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Teaching Students with LD and ADHD

ADHD/ODD/CONTROLLER


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69138
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Posted Mar 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 AM
Subject: ADHD/ODD/CONTROLLER

I have a female student who recently underwent her triennial and was found to qualify for continued LD services, however slightly, but is presenting major problems in my classes. She is defiant, rude, controlling, disrespectful, barely works at her math, and shows all the sighns of emotional abuse at home. I was contacting home regualrily, until I discovered what these signs were evidence of. She barely puts forth any effort, and usually chooses to do nothing. She is a strong reader and does not allow that to carry over to our class. She contributes when she chooses and does well in seatwork or boardwork, but just does only what she wants to do. Her defiance, although not diagnosed, is the most powerfully defiant person I have ever met. I am tired of dealing with her, and my class, the rest are all 7th grade boys, is very angry that she does nothing, while they are expected to work. Even the principal has found her too much to deal with when she is that defiant. I have spoken to the psychologist and he offers token suggestions that amount to CYA on his part. The guidance dep't has been some help, but she finds a way to "change" everything to her advantage, which negates the support options I have. She comments on every little thing that goes on in the room(who's out of their seat, not working,looking around, talking, etc), so I often just ignore her and go on with class. We have a very individualistic class, with each student primarily working on their own. This allows lots of freedom and they do well with that approach. Any suggestions will be implemented, I can guarantee that, as I am at wits end with the kid. I have even taken to seating her behind a partial isolation box, at least so that the boys can't see her and thus they work better when not focused on her behavior.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
Posts: 69138

Other Topics
Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: I have a female student who recently underwent her triennial and was
: found to qualify for continued LD services, however slightly, but
: is presenting major problems in my classes. She is defiant, rude,
: controlling, disrespectful, barely works at her math, and shows
: all the sighns of emotional abuse at home. I was contacting home
: regualrily, until I discovered what these signs were evidence of.
: She barely puts forth any effort, and usually chooses to do
: nothing. She is a strong reader and does not allow that to carry
: over to our class. She contributes when she chooses and does well
: in seatwork or boardwork, but just does only what she wants to do.
: Her defiance, although not diagnosed, is the most powerfully
: defiant person I have ever met. I am tired of dealing with her,
: and my class, the rest are all 7th grade boys, is very angry that
: she does nothing, while they are expected to work. Even the
: principal has found her too much to deal with when she is that
: defiant. I have spoken to the psychologist and he offers token
: suggestions that amount to CYA on his part. The guidance dep't has
: been some help, but she finds a way to "change"
: everything to her advantage, which negates the support options I
: have. She comments on every little thing that goes on in the
: room(who's out of their seat, not working,looking around, talking,
: etc), so I often just ignore her and go on with class. We have a
: very individualistic class, with each student primarily working on
: their own. This allows lots of freedom and they do well with that
: approach. Any suggestions will be implemented, I can guarantee
: that, as I am at wits end with the kid. I have even taken to
: seating her behind a partial isolation box, at least so that the
: boys can't see her and thus they work better when not focused on
: her behavior.Dear Bill,I can truly feel your frustration. As a teacher for students (k-5) who are emotionally disturbed, this is not an uncommon experience with students in my classroom. As we all know the best plan is to have the parents working as a team, however it sounds as if this is not the case. I am wondering if this young lady is receiving medication and counseling. Students who are eligible for services as a student with LD, can very often have comorbids, such as ADHD, etc. The interesting thing is many people (staff, parents, teachers, etc.) seem to have a problem recognizing that a lot of the problems in school, particularly in girls can be linked to ADHD. Girls are often not diagnosed until middle school or junior high because they sort of lay low. Eventually, as the hormone changes take place and social interaction is very important, girls begin to demonstrate more of ADHD behavior. Most of it can be disruptions due to verbal outbursts! I would think a good medical re-eval should be completed, along with observations to note behaviors across the settings. While you are correct in your concerns with home problems, it would be good to rule out what you can through a medical intervention and observations. Keep in mind that many girls have known for sometime that something is just not quite right, and yet they do not know how to express this feeling as it is not comfortable. This feeling of being "out of it" somehow can lead to frustration and anger leading to acting out behaviors. It could very well be a cry for help.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
Posts: 69138

Other Topics
Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Hi Bill, I'm not sure I understand why you stopped contacting this child's parents at home. Who decided her behavior was "evidence" emotional abuse, and how would cutting off contact be helpful? How did her parents take to your calls before you became concerned about possible abuse? Were they receptive, interested, concerned? Did they appear to be looking for help and/or support? Did they come to scheduled meetings at school? Do these parents have other kids who are doing OK? Sometimes wonderful parents are doing their best (just as you are!) and still are "in over their heads" with a particular child. Sounds like more than LDs are complicating the picture.It may well be that this student is being abused, but it also may be that her behavior is caused by other factors. It sounds as though she is in need of a thorough medical evaluation and psychological counseling. What do you know about her status in these areas? What services is the school providing?If you or the psychologist or the guidance department have a strong suspicion of abuse, you must report it to the authorities. Do you have a school social worker on staff? If so, speak with this person about your concerns. Someone needs to make that call as you are all mandated reporters.What kinds of suggestions has the school psychologist suggested for classroom management? HOW does this girl manage to manipulate (change)everything to her advantage? Sounds like you're not having much fun, Bill. Please give us some more information...It sounds like you need more support than your getting! JJ: I have a female student who recently underwent her triennial and was
: found to qualify for continued LD services, however slightly, but
: is presenting major problems in my classes. She is defiant, rude,
: controlling, disrespectful, barely works at her math, and shows
: all the sighns of emotional abuse at home. I was contacting home
: regualrily, until I discovered what these signs were evidence of.
: She barely puts forth any effort, and usually chooses to do
: nothing. She is a strong reader and does not allow that to carry
: over to our class. She contributes when she chooses and does well
: in seatwork or boardwork, but just does only what she wants to do.
: Her defiance, although not diagnosed, is the most powerfully
: defiant person I have ever met. I am tired of dealing with her,
: and my class, the rest are all 7th grade boys, is very angry that
: she does nothing, while they are expected to work. Even the
: principal has found her too much to deal with when she is that
: defiant. I have spoken to the psychologist and he offers token
: suggestions that amount to CYA on his part. The guidance dep't has
: been some help, but she finds a way to "change"
: everything to her advantage, which negates the support options I
: have. She comments on every little thing that goes on in the
: room(who's out of their seat, not working,looking around, talking,
: etc), so I often just ignore her and go on with class. We have a
: very individualistic class, with each student primarily working on
: their own. This allows lots of freedom and they do well with that
: approach. Any suggestions will be implemented, I can guarantee
: that, as I am at wits end with the kid. I have even taken to
: seating her behind a partial isolation box, at least so that the
: boys can't see her and thus they work better when not focused on
: her behavior.

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