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For Parents and Professionals

Recommended Books

What Really Matters for Struggling Readers: Designing Research-Based Programs
What Really Matters for Struggling Readers: Designing Research-Based Programs
By: Richard Allington
Allyn & Bacon; 1 edition
(2000)

In What Really Matters for Struggling Readers, nationally recognized scholar Dick Allington offers easy-to-understand interpretations of research that support three important principles: Children need to read a great deal to become proficient readers, they need access to appropriate books, and they need to develop fluent reading to become proficient readers.

What's Your Evidence?: Engaging K-5 Children in Constructing Explanations in Science
What's Your Evidence?: Engaging K-5 Children in Constructing Explanations in Science
By: Carla Zembal-Saul L., Katherine L. McNeill , Kimber Hershberger
Pearson
(2012)

With the view that children are capable young scientists, authors encourage science teaching in ways that nurture students' curiosity about how the natural world works including research-based approaches to support all K-5 children constructing scientific explanations via talk and writing. The chapters guide teachers step by step through presenting a framework of scientific explanation (Claim, Evidence, Reasoning) for students, identifying opportunities to incorporate scientific explanation into lessons, providing curricular scaffolds to support all students including ELLs and students with special needs, developing scientific explanation assessment tasks, and using the information from assessment tasks to inform instruction.

When English Language Learners Write: Connecting Research to Practice (K-8)
When English Language Learners Write: Connecting Research to Practice (K-8)
By: Katharine Davies Samway
Heinemann
(2006)

When English Language Learners Write helps educators connect language acquisition to everyday classroom practices. Samway explains numerous important factors affecting nonnative writers and then she shows educators crucial steps to take for instruction that's responsive to language learners' needs, such as: understanding the literacy practices of non-mainstream cultures; discovering what ELLs can do as writers before they become fluent in English; and providing a print-rich environment to cement the reading–writing connection.

When the Brain Can't Hear: Unraveling the Mystery of Auditory Processing Disorder
When the Brain Can't Hear: Unraveling the Mystery of Auditory Processing Disorder
By: Teri James Bellis

In this book, Dr. Teri James Bellis, one of the world's leading authorities on auditory processing disorder (APD), explains the nature of this devastating condition and provides insightful case studies that illustrate its effect on the lives of its sufferers.

When You Worry About the Child You Love: Emotional and Learning Problems in Children
When You Worry About the Child You Love: Emotional and Learning Problems in Children
By: Edward M. Hallowell, MD

There are a ton of books that offer child-rearing advice, and only a few less that describe research on childhood emotional and learning problems; this is one of the few books that combines the two. Edward Hallowell brings readers into his consultation rooms to meet his clients — and the descriptions and dialogue are effective in bringing the situations to life. When You Worry About the Child You Love will help you understand why your child is unhappy or underachieving, will help you help your child to manage her emotions, and perhaps most important, will help parents do what they can and stop blaming themselves.

Why Are So Many Minority Students in Special Education?: Understanding Race & Disability in Schools
Why Are So Many Minority Students in Special Education?: Understanding Race & Disability in Schools
By: Beth Harry, Janette K. Klingner
Teachers College Press
(2005)

Product Description: This powerful book examines the disproportionate placement of Black and Hispanic students in special education. The authors present compelling stories representing the range of experiences that culturally and linguistically diverse students and their families are apt to face in school, including examples that reveal how social processes and stereotypical expectations often lead to an inaccurate designation of disability. Based on the authors' work in a large, culturally diverse school district, the book concludes with recommendations for improving educational practice and teacher training and for policy renewal.

Why Do English Language Learners Struggle With Reading?: Distinguishing Language Acquisition From Learning Disabilities
Why Do English Language Learners Struggle With Reading?: Distinguishing Language Acquisition From Learning Disabilities
By: Janette K. Klingner, John J. Hoover , Leonard M. Baca
Corwin
(2008)

Product Description: This research-based guide offers educators proven methods for determining when English language learners (ELLs) are having reading difficulties that are related to the language acquisition process and when students' performance issues might be linked to learning disabilities. An excellent resource for general and special education teachers and service providers, the text provides an overview of the language acquisition process and offers a variety of best practices to prevent inappropriate referrals of ELLs to special education.

Why Jane and John Couldn't Read — and How They Learned
Why Jane and John Couldn't Read — and How They Learned
By: Rosalie Fink

Here is a model of reading ideal for striving readers, focused on their personal interests, topic-specific reading, deep background knowledge, contextual reading strategies, and mentoring support. More important, the model moves away from a deficit approach to conceptualize striving readers in a new way. Chapters share success stories of readers who overcome their struggles and highlight instructional strategies and materials you can use to develop activities and lessons for children and adults. Use this research-based model in the classroom or at home to help your striving readers achieve high levels of literacy.

Why Kids Can't Read: Challenging the Status Quo in Education
Why Kids Can't Read: Challenging the Status Quo in Education
By: Phyllis Blaunstein (Editor), G. Reid Lyon (Editor)
Rowman & Littlefield Education
(2006)

This book takes the reader step-by-step through an understanding of the research on reading and ways in which parents and educators can make a difference in the learning ability of every student in our nation's schools.

Why Our Children Can't Read And What We Can Do About It
Why Our Children Can't Read And What We Can Do About It
By: Diane McGuinness

In America today, 43 percent of our children fall below grade level in reading. In her meticulously researched and groundbreaking work, Diane McGuinness faults outmoded reading systems for this crisis — and provides the answers we need to give our children the reading skills they need. Drawing on twenty-five years of cutting-edge research, Dr. McGuinness presents bold new "phoneme awareness" programs that overcome the tremendous shortcomings of other systems by focusing on the crucial need to understand and hear reliably the sounds of a language before learning to read. Maintaining that any child can be taught to read fluently if given proper instruction, she dramatically reveals how dyslexia and behavior problems such as ADD stem not from neurological disorders but from flawed methods of reading instruction. With invaluable information on remedial reading programs that can correct various ineffective reading strategies, this book is a must for concerned parents, teachers, and others who want to make a difference.

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