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504 plan in private school
Author Message
Posted: Sat, 22 February 2003 08:46:55
Subject:

504 plan in private school

We have a senior in high school at our private college preparatory school who came to us uncoded but with a letter from his middle school teacher stating that he had testing issues but was a bright and enthusiastic student. He struggled his first year here without acccommodations, but with separate testing, extended time and sometimes oral testing he has maintained a B-C average. I encouraged the parents to have him tested before college if he was to qualify for accommodations in college. They just had him tested by his local school department and found that he does not have a learning disability but has ADHD, which we already knew. The sending school were not happy that we asked for a transition plan and have refused to write one for him as his education is not currently impacted. Of course, it isn't as he is being accommodated here. Without these he would be a C-D student. Question-can we, as a private school without special education, write a 504 plan ourselves and how is it best to go about it? Thanks for any input as he will be off to college and graduated from out school in a few months.

Anonymous
Posted: Sat, 22 February 2003 17:38:26
Subject:

Re: 504 plan in private school

First of all, the law does not obligate private schools to provide 504 accommodations as private schools do not receive federal funding. Congratulations to you that you did it anyway! (cheers, applause)

Now, as for your question: to write a 504 plan, you must have a 504 chairperson, who generally must be a certified teacher. Even though you teach at a private school, I know of no law saying you can't have a 504 Coordinator there. Seems to me it should be up to the private school. Sooooooo.......appoint yourself chairperson, and you can write up a 504 plan.........LOL. Fortunately, in Louisiana anyway, there is no "official" form that has to be filled out/signed. You do have to have documentation of the disability and "official" forms(which you can make yourself) to document the 504 status and the accommodations, but so long as the disability falls within the 504 law's definition of "disabililty", your written plan should have all the force of any other 504 plan, legally speaking.

If you need some examples of 504 forms, or if you want clarification on the legal definition according to 504, feel free to e-mail me(Simba590@aol.com)
and I will be happy to provide you with such.

Good luck!

Anonymous
Posted: Sun, 23 February 2003 05:36:56
Subject:

You give me hope!

I have a daughter, still elementary, but I'm a planner (or a fretter - depending on who you ask). I know the local high school has block scheduling and truly believe it will be a nightmare for my daughter.

Is it often that a private school will give some extra "help" to a "bright, enthusiastic student" with an LD?

Anonymous
Posted: Sun, 23 February 2003 14:52:02
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

My son's private school does. They don't remediate, but they willingly accomodate.

Andrea

Anonymous
Posted: Mon, 24 February 2003 09:00:49
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

We do not remediate as mentioned in another thread but we do our best to comply with most accommodations.

Anonymous
Posted: Mon, 24 February 2003 18:32:18
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

Remember that 504 never remediates.......only accommodates, meaning it can give extra time for testing, tests could be read aloud, or anything else that "levels the playing field", so to speak, for a child with a disability.

Ultimately, it's up to the private school to give some extra "help" to an LD child. Whether or not they do really depends on the school. Here in the New Orleans area, for instance, we have many Catholic schools that provide remediation, not just accommodations, but remediation beyond what one would reasonably expect. Then, we have some Catholic schools who basically tell parents of LD kids that "we do not have the resources to provide the assistance your child needs", meaning, we don't feel like dealing with the problem.

Talk to the potential private school of your choice, see what they say.

Good luck!

Anonymous
Posted: Mon, 24 February 2003 19:07:06
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

They are not required by law. However your local USD can provide some assistance however it may mean she has to attend their facility. I don't know any teacher who refuses to help a student who is trying and is enthusiastic. You'll probably get the help you need on site. On the issue of block scheduling - I work in this format and was very sketical but I am a big supporter now. My students only have to focus on two content classes at a time and have more time to absorb information. I think it is good for LD kids. Can't believe I said that!

Anonymous
Posted: Tue, 25 February 2003 06:31:27
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

She uses a laptop about 1/2 the time (of course we would provide it in private school). She is disorganized (TRULY forgets the assignment or the book - we are working with the school OT on this) and cries because she WANTS to do the work. Last night she is doing some social studies work and says "Hey, mom, do you know how the Spanish took Florida from the British and proceeds to tell me" (Like she really enjoys learning this!)

