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Behavior: Social Skills, Self Esteem

Do Regular Ed teachers have to cooperate with an IEP?


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69140
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Posted Nov 24, 2003 at 8:14:52 PM
Subject: Do Regular Ed teachers have to cooperate with an IEP?

My oldest daughter is on an IEP because the results of her multi-factored evaluation showed high academic potential (she makes merit roll in a regular education class regularly), but she doesn't talk/respond/speak up for herself in class, and she's a 6th-grader. If she participated and wasn't afraid to turn things in on time, etc., she would probably be an Honor Roll student. Keep in mind that these behaviors of being mute and scared are only exhibited in the school setting.

Lately, it seems as if the teacher resents the fact that she's not in Special Ed, even though she admits that my daughter has the academic skills, but her lack of social skills hinders her learning and her grades. I asked the teacher to give me regular updates of how my daughter is doing with responding, etc., but the teacher will wait until a month and a half later, after numerous voicemail messages and notes from me, before she'll finally type up a 2-page letter to tell me all of the things that my daughter isn't doing. The teacher doesn't want to give me regular updates. She will only, after a couple of weeks of my contact attempts, type up a letter in anger.

Currently, my daughter sees the Speech-Language Pathologist (to overcome her fear of public speaking) twice a week. She pathologist states she's doing fine as far as communicating in different small groups. However, as I recently learned from her teacher, she's mute in class, even when called upon.

My first gripe is that the Speech Pathologist and the teacher should've had more communication. And second and most of all, the Speech Pathologist should be told of my daughter's disturbing behaviors way before I find out and then have to tell the Speech Pathologist, only for her to tell me that she had no idea.

When I signed off on the IEP, I thought that was my giving the school to do any and everything to get my daughter to talk in school.

Is there a law which binds the teacher to cooperate with my daughter's IEP----I only want the teacher to have a regular relationship with the Speech Pathologist and tell her (the Pathologist) when my daughter is slipping back to being mute?

I guess that's why alot of parents on this bulletin board don't like IEP's. The school pumps them up like they will cure all ills. Then you sign off on them and they do nothing.

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
Posts: 69140

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Posted:Nov 27, 2003 10:31:45 PM
Subject:IEPs

I learned through these bulletin boards of the Withers Case where a reg. classroom teacher was sued for not following the IEP and the parents won some damages. You could look it up on a search engine like google and read about it.

But pratically speaking, I agree with you and find that many teachers don't follow IEPS. In fairness to them, IEPs are often very long and very detailed and thus viritually impossible to implement but regardless - every teacher should have read their students' IEPs.

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Teddy
Joined Jul 01, 2003
Posts: 20

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Posted:Dec 15, 2003 4:54:54 PM
Subject:IEPs

I am a high school LD senior. I have an I.E.P. I am 20 going on 21 Jan. 13th. I am one of those people with normal hearing & sever aniety. As a result of the anxiety I don't talk hardly at all. :oops: Would sign language or word cards help this?
:?:

Teddy

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Jan 28, 2004 12:41:20 AM

I thought the no child left behind act eliminates the special ed classes.

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victoria
Joined Jun 13, 2003
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Posted:Jan 28, 2004 1:48:38 AM

Short answer: YES
The law does require that every person working with the child follow the IEP -- even a politician can see that without this requirement the IEP wouldn't be worth the paper it is written on.

Theory versus practice:
On the one side, as another poster mentioned, many IEP's are flat-out ridiculous. One person who used to post here a lot posted her younger brother's IEP; the accomodations list *alone* was three pages long with about twenty paragraphs. This is for high school where each teacher will see him for a forty-five minute class. As a former classroom teacher, I told her honestly that given this, I would throw my hands in the air. I couldn't even go over that list and check every item on it with him in the class time, much less teach anything to him, not to mention all the other kids in the class. This kind of experience sours many teachers on IEP's -- they figure they are being set up to lose, so they might as well not read the IEP and stay ignorant rather than try and get in trouble for failing.
On the other hand, many teachers are just not prepared. Very few actually know how to teach reading, sad but true. Teachers are not speech pathologists and are not psychological counsellors, and your child's teacher probably feels lost and overwhelmed by the demands that she help your child communicate. Since she doesn't know what she is supposed to do, and she has a pretty full job teaching the regular curriculum besides your child's needs, she probably just puts the issue aside. If the SLP could give her some simple and straightforward guidelines, it could possibly help.

