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Response to Intervention

Response to Intervention, or RTI — as it is often referred, is the latest buzz word in education, but what exactly does it mean? We've gathered information to help you understand its meaning and enable you to determine how it can help to support to enable all children to learn.

There are 8 articles in this section.

A Way to Help Students Before They Fail

More schools are using a process called Response to Intervention (RTI) to see if a child might have a learning disability. Response to Intervention provides specially designed instruction for children who have scored low on general tests. The students are tested — sometimes as often as every week — to measure progress. Those who improve after the instructional intervention go back to their normal classroom activities. Those who do not improve receive additional testing to confirm the presence of a disability.

Response to Intervention (RTI): A Primer for Parents

Learn what questions to ask about Response to Intervention (RTI), an approach to helping struggling learners that is gaining momentum in schools across the country. This article from the National Association of School Psychologists tells you the most important features of the process, key terms, and RTI's relationship to special education evaluation.

What is Responsiveness to Intervention?

This brief was developed by National Research Center for Learning Disabilities to help you understand responsiveness to intervention (also known as response to intervention), an education model that promotes early identification of students who may be at risk for learning difficulties and learning disabilities.

Recognition and Response: An Early Intervening System for Young Children At-Risk for Learning Disabilities

Some young children show signs that they may not be learning in an expected manner, even before they begin kindergarten. These children may exhibit problems in areas such as language development, phonological awareness, perceptual-motor abilities, and attention, which have been considered precursors of learning disabilities in older children. However, under current state and federal guidelines, these children are unlikely to meet eligibility criteria for having a learning disability. This is because formal identification of a child's learning disability generally does not occur until there is a measurable discrepancy between the child's aptitude and academic achievement, often not until the second or third grade.

Response-to-Instruction and Universal Design for Learning: How Might They Intersect in the General Education Classroom?

Helping struggling readers in the general classroom is a challenge, but The Access Center offers a solution. By using Response-to-Instruction’s tiered approach and Universal Design’s equal access philosophy, you can bridge the gap so that you are truly leaving no child behind.

RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell

RTI is not a particular method or instructional approach, rather it is a process that aims to shift educational resources toward the delivery and evaluation of instruction that works best for students. This article provides a quick overview of RTI as it relates to reading.

Responsiveness to Intervention and Learning Disabilities

The purpose of this National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD) report is to examine the concepts, potential benefits, practical issues, and unanswered questions associated with responsiveness to intervention (RTI) and learning disabilities (LD). A brief overview of the approach is provided, including attributes, characteristics, and promising features, as well as issues, concerns, unanswered questions, and research needs.