Thanks for the encouragement. To date, she is one who still loves learning and is enthusiastic, mainly b/c we were fortunate enough to be able to address her needs early amd privately and so she has never really experienced a great deal of failure. (Of course she will now have to get a loan of college)

I mentioned the laptop to a friend who has a child in one of the good parochial schools and asked 1) we're not Catholic will they take her; and 2) can she use a laptop? I got a yes and probably not, respectively.

Anyway, thanks for your responses. I can see it will probably take some more research and finding just the "right" school.

Anonymous
Posted: Tue, 25 February 2003 06:34:27
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

Sorry - I don't know the acronym USD. Also, I thought block scheduling would be a nightmare - my friend's son sometimes has 80 vocabulary words to know or 80 ques. to answer each night. And, how can you get reduced homework and still cover the chapter? Might take some really creative gen ed teachers and I think most of them are on this board.

Anonymous
Posted: Wed, 05 March 2003 15:40:54
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

I am encouraged. My 7 year old daughter's teacher (private school) has told me she is uncomfortable passing her on to 2nd grade because of her ADD and problems with focus. I strongly suspect central auditory processing as well, but won't get that diagnosis until April. Her grades are mostly A's and B's with just one or two C's. I was devastated when she told me the school and classrooms weren't prepared to give her the help she needs. The teacher knows I am in the middle of experimenting with ADD drugs but nothing's worked yet. It seems she's willing to throw in the towel. This is only her 3rd year teaching, and with no experience with LD kids. She's made some accomodations like giving her extra time on papers. I think she's trying the best she knows how, but I'm scared to death that come the end of the school year, we won't have a school. I am a single mom with no involvement from her dad. My daughter and I both love the school and I don't mind making the sacrifices to send her there. I am preparing to meet with the principal (when I work up the nerve). Any suggestions or ideas I can discuss with him to convince the school to let her try 2nd grade? Any remarks greatly appreciated!!

Anonymous
Posted: Thu, 06 March 2003 08:44:03
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

I would talk to the principal. It doesn't sound like it is academic and I have a hard time accepting that a teacher could make a decision like that without input from administration.

Do you think it is immaturity? Sometimes kids who are young for their grade have the same characteristics? My K age son goes to a demanding parochial school and I know a couple parents who are having their kids repeat K. The teacher made an off hand comment that she can tell who is the youngest in class (my son is in the middle age wise and academics wise).

I would try to get a handle on what is the cause with your daughter and what she needs. The public schools have to test her if you request in writing but they can be very slow so you might go privately. Then you can approach the principal with more information about what your daughter needs and see if the teacher is speaking for herself or the school.

Beth

Anonymous
Posted: Thu, 06 March 2003 16:37:27
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

Thanks, Beth. My daughter is a bit socially immature, but I think it's more the ADD/CAPD causing that. She gets along great with adults but has trouble with kids. She's literally the oldest in her class (missed the cut off for the next grade by just a few days). I don't want to have her repeat if attention is her true problem; she will just continue to have the same problem until I can find a med or something to help with that. I am preparing to make an appointment with the principal. Also heard about a computer program called Fast Forward Learning that's supposed to be good with CAPD. I'm preparing to go in there with both barrels!! OK, not that drastic, but I'm her only advocate, you know?

Anonymous
Posted: Thu, 06 March 2003 20:58:38
Subject:

Re: 504 plan in private school

Jim from New Orleans seems to be an expert, but in college, if you have a diagnosis from a psychiatrist or neurologist, most colleges have an office for special services (you just have to find out what they call it.) Counselors/advisors at the college can help you make a plan for accomodations, tutoring, etc. Some schools even do screening for LD or refer you to the appropriate specialists.

Anonymous
Posted: Sat, 08 March 2003 21:10:15
Subject:

Re: You give me hope!

We did Fast Forward. It helps receptive language. My son is still CAPD--other sorts of issues but his receptive language skills are very normal now. So it depends what the issues are.

Beth