachers and IEP teams: Review the examples of accommodations for testing in this article. They were drawn from 47 states that administer statewide examinations. Accommodations are divided into four categories, when the test is taken (scheduling), where the test is taken (environment), how the test is given (presentation), and how the student answers the questions (response).

Feeling Safe at School: How New Technologies Can Help

Children with learning disabilities often feel unsafe. Learn ways that technology can help children with learning disabilities feel safe and secure in school, such as: creating maps that will help the student know where they are in the building; giving them advance access to education material so they can prepare; and reminding them of routines.

Fitting the Response to Intervention Framework with Mathematics Education

While there is a great deal of information on reading and RTI, there is a dearth of research on math with RTI. Thus, the development and implementation of reading and RTI has blazed a path to RTMI (Response to Math Intervention).

Jane Quenneville - Mentor Teacher

This month our mentor teacher is Jane Quenneville, an assistive technology specialist for the Virginia Beach City Public Schools in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Jane, was most recently chosen as teacher of the year for the Special Education Annex, an itinerant group of professionals who serve students with disabilities. Jane began her career as an occupational therapist.

Job Accommodations for People with Learning Disabilities

Practical suggestions for reasonable accommodations are offered for difficulties people with learning disabilities might encounter in the workplace. Ideas are provided for trouble with reading, writing, memory, hearing, organizing and spelling. If a specific problem is not included, read a method to evaluate the problem and propose a solution to the employer.

Making the Written Word Easier for Readers with Print Disabilities

Learn the answers to frequently asked questions about accessing e-text through the National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC). Find out how to obtain e-text so that LD students can get printed material in the format they need.

No Child Left Behind: Determining Appropriate Assessment Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Assessment accommodations help people with learning disabilities display their skills accurately on examinations. Teachers, learn how to test the true knowledge of your students. Don't test their ability to write quickly if you want to see their science skills! Parents, these pointers will help you assure that your children are tested fairly.

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