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dyscalcula in college


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69138
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Posted Oct 26, 2004 at 7:50:16 AM
Subject: dyscalcula in college

My youngest child is almost finsihed high school and I decided to try college in an attempt to do something useful with myself after my youngest leaves home. I've been through all the testing for myself, so I already know my IQ score is 93, I have dyscalcula, ADD and other problems. I want to teach elementary education, however, so far I'm not doing very well in my classes and I only go part time. I got through Eng comp with a B average, Phych 101 with a low C, faliled psych 102. Now I'm attempting Foundations of Education and just got a 69% on the midterm. I"m failing my intro to computer software class. Is it time to face reality and stop wasting money, and be satisfied to housewifing for the next 30 years of my boring little life? At this point I don't think I'd get hired as a teachers aid for kindergarden.
Honest opinions please.

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Sue
Joined Jun 14, 2003
Posts: 1845

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Posted:Oct 27, 2004 12:00:19 PM

s

Sue J, webmastress www.resourceroom.net

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Sue
Joined Jun 14, 2003
Posts: 1845

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Posted:Oct 27, 2004 12:01:14 PM

I work with students like you every day. Attitude and study habits are a lot more important than IQ (and for the record, a lot of people with IQ scores -- not to be confused with a true measure of ability -- 93 or lower have graduated), and they can be learned. Did the grades you have gotten come with help, or pretty much from your own efforts?
Going back to school is tough -- and it's easy to get discouraged, but the discouragement is what defeats more people than real disability. However, that doesn't mean disabilities aren't real and that you're cut out to be an elementary school teacher. There are an awful lot of elementary teachers who are afraid of math and transfer it to their students, and I meet them when they're like you, trying to figure it out in college (and convinced that they have a disability -- which sometimes they do, but often not).
How long did it take you to write that message? You write better than a lot of students I work with. And if you don't mind, do you have subtest scores on that IQ test? WHat were the high and low points?
Don't be afraid to explore lots of career paths. Maybe you have -- but I talk to so many people who are going back to school and, as if we were still back in the 1800's, they're considering nursing or teaching. Period. (It took me years to figure out that teaching really wasn't the right career for me.)
Some of the folks I work with do have unrealistic goals; one very likable person really wants to be a P.E. teacher, but cannot read and write (don't know about math skills). While this person would be a great role model & leader for kids, if you can't read that health textbook.... (The student doesn't perceive a problem; not sure how easily remediation would come.) So, I'm not going to tell you "Sure you can do it!" -- I think teaching is too important for that. However... maybe you can, especially if you have been trying to do it all on your own.
And don't knock kindergarten aides :-) Hey, I wouldn't be hired for that one... I never did get that special trick for putting a kid's coat on with both arms at once over his head :-)

Sue J, webmastress www.resourceroom.net

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 22, 2014
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Posted:Oct 27, 2004 3:26:46 PM

The grades I've earned so far have been through my own efforts. THis computer class I'm taking now (basic software) is kicking my butt- I'm not going to pass the course. (all that money wasted!). But, at least I have the books and I can work on it at home and maybe teach myself eventually.
It doesn't take me long to write messages. I've always been good at English and I'm on email at least 6 times a day.
The subset scores: Math- ss90, %25 (numerical operations) and,
ss76, %5th (math reasoning). I don't know what those numbers mean or what grade level my abilities are. I actually was too afraid to ask. I felt horrible enough knowing my IQ was that low.
I just know this degree is important to me for my own sense of pride and accomplishment. I"m very relieved that my kids have more brain cells than I do. I wasn't a lot of help when it came to math homework once they got past 5th grade.
I wasn't knocking teacher aids. I used to be one when my kids were younger in a different state. I loved the job but the pay was awful, not much over minimum wage.
Thanks for the reply. I appreciate it.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 22, 2014
Posts: 69138

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Posted:Oct 27, 2004 6:58:01 PM
Subject:kathy

Kathy every person with any l.d. is different. I am not a scholar on l.d.'s. But, I shall tell you one thing that I know for certain. If you have dyscalulia, then just do not think of your i.q. as a number at all. The one uniting factor that all people with dyscalulia have in common is that your i.q. testing will show a very wide range of abilites with regards to "math" and "english". I put math and english in quotes because you shall more than likely have way higher scores in english than you will with math, on the good 'ole i.q. test. And once again, I am not a scholar on l.d.'s.


So, you have to take that notion of an i.q. being some number that is some indicator of your own personal level of intellegence and just throw it out with the trash. I am soo serious. Mine were so off, that the lady who re evaluated me put every last blessed thing that could remotely pertain to i.q. as a series of strengths and weaknessess along with my "i.q" score.
I am not trying to make a pun, but if you have dyscalculia, do not even allow yourself to think of that i.q. testing as a number.


I know nothing, nothing, of add and "other problems." But I do know that you just should not even think of that "i.q." as anything at all. Just put the notions of i.q. out of your mind and do not let that score define you as a lady. And that is really all I know, my dear!

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noinwi
Joined Oct 28, 2004
Posts: 7

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Posted:Nov 02, 2004 9:19:17 AM

Kathy,
You didn't say what your other problems were, but if you have a doctors documentation of your disabilities, you may be eligible for help from the dept. of vocational rehabilitation, regarding testing and career choices and maybe even training. You don't need to have a disability that's "approved" by SSA, but just medical documentation. They can help guide you, using your work history, interests, and capabilities.
They are helping my husband retrain due to multiple disabilities(including ADHD), and although he's having some difficulties, they are supporting him with a counselor, some funding, and computer programs specific to his needs. Just knowing he has someone in his corner helps him a great deal. Also, the schools work with the DVR counselors and provide tutors and extra time for assignments and tests if needed. It sounds like you've done a great deal on your own, and would really benefit from a little support.
I've tried going back to school myself a couple of times, and could never get anything out of it(job-wise), not knowing that I had my own LD's(ADD,Dyscalculia, poor short term memory), only to be diagnosed after the fact.
So go to your local DVR office and apply.All they can say is no. And if you're eligible, it might just be the boost you need to succeed.

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