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Teddy
Joined Jul 01, 2003
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Posted:Jan 28, 2004 1:52:07 PM
Subject:I.E.P.'s

I am out of high school now (b/c I turned 21). I am going to take a few college classes (braille online, and math - maybe at the college, my mom would need to transport me though). My question is, does the I.E.P. from high school still stand valid if the person in college is starting after they turned 21? :?:

Teddy

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Beth from FL
Joined Jun 15, 2003
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Posted:Jan 29, 2004 12:30:12 PM
Subject:Beth in FL

IEPs don't apply to college. If you need accomodations, you need to go through your college disability office. Most frequent accomodation is extended time on exams.

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KTJ
Joined Jun 16, 2003
Posts: 223

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Posted:Feb 19, 2004 3:42:48 PM

Add consultation time between the SLP and the classroom teacher to the IEP. It could be 15 minutes/weekly at a minimum so that they are at least communicating with each other.

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Teddy
Joined Jul 01, 2003
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Posted:Jul 10, 2004 10:08:14 PM

Haven't started college yet. Possible moving to Nevada. BTW how are colleges and accomodation there?

Teddy

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Jul 10, 2004 11:02:39 PM

for help...They will test you and if you qualify you will get an "IEP" but in college they call it "accomodations". I am Hearing Impaired and I made sure that I made contact with the students with disabilities office on my campus, we worked out the support that I needed in the classroom, namely an Assistive Listening Device, extended time on tests, taping of lectures that kind of thing.... I graduated with a Masters Degree and now work as a Speech Pathologist.

Sorry I don't know about the colleges in Nevada but I am sure that they abide with the American with Disabilities Act as you aren't the only one with a disability...

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BLB
Joined Jan 22, 2005
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Posted:Jan 22, 2005 2:00:26 PM

I have been teaching special education for four years now and though I cannot possibly compare the frustrations that I have with dealing with "reg. ed. teachers" and their failure to comply and accommodate students needs with the frustrations of a parent, unfortunately it does happen too often. Please make sure that you make every effort to share these concerns with school site administrators as well as your local Special Ed. department as well as the case carrier for your child's IEP. All involved in this "team" process must comply...simple as that. Unfortunately there are gen. ed teachers who want little or nothing to do with special needs students. It is very frustrating for teachers who have students in reg. ed classes who are not getting their fair share according to the IEP. Document everything and contact the school to note frustrations, if they do not take it serious then ask for a copy of your Parental Rights as regulated by the state, do not allow your child to be denied the ed. they need and require by that IEP. I feel for parents who think the IEP is a waste of time or is not being lived up to, use this message board for more resources and help. Thank you. BLB

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Jan 22, 2005 5:39:51 PM

what age or grade students do you teach? My 8th grade son has ld and does not have an IEP; however we have found the middle school teachers(he has 8-9periods a day) pretty accomodating, esp. in English, Reading and Math. In his middle school there are 20-25 kids in a class and I can't imagine how one teacher could provide any special ed teaching while managing the difficult, everyday behaviors of middle school students. My son has learned to speak up when he doesn't understand something, goes for afterschool help(open to all), and can redo tests(as can all students) to raise their grades. We decided on this approach as he is going to a demanding public high school next year. To be honest this would not work for some kids, esp. if they have cognitve issues but I don't see how my son's Spanish teacher(30 in his class) could have time to alter her leassons for many kids-crowd control is the main issue in that class. So you raise a good point, but there are limits to what a reg. ed. system can do on the middle and high school level.

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Jan 30, 2005 8:36:47 PM

The website www.selectivemutism.org has some information that can be shared with classroom teachers. This particular situation won't be fixed with a handout, but you might find more tips on how to develop an effective approach.

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Feb 16, 2005 6:06:48 PM

It is important to have an excellent IEP or 504 Plan in place when you leave high school. In college two laws apply, ADA and SECTION 504. Your accomodations will be based on your IEP, as far as is appropriate under ADAor SECTION 504. If you have related services in high school, these will probably not be covered under those two laws. However, things like books on tape, testing in a room by yourself, oral testing, giving an oral classroom presentation to a smaller group or to the instructor alone, etc., will be available to you. Since these are federal laws, they are applicable in every state.

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Anonymous
Joined Aug 22, 2014
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Posted:Feb 16, 2005 10:21:20 PM

hi, absolutely the reg ed must comply, you can check out wrights law.com
also you can ask for and adendum to be placed on the iep to require the reg ed teacher and speech teacher to communicate weekly, you can have it added into the iep that you are to recieve a daily written note from the teacher as to the status of your childs work, remember you are an equal member of the iep team. you can email me privately if you want more information. mint2bfree@hotmail.com

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