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Teaching Students with LD and ADHD

IEP's and 504


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69138
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Posted Mar 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 AM
Subject: IEP's and 504

I'm looking for suggestions for what to request in getting help for my sons. My 12 yo (ADD) is taking the SAT's next week because he has tested so high, but he is in danger of failing 7th grade because he is doing so poorly in class. I'm only finding what is available by accident. (No one is offering) I went for a 504 meeting once this year and was told that making anything easier would just make him lazier (or give him an excuse to not do well). Now I'm finding out that it could include easy thngs like letting him stand up to do his work or having a set of text books at home. So, any suggestions would be appreciated. And my 10 yo (specific learning disorder in reading and writing) who also tested above average intelligence is struggling. We do have an IEP for him, but he still seems to have alot of reading and writing homework. This is very frustrating for him. How do I handle this? Thanks

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 01, 2014
Posts: 69138

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

PASSWORD>aaypjoGdHk2QkI am so tired of hearing (from lazy teachers) that kids with a real disability such as ADHD are merely lazy and interventions will only make them lazier.This is not a bogus disability, it is real. Unfortunately, most schools do not set up sources for parents to learn of possible interventions which is why this BB is so helpful.In addition to the interventions you stated, many kids find that taking tests in another location where they are not distracted by other students, etc. can be very helpful.In the meantime, I am assuming that the dx of ADHD was determined by a physician. Ask that person to write a note. Find literature (available under this site) describing the disability and print it out, then distribute it to those not educated enough to know what it really is. Also, on this site, you should be able to find many suggestions for dealing with it in school -- and I am sure the parents of kids with ADHD can also offer ideas.Good luck in dealing with these ignorant but educated teachers.: I'm looking for suggestions for what to request in getting help for
: my sons. My 12 yo (ADD) is taking the SAT's next week because he
: has tested so high, but he is in danger of failing 7th grade
: because he is doing so poorly in class. I'm only finding what is
: available by accident. (No one is offering) I went for a 504
: meeting once this year and was told that making anything easier
: would just make him lazier (or give him an excuse to not do well).
: Now I'm finding out that it could include easy thngs like letting
: him stand up to do his work or having a set of text books at home.
: So, any suggestions would be appreciated. And my 10 yo (specific
: learning disorder in reading and writing) who also tested above
: average intelligence is struggling. We do have an IEP for him, but
: he still seems to have alot of reading and writing homework. This
: is very frustrating for him. How do I handle this? Thanks

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 01, 2014
Posts: 69138

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

There are many types of accommodations that can be made not only during times like the SAT's but also in the classroom. The Individuals with disabilitites act (IDEA-97) and the Rehabilitation Act 504 mandates that no one with a disability be discriminated against because of that disability.The 504 accomodations strategies you are looking for levels the playing field. It is a Law that the school must adhere to. Tell the school principal and the school district office that unless you get a written plan detailing the accommodations needed for your children, you will file a complaint with the State Board of Education in your state, as well as the Office of Civil Rights. This should get their attention. I am going to try to send you an article detailing the difference between the IDEA and 504 and hope you get it. Finally, you might call the assessment office of the school district and ask them to send you a pamphlet of the kinds of accommodations that can be made for children with disabilites. There are a host of things that can be done depending on the disability. These include small group testing, extended time, frequent breaks, for some kids simplyifying and reading the instructions, decoding words, providing for oral instead of written answers... the accommodations place some limits of course. Obviously, if the child is being tested for reading, you can't read the stories to the child. However, if they are in the seventh grade and taking a social studies or science test but read at the 3rd grade level, then having someone read the questions to the student would be allowable.Good luck.

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 01, 2014
Posts: 69138

Other Topics
Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: I'm looking for suggestions for what to request in getting help for
: my sons. My 12 yo (ADD) is taking the SAT's next week because he
: has tested so high, but he is in danger of failing 7th grade
: because he is doing so poorly in class. I'm only finding what is
: available by accident. (No one is offering) I went for a 504
: meeting once this year and was told that making anything easier
: would just make him lazier (or give him an excuse to not do well).
: Now I'm finding out that it could include easy thngs like letting
: him stand up to do his work or having a set of text books at home.
: So, any suggestions would be appreciated. And my 10 yo (specific
: learning disorder in reading and writing) who also tested above
: average intelligence is struggling. We do have an IEP for him, but
: he still seems to have alot of reading and writing homework. This
: is very frustrating for him. How do I handle this? ThanksThere are many 504 accommodations for your sons in the classroom and while they are testing. For your 12 year old son teachers and those administering the test may give him extra time to complets the test or even allow him to take it individually in another room. This will keep him from be distracted from other children taking the test. Breaks between parts on a test may even help him do better. So I think he would do fine if accommodations like these were made. Some of the same accommodations should be made with your ten year old child. Perhaps while testing or in the classroom teachers could read the questions to him to help him out. They may give him extra time also in order to read and write the answers. These accommodations are very important when it comes to children with learning disabilities. So before your children are tested be sure they get the best accommodations possible to help with their learning disability and to ensure they make a good grade on the test.

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