tagline
WETA

Search LD OnLine

Get our free newsletter

advertisement

Forums
IEPs and Legal Issues

Study Guides and Notes


Author Message
Joined: Oct 31, 2007
Posts: 16
Other Topics
Posted Nov 07, 2007 at 6:30:22 PM
Subject: Study Guides and Notes

I work as an ICS/Resource teacher. I make up study guides/ notes for my classified students.(It's in some of the IEP's, and I make it available for all of my classified students.) My immediate supervisor was upset that I was giving out the guides. She said,"YOU GIVE ME the guides/notes, not the students! YOU ARE ENABLING THEM TO DO NOTHING." I am upset, because this conversation took place in the hall between classes, and caught me off guard. When I went to see her, at the end of the day, she was gone. So I feel unsettled about this.

First of all the students take notes. However, they often lose them, or have inaccurate information. I want them studying the right information.

In the past, I gave the notes to my supervisor, and they were lost or not given out.(Why am I doing this, if it doesn't benefit my students?}

Numerous parents have thanked me, for helping their children. The students have also told me the guides/notes are helpful.

I'm not even sure what to do. My child with ADD gets study guides/ notes too. As a parent, I find it very helpful
I don't agree with what she wants me to do, but she's my immediate supervisor. HELP!

Back to top Profile Email
Goodysbaby
Joined Nov 03, 2004
Posts: 59

Other Topics
Posted:Nov 14, 2007 10:54:34 AM

I would sit down with your supervisor at a convenient time for both of you. Ask her what her beliefs are regarding the study guides. I am not sure what grade or grades you are teaching but study guides have been a consistent accommodation in IEPs that I have worked from.

I agree with you why would we want parents to study with students that have inaccurate or incomplete notes. When these students get to college they have notetakers some use only the notetakers notes others use them as supplement.

This is a basic accommodation for students with ADD or ADHD. I would be interested in her reasoning.

Shel If your not kicking hard enough your not making waves!

Back to top Profile Email
always_wondering
Joined Jun 12, 2003
Posts: 94

Other Topics
Posted:Nov 14, 2007 11:08:24 AM

As you know, and I'm sure your supervisor knows, if the IEP says that a study guide or notes are to be provided, then legally they need to be provided.

If the children are not paying attention because they are not taking notes, that is a completely different issue. That is a class management problem.

My son is an auditory learner. He has terrible handwriting and writing is so difficult for him that it takes most of his mental effort to write. If he is taking notes, then he cannot listen. Then he is stuck because the auditory portion of teaching is over. All he has left is his visual mode.

He learns better when all he has to do is fill in a word or two on a note sheet. This keeps them still involved, but does not tax his brainpower significantly (for some it may depending on their disability).

If you are the teacher in the room, and this method is working well for you, plus you are legal, I think the supervisor needs to be politely set straight.

By the way, what is she going to do with the guides????

I can understand that the supervisor wants the info to

Back to top Profile Email
always_wondering
Joined Jun 12, 2003
Posts: 94

Other Topics
Posted:Nov 14, 2007 11:08:24 AM

As you know, and I'm sure your supervisor knows, if the IEP says that a study guide or notes are to be provided, then legally they need to be provided.

If the children are not paying attention because they are not taking notes, that is a completely different issue. That is a class management problem.

My son is an auditory learner. He has terrible handwriting and writing is so difficult for him that it takes most of his mental effort to write. If he is taking notes, then he cannot listen. Then he is stuck because the auditory portion of teaching is over. All he has left is his visual mode.

He learns better when all he has to do is fill in a word or two on a note sheet. This keeps them still involved, but does not tax his brainpower significantly (for some it may depending on their disability).

If you are the teacher in the room, and this method is working well for you, plus you are legal, I think the supervisor needs to be politely set straight.

By the way, what is she going to do with the guides????

I can understand that the supervisor wants the info to

Back to top Profile Email