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Teaching Students with LD and ADHD

Teaching kids with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome


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Joined: Jul 06, 2003
Posts: 1255
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Posted Feb 02, 2004 at 1:02:19 PM
Subject: Teaching kids with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

I'd like to hear from anyone who is teaching or has taught kids with
fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The kid in question is not living with his
biological parents; has a measured lowish IQ though I dont' really think it measures his intelligence (seems average but he is immature). Doesn't have judgement issues associated with FAS.

Please send me a message so I could ask you these things specifically.

Thanks,

--des

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iconicsalimander
Joined Sep 27, 2010
Posts: 1

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Posted:Sep 27, 2010 7:37:42 PM

My sister (adopted) has FAS. She has many developmental disadvantages in learning. Though we were counciled that she will never learn to read or do math, she has both learned to read and write, do math AND do it well! Really she is overshooting all of the "professional" opinions and predictions we were given when we first got her (she was 2)
Sh is now almst 20. She smokes, drinks, smokes pot but is far more togerther than many of her friends.
She is in AA and really wants to not be dependant on alcohol. I am happy to answer any more questions you may have.
I am a firm believer in NOT limiting growth and development by listening to what the establishment says they will and wont accomplish. This is my firm position.

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GennyLeeTracy
Joined Oct 13, 2010
Posts: 2

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Posted:Oct 13, 2010 5:21:06 PM

Des,

I have taught a student with FAS. She tested with in the MR range on all standardized testing. She was placed in my regular education first grade class due to a misread IEP. She was receiving more services in regular education then if she were to be placed in special education. She needed to have a firm routine, and a well disciplined classroom. She benefited from having classroom responsibilities. Although she knew all her letters and names, she was unable to blend them together to make words. I exposed her to all first grade material, but taught her to read through whole-word. She was able to read at grade-level by the end of first grade. She has since been placed in a special education setting since she is not able to keep up academically. However, I do believe she could of been successful in a regular education setting (with support services) if other teachers were willing to adjust their curriculum as I did.

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