tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

For Professionals

Recommended Books

Self Esteem & Stress Management

The following are recommended books for parents and educators.

Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
By: Michael Thompson

Best Friends, Worst Enemies brings to life the drama of childhood relationships, guiding parents to a deeper understanding of the motives and meanings of social behavior. Here you will find penetrating discussions of the difference between friendship and popularity, how boys and girls deal in unique ways with intimacy and commitment, whether all kids need a best friend, why cliques form and what you can do about them.

Day One & Beyond: Practical Matters for New Middle-Level Teachers
Day One & Beyond: Practical Matters for New Middle-Level Teachers
By: Rick Wormeli

The middle level years are an extraordinary period of our human development. The only other time we grow as much physically, emotionally, and intellectually is form ages zero to two. But early adolescence is much more than just tripping over large feet and calling friends on the phone to discuss who likes whom. The ways we deal with conflict, relationships, and personal development as adults have direct connections to specific experiences we had between the ages of ten and fourteen. We can create a very positive future then, when we provide careful and compassionate experiences for today's young adolescents.

Developing Recreation Skills in Persons with Learning Disabilities
Developing Recreation Skills in Persons with Learning Disabilities
By: Lorraine C. Peniston

This book is designed to help recreation leaders better understand individuals with learning disabilities in order that they may better implement quality leisure experiences. The book describes in detail characteristics of various learning disabilities; the instruments used to diagnose learning disabilities; self-awareness of a learning disabled in regard to learning, living, and leisure; the benefits of leisure to a learning disabled individual; and possible modifications needed in the delivery of recreation and leisure services to these individuals. Packed with helpful appendices and suggestions, it sheds new light on helping create quality leisure experiences for all individuals.

Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit in
Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit in
By: Stephen Nowicki, Marshall P. Duke

Remember the kids who just didn't fit in? Maybe they stood too close, or talked too loud. Whatever the reason, we called them hurtful names, and they never understood why. Now, clinical psychologists Duke and Nowicki call these children "dyssemic," and offer some ideas of how to help them. Dyssemic children cannot readily comprehend nonverbal messages, much as dyslexics do not correctly process the written word. Yet nonverbal communication plays a vital role in our communication with others, and children who misunderstand or misuse it may face painful social rejection. In Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit In, Duke and Nowicki show parents and teachers how to assess the extent of a child's problem, as well as how to help the dyssemic child.

I Wish I Could Fly Like a Bird
I Wish I Could Fly Like a Bird
By: Katherine Denison, Richard L. Walley (Editor), Tanya Weinberger (Editor)

Rick Lavoie, Former Executive Director of Riverview School in East Sandwich, MA, and producer of How Difficult Can This Be?: The F.A.T. City Workshop "…the book is a winner! This charming tale delivers a message of respect, resilience and hope to its young audience…The adventures of the appealing characters are extraordinarily effective in demystifying learning disabilities for special needs kids and their classmates. It belongs in every elementary school library, and save room on the shelves for the sequels!" This is the story of Chic L. Dee, a boy bird with learning disabilites, who flip-flops when he tries to fly. While he struggles to accept his limitations, he begins to discover his talents, trust his intuition and find his own way. Perhaps most importantly, he learns about making room for differences. Any kid who has ever felt embarrassed socially, who has ever resorted to bravado in the face of shame, will understand Chic — and love this story.

It's So Much Work to Be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success
It's So Much Work to Be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success
By: Rick Lavoie

As any parent, teacher, coach, or caregiver of a learning disabled child knows, every learning disability has a social component. The ADD child constantly interrupts and doesn't follow directions. The child with visual-spatial issues loses his belongings. The child with a nonverbal communication disorder fails to gesture when she talks. These children are socially out of step with their peers, and often they are ridiculed or ostracized for their differences. A successful social life is immeasurably important to a child's happiness, health, and development.

Learning Disabilities and Life Stories
Learning Disabilities and Life Stories
By: Pano Rodis, Andrew Garrod , Mary Lynn Boscardin

This anthology is comprised of two major components: thirteen full-length, autobiographical essays written by persons with learning disabilities and five analytical chapters written by education and psychology scholars. Speaking in terms alternately intimate and analytical, the autobiographical essays each tell of a sustained personal encounter with the challenges and mysteries of living with a learning disability. But these autobiographies are not merely personal, concerned solely with their writers' private lives. Rather, they are also in various ways consciously analytical, offering astute critical readings of culture and society. The scholarly essays are written by such noted educators and psychologists as Lisa Delpit, Robert Kegan, and Janet Lerner. For any educator or parent of students with learning disabilities.

Project June Bug
Project June Bug
By: Jackie Minniti

Life is good for Jenna Bianchi. She's just started her second year of teaching English at Morrison High School, a job she loves. She has a pet parrot with attitude. And there's a handsome math teacher who wants to be more than just friends. But everything changes when a defiant, disruptive tenth grader walks into her classroom.

With a smart mouth and a swagger to match, Michael Tayler is a problem for Jenna from the very first day. His school record screams troublemaker, and Jenna wonders if the new year is already doomed. But when she reads Michael's first poetry assignment, she recognizes it for what it truly is: a cry for help.

Michael's presence sets into motion a chain of events that turns Jenna’s perfect life upside-down and threatens to destroy her career. Faced with a challenge unlike anything she’s ever known, Jenna commits to doing what no one has done for Michael Tayler before.

Click here to read an excerpt from the book.

Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys
Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys
By: Dan Kindlon, Michael Thompson

In Raising Cain, Dan Kindlon, Ph.D., and Michael Thompson, Ph.D., two of the country's leading child psychologists, share what they have learned in more than thirty-five years of combined experience working with boys and their families. They reveal a nation of boys who are hurting—sad, afraid, angry, and silent. Kindlon and Thompson set out to answer this basic, crucial question: What do boys need that they're not getting? They illuminate the forces that threaten our boys, teaching them to believe that "cool" equals macho strength and stoicism. Cutting through outdated theories of "mother blame," "boy biology," and "testosterone," the authors shed light on the destructive emotional training our boys receive—the emotional miseducation of boys.

Raising Resilient Children: Fostering Strength, Hope, and Optimism in Your Child
Raising Resilient Children: Fostering Strength, Hope, and Optimism in Your Child
By: Robert Brooks, Sam Goldstein

In this practical handbook for parents, clinical psychologists Brooks and Goldstein draw on their considerable experience working with children and families to demonstrate that parents' core goal should be to instill in their children a sense of inner recourse. "A resilient child is an emotionally healthy child, equipped to successfully confront challenges and bounce back from setbacks," they contend, and to this end they provide 10 parenting "guideposts" for nurturing the kind of resilience that helps children thrive.

Go to page:   |<   <   1   2   >   >|

Proceeds from the sale of books purchased from our recommended books section can help support LD OnLine.