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Kids
Books for Kids

Expressing myself

Who invented English, anyway? Why aren’t words spelled like they sound? And why do I have to spend so much time copying cursive letters from the board when I have trouble reading them in the first place? You might be asking yourself these questions. The books we have gathered may help you understand why writing and spelling are difficult for you. You might feel just a little bit better about your abilities by reading them.

Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein's Letters to and from Children
Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein's Letters to and from Children
By:
Age Level: 9-12
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Kids write letters to one of the greatest scientists of all time--and he answers them!

Eli, The Boy Who Hated to Write: Understanding Dysgraphia
Eli, The Boy Who Hated to Write: Understanding Dysgraphia
By: Regina G. Richards
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

This book tries to help parents, teachers, and students understand dysgraphia. The book also suggests some specific strategies that people with dysgraphia can try. Throughout the story, Eli describes his feelings about writing and the reactions of his teachers and classmates. After an important adventure, Eli and his friends realize that everyone is different with their own strengths and weaknesses.

Journey to Gameland: How to Make a Board Game from Your Favorite Children's Book
Journey to Gameland: How to Make a Board Game from Your Favorite Children's Book
By: Ben Buchanan
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Eleven-year-old (and dyslexic) Ben Buchanan, who created a board game based on the popular Harry Potter books, provides advice for all children who would like to turn their favorite book into a board game. Along with his co-authors, he offers a step-by-step process, with suggestions for parents, librarians, and teachers, on how to help children transform their favorite book into a board game.

The Name Jar
The Name Jar
By: Yangsook Choi
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she? Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name?

The Worst Speller in Jr. High
The Worst Speller in Jr. High
By: Caroline Janover
Age Level: 9-12
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Katie Kelso is sick of being a dork. Now that she’s in seventh grade, she vows that her life will change. She’s going to become a P.K. — a Popular Kid. Soon Katie is up to her neck in problems. Spud Larson, the best looking boy in her class and the leader of the P.K.’s, seems to like her. But so does Brian Straus — sensitive, smart, mysterious Brian. What will happen if her mother turns out to have cancer? And what should she do about the literary magazine? Her teacher wants her to try out for it, but Katie has dyslexia, and she’s probably the worst speller in junior high.

Unjust Cause
Unjust Cause
By: Tehila Peterseil
Age Level: 9-12
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Davey Fischer is a fifth grader who can't seem to do anything right. He can't spell, do long division, or shoot baskets. When he finds out he has dysgraphia, a writing disability, his father can't admit he has a problem. Will Davey get the help he needs?