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Recommended Books

Behavior & Social Skills

The following are recommended books for parents and educators.

ADD/ADHD Behavior-Change Resource Kit
ADD/ADHD Behavior-Change Resource Kit
By: Grad L. Flick

For teachers, counselors and parents, this comprehensive new resource is filled with up-to-date information and practical strategies to help kids with attention deficits learn to control and change their own behaviors and build the academic, social, and personal skills necessary for success in school and in life. The Kit first explains ADD/ADHD behavior, its biological bases and basic characteristics and describes procedures used for diagnosis and various treatment options. It then details a proven set of training exercises and programs in which teachers, counselors and parents work together to monitor and manage the child's behavior to achieve the desired results.

Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children
By: Michael Thompson

Best Friends, Worst Enemies brings to life the drama of childhood relationships, guiding parents to a deeper understanding of the motives and meanings of social behavior. Here you will find penetrating discussions of the difference between friendship and popularity, how boys and girls deal in unique ways with intimacy and commitment, whether all kids need a best friend, why cliques form and what you can do about them.

Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ
Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ
By: Daniel Goleman

Everyone knows that high IQ is no guarantee of success, happiness, or virtue, but until Emotional Intelligence, we could only guess why. Daniel Goleman's brilliant report from the frontiers of psychology and neuroscience offers startling new insight into our "two minds" — the rational and the emotional" — and how they together shape our destiny.

Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit in
Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit in
By: Stephen Nowicki, Marshall P. Duke

Remember the kids who just didn't fit in? Maybe they stood too close, or talked too loud. Whatever the reason, we called them hurtful names, and they never understood why. Now, clinical psychologists Duke and Nowicki call these children "dyssemic," and offer some ideas of how to help them. Dyssemic children cannot readily comprehend nonverbal messages, much as dyslexics do not correctly process the written word. Yet nonverbal communication plays a vital role in our communication with others, and children who misunderstand or misuse it may face painful social rejection. In Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit In, Duke and Nowicki show parents and teachers how to assess the extent of a child's problem, as well as how to help the dyssemic child.

Individualized Supports for Students with Problem Behaviors
Individualized Supports for Students with Problem Behaviors
By: Lee Kern, Linda M. Bambara

Practical and comprehensive, this book focuses on the nuts and bolts of designing positive behavior support plans for students with such disabilities as mental retardation, autism, learning disabilities, and emotional/behavioral disorders. Strategies are provided for addressing individual behavioral problems at all levels of severity. Filled with illustrative examples, the book shows how to conduct a functional assessment and develop an overall support plan, using a team-based approach.

It's So Much Work to Be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success
It's So Much Work to Be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success
By: Rick Lavoie

As any parent, teacher, coach, or caregiver of a learning disabled child knows, every learning disability has a social component. The ADD child constantly interrupts and doesn't follow directions. The child with visual-spatial issues loses his belongings. The child with a nonverbal communication disorder fails to gesture when she talks. These children are socially out of step with their peers, and often they are ridiculed or ostracized for their differences. A successful social life is immeasurably important to a child's happiness, health, and development.

Job-Hunting for the So-Called Handicapped or People Who Have Disabilities
Job-Hunting for the So-Called Handicapped or People Who Have Disabilities
By: Richard Nelson Bolles, Dale S. Brown

Richard Bolles’s What Color Is Your Parachute? has helped millions of readers find their path in life, and now his Creative Approach to Job-Hunting is brought to bear on the specific challenges faced by job hunters with disabilities. In Job-Hunting for the So-Called Handicapped, Bolles and Dale Susan Brown guide readers through the often-frustrating, but ultimately rewarding process of securing independence in their lives and personal satisfaction in their careers. The authors begin by demystifying the intricacies of the ADA, describing in clear terms what the act does and does not guarantee disabled job hunters, and then move on to job-hunting strategies tailored specifically to people with disabilities.

Late, Lost, and Unprepared: A Parents' Guide to Helping Children with Executive Functioning
Late, Lost, and Unprepared: A Parents' Guide to Helping Children with Executive Functioning
By: Joyce Cooper-Kahn, Laurie Dietzel

Executive functions are the cognitive skills that help us manage our lives and be successful. Children with weak executive skills, despite their best intentions, often do their homework but forget to turn it in, wait until the last minute to start a project, lose things, or have a room that looks like a dump! The good news is that parents can do a lot to support and train their children to manage these frustrating and stressful weaknesses.

Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behaviors
Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behaviors
By: Nancy Mather, Sam Goldstein

This book uses the Building Blocks model. The Building Blocks model is practical, supported by research, and easy to implement. It identifies ten areas important to school success (the building blocks), divided into three levels:

  1. the foundational level includes attention and impulse control, emotion and behavior, self-esteem, and learning environment blocks
  2. the symbolic processing and memory level contains the visual, auditory, and motor skills blocks
  3. the conceptual level comprises using strategies and thinking with language and images

Making a Place for Kids With Disabilities
Making a Place for Kids With Disabilities
By: Dale Borman Fink, Ph.D.

Dale Borman Fink, the author of the only book on inclusion of youth with special needs in after school child care, now presents the first book to examine the experiences of children with disabilities participating in youth programs alongside their typical peers. Using a case study technique, he probes into the issues and dynamics that influence the increasing participation of kids with disabilities in such activities as Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and park and recreation programs.

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