tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

advertisement

Forums
Teaching Students with LD and ADHD

Math Programs for LD Students


Author Message
Joined: Nov 15, 2004
Posts: 25
Other Topics
Posted May 22, 2007 at 5:15:23 PM
Subject: Math Programs for LD Students

Hi,

I need some help choosing a math program for my son and daughter. One is struggling with simple math--learning addition, subtraction--memorization is a problem. The other is struggling with pre-algebra. I am good in math but I'm having a problem communicating how to 'do it'. Anyone have some good programs that have worked well? Thank you!

Drae

Back to top Profile Email
scifinut
Joined Jul 11, 2005
Posts: 550

Other Topics
Posted:May 22, 2007 8:28:26 PM

I really like TouchMath for basic math skills. Its kinesthetic so it helps a lot of kids connect better.

Pre-Algebra is a bit harder. Is your child having difficulty with the concepts?

http://www.math.com/homeworkhelp/PreAlgebra.html has some good explainations and examples.

http://www.sosmath.com/algebra/algebra.html This is another good math site that might be helpful.

scifinut mom to: ms 16, bp/adhd/anxiety/complex ld mr. 20, add/dyslexic I hear and I forget I see and I remember I do and I understand. -Anonymous

Back to top Profile Email
Drae
Joined Nov 15, 2004
Posts: 25

Other Topics
Posted:May 25, 2007 12:52:23 PM

Thank you for the reply. I think the biggest problem with the pre-algebra/algebra is 'thinking' too much. I've tried to explain that math is easier than language because the rules apply each and every time with no exceptions. If he knows the formula to a problem, then just plug the numbers in. If you really want to wrack your brains, wait for the theoretical math. This seems to be common to kids at this stage of math--just use the formula and stop thinking so hard!!! It has helped but I think I need to give him more practice at applying this for it to really sink in. He also need practice at knowing where to apply 'formulas' for different problems because he forgets how he is supposed to solve it. Now that I think about it, this is probably the biggest hurdle.

Back to top Profile Email
jnuttallphd
Joined Jan 11, 2004
Posts: 64

Other Topics
Posted:May 25, 2007 1:07:08 PM

Hello Drae:
Are you doing homeschool? Or are you trying to catch up on the school's curriculum? If you are doing homeschool take a look at Saxon Publishing for Saxon Math.
Jim Nuttall -- Michigan
Dictated with speech recognition software Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9.1.
www.geocities.com/jnuttallphd

Jim -- Michigan www.geocities.com/jnuttallphd

Back to top Profile Email
Ken C
Joined Jun 16, 2003
Posts: 63

Other Topics
Posted:May 25, 2007 3:11:49 PM

If your younger is having problems purely with memorization, if you are certain the concepts are mastered, then take a look at Great Leaps Calculation. I wrote it, make money from it, and do not use (try to not use) these forums for profit....but since you asked. If you choose to write your own math facts work, elementary students should be writing answers at about 40 digits per minute in third grade, 4th and 5th graders should be working at writing answers at 50 dpm. Oral answers should come without hesitation at about one per second. Ken Campbell

author - Great Leaps

Back to top Profile Email
john
Joined May 27, 2007
Posts: 1

Other Topics
Posted:May 27, 2007 3:00:39 AM

Hi Drae,
For difficulties with pre-algebra, their is an online program Conquer Maths that you might like to have a look at? Your son or daughter can try out some lessons and see if it is helpful.
http://www.conquermaths.com/
John

Back to top Profile Email
Jenn
Joined Jun 12, 2003
Posts: 98

Other Topics
Posted:Jun 02, 2007 7:16:10 AM

Hi - I can't say strongly enough how much I recommend a program called Math-U-See; it's designed for homeschoolers, but it is slowly making its way into sped. rooms because it's multi-sensory. I use it with some of my LD students, and they are successful, and have shown true growth and retention all year. The web site is www.mathusee.com. It is primarily a home school program; at the top of the web page you will see a link to join the yahoo chat group for math u see, and you can read thousands of comments by other parents, as well as open a file section on games and other tools. As it's designed to be taught at home, the lessons are on DVD's; many people have their children watch the DVD's with them, especially the older ones (they go from K level all through high school). The creator, Steven Demme, teaches the "whys" behind math, and children are able to "teach back" what they have learned. The web site also offers some free products, such as an introductory DVD explaining the program, a worksheet generator that goes along with their curriculum, and an on-line facts drill. The program is affordable, and is available on e-bay as well as a swap sight on yahoo; be careful because the prices on e-bay are usually higher than what the official web site sells it for.
Many parents have chosen this over other more common programs, such as Saxon or Modern Curriculum Press, and have not regretted it. I used Saxon in my resource room for many years, but have now changed over to this for good.
Good luck - hope this helps!
Jenn

Back to top Profile Email MSN
spedie
Joined Jul 20, 2006
Posts: 15

Other Topics
Posted:Jun 05, 2007 10:33:57 PM

Transition Math and Algebratic thinking are two programs for older math students. Transition math is research based although expensive.

Number Worlds is good for younger students

Special ed in more ways then one.

Back to top Profile Email
Owenbprince
Joined Jan 16, 2006
Posts: 10

Other Topics
Posted:Aug 25, 2008 1:33:28 PM

Quote Drae:

Hi,

Quote Drae:

I need some help choosing a math program for my son and daughter. One is struggling with simple math--learning addition, subtraction--memorization is a problem. The other is struggling with pre-algebra. I am good in math but I'm having a problem communicating how to 'do it'. Anyone have some good programs that have worked well? Thank you!

Quote Drae:

Drae

You will find free charts on the "DotMath for kids" web site that will help with basic math memorization. In 1966 I put dots on top of the number symbols and found that did harm to childrens ability to do math so I do not recommend that anyone do that. Now I teach dots patterns that are like dice patterns and show how to associate them with the number symbol and with the digital numbers. I then explain how every number is a calculator. The only place you can get this info is from the "dotmath for kids" web site. You can find it with any search engine. Just type "dotmath for kids" into any search box to find more info on this system.

Owen

Owen B Prince

Back to top Profile Email