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Accommodations & Modifications

A 504 plan is a legal document that outlines a plan of instructional services for students in the general education setting. Students with ADHD often have a 504 plan. While not an IEP, the document usually describes the types of accommodations that will be made for a student in school. This section contains articles that provide helpful information about 504s and various types of accommodations.

There are 44 articles in this section.

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Accommodations for Students with LD

The National Center for Learning Disabilities presents examples of accommodations that allow students with learning disabilities to show what they know without giving them an unfair advantage. Accommodations are divided into the following categories: how information is presented to the student, how the student can respond, timing of tests and lessons, the learning environment, and test scheduling.

Response-to-Instruction and Universal Design for Learning: How Might They Intersect in the General Education Classroom?

Helping struggling readers in the general classroom is a challenge, but The Access Center offers a solution. By using Response-to-Instruction’s tiered approach and Universal Design’s equal access philosophy, you can bridge the gap so that you are truly leaving no child behind.

Assisting Students with Foreign Language Learning Difficulties in School

Students with language learning difficulties can learn foreign languages in school, when they have appropriate instructional modifications. This article looks at the kinds of students who may have difficulty successfully fulfilling a foreign language requirement in school, instructional methods that help, and additional adaptations at-risk students might need.

No Child Left Behind: Determining Appropriate Assessment Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Assessment accommodations help people with learning disabilities display their skills accurately on examinations. Teachers, learn how to test the true knowledge of your students. Don't test their ability to write quickly if you want to see their science skills! Parents, these pointers will help you assure that your children are tested fairly.

Dyslexia and the Challenge of Using Today's Technology

How do people with dyslexia learn to use technology? Learn to solve the problems caused by dyslexia such as remembering passcodes and learning complicated tasks. Find out how to save time doing your work and find files in the computer

Two Student Success Stories

Special education students need to be convinced often of their capabilities and need to try out new skills with the benefit of a safety net. The greater their belief in the likelihood of their success, the greater their effort is likely to be. That increased effort generally will result in greater success, leading to greater effort. Once that cycle can be established, student achievement is more likely guaranteed. Following are two of the student success stories from this year.

Protecting Students with Disabilities: Frequently Asked Questions About Section 504 and the Education of Children with Disabilities

The Chicago Office of the Office for Civil Rights developed these materials in response to numerous requests from educators, parents and advocates in Wisconsin to clarify the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, in the area of elementary and secondary education.

Understanding the Differences Between IDEA and Section 504

Compare and contrast Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and Section 504. Topics include identification, eligibility, evaluation, responsibilities for providing a free and appropriate education (FAPE), and due process for disagreements between parents and schools.

Jane Quenneville - Mentor Teacher

This month our mentor teacher is Jane Quenneville, an assistive technology specialist for the Virginia Beach City Public Schools in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Jane, was most recently chosen as teacher of the year for the Special Education Annex, an itinerant group of professionals who serve students with disabilities. Jane began her career as an occupational therapist.

Requesting Academic Accommodations

When to speak up? What to say? And to whom? College students with disabilities must answer these questions as part of developing the self-advocacy skills important for succeeding. Learn more about the typical attitudes a student may encounter on campus, and help rehearse the best response strategy: a self-advocate's good communication skills.

Section 504, the ADA, and Public Schools

Two laws, Section 504 of the Rehabilitaton Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), protect the rights of disabled individuals in public schools. Who is eligible for the services and protections offered by these laws? How is eligibility and extent of disability determined? Due process procedures and required accommodations and modifications in public schools are summarized.

Use of Accommodations in State Assessments: What Databases Tell Us About Differential Levels of Use and How to Document the Use of Accommodations

Twelve states are now collecting information on the use of accommodations during state assessments according to The National Center on Educational Outcomes. The percentage of students with disabilities that used accommodations varied (8-82%) among the 12 states. Data on school level, type of accommodation, disability, and other factors are reported and analyzed.

The Americans With Disabilities Act

Learn your rights with this an essential primer on the Americans with Disabilities Act and how it affects people with learning disabilities.

Setting the Stage for Success: Building Success Through Effective Selection and Use of Assistive Technology Systems

Read about the SETT framework (Student, Environment, Tasks, and Tools) for individualizing assistive technology. The IEP team must analyze the student, environment, and tasks to propose the appropriate assistive technology. This approach can assure that the student actually uses the tools regularly for real learning.

Dysgraphia Accommodations and Modifications

Signs and symptoms of dysgraphia are described. Use the menu of accommodations and modifications to pick the best ones for your students, so they can learn the material without interference by their writing problems. Examples include; let them have more time, simplify the task, allow assistance for part of the task (i.e. a scribe to physically write for a student, give them tools that will help, or change the format). Do not lower your expectations for actual learning. The last section of the article has remediation recommendations to help the student improve their writing and overcome their dysgraphia.

Statewide Assessment: Policy Issues & Questions

Parents and advocacy groups: What do you say when you talk to your state officials about high stakes tests and statewide education assessments? Read this article for questions you can ask to assess the full and fair inclusion of students with disabilities. Assure that they receive the accommodations they need to show what they know.

Examples of Accommodations from State Assessment Policies

Teachers and IEP teams: Review the examples of accommodations for testing in this article. They were drawn from 47 states that administer statewide examinations. Accommodations are divided into four categories, when the test is taken (scheduling), where the test is taken (environment), how the test is given (presentation), and how the student answers the questions (response).

Section 504: The Law & Its Impact on Postsecondary Education

Section 504 states that any institution (including colleges and universities) receiving Federal financial assistance may not discriminate against disabled persons. This article explains how this law affects the admission process, participation in class and curriculum. What modifications can postsecondary institutions make to better accommodate the disabled?

Success in College for Adults with Learning Disabilities

Tips on how adults with learning disabilities can receive accommodations from colleges.

Self-Advocacy in Educational Settings

Students: This article will help you get the accommodations you need. Get proper documentation of the learning disability. Find the person in charge of giving the accommodation. Then propose possible accommodations. You might start with the list of possibilities in this article. Then negotiate with the decision-maker, using the tips provided here.

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