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For Parents and Professionals

Recommended Books

Parenting & Family

The following are recommended books for parents and educators.

The Gift of Dyslexia
The Gift of Dyslexia
By: Ronald Davis, Eldon M. Braun

Levinson's use of patient testimonials and case studies to describe his breakthroughs in the treatment of dyslexia makes for a medical text that reads like a novel. He traces both his research on the connection between dyslexia and the inner ear and cerebellum and also the scientific community's skepticism regarding his claims. Formerly a professor at New York University Medical School and currently director of the Medical Dyslexic Treatment Center, Levinson acknowledges criticism and errors and, overall, offers a balanced view of his methods. In the process, he reveals the unfortunate increase in the politics of scientific research. Levinson's book is recommended as a source for the most current research, an account of the patients' plight, and an expose of the scientific debate.

Davis, on the other hand, emphasizes child development, psychology, and education rather than medical treatment. As a dyslexic individual and a teacher, he offers a unique perspective on the subject of learning disabilities. Through his own real-life experiences he shares what everyone needs to know about dyslexia, what the dyslexic student encounters in a typical school, and what is needed to teach such students effectively. To support his conclusion that dyslexics have special talents of perception, imagination, and intuition, Davis cites talented and brilliant figures from Einstein and Leonardo da Vinci to Churchill and Walt Disney.
— Library Journal

The LD Child and ADHD Child:  Ways Parents and Professionals Can Help
The LD Child and ADHD Child: Ways Parents and Professionals Can Help
By: Suzanne H. Stevens

Public libraries will want to purchase this book for their education and parenting collections. It is a brief, upbeat, always realistic look at what learning disabilities are and what problems LD children and parents face at home and at school.
—Library Journal

The Parent to Parent Handbook: Connecting Families of Children With Special Needs
The Parent to Parent Handbook: Connecting Families of Children With Special Needs
By: Betsy Santelli

If you are a parent of a child with special needs, perhaps you have also felt lost and wished you knew someone in a similar situation you could turn to for support. If so, you're not alone. Across the country, parents are providing emotional and informational support to other parents through a national network of Parent to Parent programs. In this comprehensive book, the authors share with you the ins and outs of developing and maintaining a strong, local Parent to Parent program that individually matches "veteran" supporting parents with those who are new to the challenges of caring for a child with a disability. Drawing on research about Parent to Parent groups and best practices in program development and training, you'll get the basics of setting up your own program, including guidelines for finding, preparing, and matching supporting parents with newly referred parents, ideas for organizing and incorporating your program, and evaluating its effectiveness, tips on accessing funding and promoting your program throughout the community, and useful forms and extensive lists of contacts and resources to get you started.

The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind
The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind
By: Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff , Patricia K. Kuhl

An informal and entertaining yet authoritative look at the science of babies minds. The three research psychologists, all of whom are parents, and two of whom, Meltzoff and Kuhl, are married to each other, write about child development as though they were speaking directly to parents they know. As their title indicates, the authors find parallels between babies and scientists: both, they say, formulate theories, make and test predictions, seek explanations, do experiments, and revise what they know based on new evidence. They show specifically how babies learn about people and objects, and how they acquire language.

The Source for Nonverbal Learning Disorders
The Source for Nonverbal Learning Disorders
By: Sue Thompson

The child with a nonverbal learning disability presents a puzzling and challenging profile to teachers, therapists, and parents. This resource translates the research into an understandable manual for the identification and treatment of children and youth with nonverbal learning disorders.

Understanding Your Child's Puzzling Behavior
Understanding Your Child's Puzzling Behavior
By: Steven E. Curtis

When should you seek professional help for your child's behavioral, social, or learning challenges? Understanding Your Child's Puzzling Behavior is the ultimate resource for assessing your child's behavior, learning when to intervene, and knowing how to seek further help for a struggling child. Whether a child is dealing with performance issues, anxiety, noncompliance, angry outbursts, or a host of other difficulties, this book offers a step-by-step method that walks parents through the often-complex process of treating a child's problems.

Voices From Fatherhood: Fathers Sons & ADHD
Voices From Fatherhood: Fathers Sons & ADHD
By: Patrick J. Kilcarr

Voices from Fatherhood is unique in focusing on fathers' concerns in parenting their ADHD sons. It offers fathers support and encouragement and specific management techniques. In summary, this is a book that everyone — fathers, mothers, educators, and mental health professionals — will find useful in helping to understand the dynamics of modern day father-son relationships.

When You Worry About the Child You Love: Emotional and Learning Problems in Children
When You Worry About the Child You Love: Emotional and Learning Problems in Children
By: Edward M. Hallowell, MD

There are a ton of books that offer child-rearing advice, and only a few less that describe research on childhood emotional and learning problems; this is one of the few books that combines the two. Edward Hallowell brings readers into his consultation rooms to meet his clients — and the descriptions and dialogue are effective in bringing the situations to life. When You Worry About the Child You Love will help you understand why your child is unhappy or underachieving, will help you help your child to manage her emotions, and perhaps most important, will help parents do what they can and stop blaming themselves.

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