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For Parents and Professionals

Recommended Books

Parenting & Family

The following are recommended books for parents and educators.

A Good Start in Life: Understanding Your Child's Brain and Behavior from Birth to Age 6
A Good Start in Life: Understanding Your Child's Brain and Behavior from Birth to Age 6
By: Norbert Herschkowitz, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz

This book is an engaging, reader-friendly work which guides parents through the formative years of a child's life. This well-regarded book is now available in paperback, newly revised to reflect the most recent studies. The new edition features information from the latest research, including traumatic events in the news, television and learning skills, physical activity, and temperament.

With a specific focus on the brain, the book takes the reader through specific phases of child development beginning with Life in the Womb an going through the first six years of life. Each chapter ends with a section "To Think About," addressing such practical matters as good-night rituals, reading books together and coping with conflict.

A Mind At A Time
A Mind At A Time
By: Mel Levine

"Different minds learn differently," writes Dr. Mel Levine, one of the best-known learning experts and pediatricians in America today. Some students are strong in certain areas and some are strong in others, but no one is equally capable in all. Yet most schools still cling to a one-size-fits-all education philosophy. As a result, many children struggle because their learning patterns don't fit the way they are being taught.

In his #1 New York Times bestseller A Mind at a Time, Dr. Levine shows parents and those who care for children, how to identify these individual learning patterns, explaining how they can strengthen a child's abilities and either bypass or help overcome the child's weaknesses, producing positive results instead of repeated frustration and failure.

A Parent's Guide to Special Education
A Parent's Guide to Special Education
By: Linda Wilmshurst, Alan W. Brue

The term 'special education' encompasses dozens of learning challenges: developmental delay, learning and physical disabilities, emotional disturbance, retardation, language impairment, autism, and others. By nature of this diversity, navigating even well-run, well-funded special education programs can be daunting. A Parent's Guide to Special Education offers invaluable information and a positive vision of special education that will help them through a potentially overwhelming process. Filled with practical recommendations, sample forms, and enlightening examples, this is a priceless resource for helping every child learn.

A Special Education: One Family's Journey Through the Maze of Learning Disabilities
A Special Education: One Family's Journey Through the Maze of Learning Disabilities
By: Dana Buchman

The celebrated designer Dana Buchman knew almost nothing about "learning differences" when her daughter, Charlotte, was diagnosed with disabilities as a toddler. She soon discovered that the hard work and determination that had taken her from the Ivy League to her own fashion label wouldn't be enough to deal with Charlotte's disabilities; she would have to acquire a new skill set — to be able to see Charlotte as a person with unique abilities. A moving mother-daughter story, A Special Education is an inspiring account of one mother's journey to acceptance and understanding, as well as a family's triumph over daunting circumstances.

Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
By: Michael Thompson

Best Friends, Worst Enemies brings to life the drama of childhood relationships, guiding parents to a deeper understanding of the motives and meanings of social behavior. Here you will find penetrating discussions of the difference between friendship and popularity, how boys and girls deal in unique ways with intimacy and commitment, whether all kids need a best friend, why cliques form and what you can do about them.

Bridging the Gap: Raising a Child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder
Bridging the Gap: Raising a Child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder
By: Rondalyn Varney Whitney

Author Rondalyn Varney Whitney, a pediatric occupational therapist, is the mother of Zac, a child who suffers from nonverbal learning disorder, or NLD. By definition, NLD is a neurological defect in children who are unable to recognize the nonverbal clues that make up 50 percent of communication. In Bridging the Gap, Whitney seamlessly weaves practical professional advice throughout the account of her passionate involvement with her son. She writes, "I believe that NLD, now thought to be as prevalent as dyslexia, is a difference and not a flaw." She also warns parents and teachers that kids with NLD are likely to be misdiagnosed as lazy or defiant, so she urges readers to consider both the strengths (high intelligence and advanced verbal skills and memory) and weaknesses (low visual, spatial, and motor skills and deficits in social communication) of these kids.

Don't Miss the Bus: Steering Your Child to Success in School
Don't Miss the Bus: Steering Your Child to Success in School
By: Mary Ann Smialek

Thoughtful and practical, this book will appeal to today's busy parents, with its concise, easy-to-read style. Now in a convenient format, Don't Miss the Bus! is even more accessible to parents with no time to spare. Smialek offers her expertise as a parent and teacher and shares her methods and anecdotes from her own home and classroom. She advocates a win-win approach with a concise action plan to prevent problems before they happen and maintain dignity for both parents and kids. Don't Miss the Bus! focuses on children's strengths rather than their weaknesses, resulting in happier, more knowledgeable, and more resilient parent-child-teacher relationships.

Dr. Larry Silver's Advice to Parents on ADHD
Dr. Larry Silver's Advice to Parents on ADHD
By: Larry B. Silver, M.D.

With this fully realized second edition of the classic guide, Dr. Larry Silver addresses the subjects all parents wonder about when they suspect their child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: What causes ADHD? What signs should I look for? How can I make sure my child is diagnosed correctly? Could my child have a learning disability, too? What's the latest information on medications and other treatments? What controversial treatments should I watch out for? What should I tell my child's school, and what should they be doing? Dr. Silver's warm, thoroughly practical guide will give parents, teachers, and others the support they want and the answers they need.

Driven to Distraction: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood Through Adulthood
Driven to Distraction: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood Through Adulthood
By: Edward M. Hallowell, MD, John J. Ratey

Through vivid stories of the experiences of their patients (both adults and children), Drs. Hallowell and Ratey show the varied forms ADD takes — from the hyperactive search for high stimulation to the floating inattention of daydreaming — and the transforming impact of precise diagnosis and treatment.

Ending the Homework Hassles
Ending the Homework Hassles
By: John K. Rosemond

A lot of parents struggle with the homework question. Children often think there is too much. Studies tell us though that our children do less homework than children in other countries. As new standards are implemented the homework problem becomes even more daunting. Homework can be a real struggle for students who find school difficult—especially for students with LD and/or ADHD. This guide offers basic strategies. In one sense this is nothing new. In another way, however, it makes the strategies concrete with step by step advice on how to solve the homework wars.

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