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I am running out of time


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Joined: Feb 12, 2008
Posts: 2
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Posted Feb 12, 2008 at 11:57:13 PM
Subject: I am running out of time

I have a 9 year old son in the 3rd grade. He is well- liked by everyone. He has ADHD. I started trying to get him on the RIGHT meds. when he was in 1st grade. He is the small percent of children that doesn't responsed to stimulates. We have been to 3 specialist and tried 5 different meds. Nothing seems to help. He is struggling in school. Homework is a nightmare!!! I am even a 2nd grade teacher and I can't seem to help. He is a strong reader but math is his weakness. Due to his ADHD he rushes through all school work. We are fixing to take TAKS in 3 weeks. I don't know what to do. His grades are low 70's. I don't know what else to do.
I guess I am looking for someone that can tell me that they too have experiences in stimulates don't work. What did you do?

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scifinut
Joined Jul 11, 2005
Posts: 550

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Posted:Feb 13, 2008 9:01:51 AM

While neither of my kid can take stimulants it is for very different reasons. My son tried a number of different ones but ended up stopping them because of the side effects. We tried a lot of different things for him. RNA/DNA supplements seemed to work the best for him. He also uses music to help him focus.

So, if you are looking for alternatives, there are plenty out there. Naturopathic, supplementation, behavior therapy, diet changes, neuro or bio-feedback, sensory therapy, lighting changes, etc.

scifinut mom to: ms 16, bp/adhd/anxiety/complex ld mr. 20, add/dyslexic I hear and I forget I see and I remember I do and I understand. -Anonymous

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majaw
Joined Aug 21, 2003
Posts: 54

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Posted:Feb 20, 2008 2:32:54 AM

My two dyslexic children also have a difficult time focusing. I would guess if I had them tested someone would tell me they are ADHD. For a variety of reasons, we don't do the prescription drugs. Anyway, late last summer our tutor sent home an information sheet about a natural drug called SYNAPTOL. She has students and a mother who stopped taking Ritalin and use it. So, I read what I could find, debated a long time and finally ordered three bottles. My boys started taking it and it helps. It isn't a cure all but there is definitely a difference in behavior when they take it. Saturday we were out and my oldest (one who take the SYNAPTOL) said _ is sure wild today. I said it was because I forgot to give dear child medicine that morning. Wow! My oldest replied. Is that what happens when we don't take our medicine. I've noticed my oldest taking it the past couple of days without being asked.

Does it solve all the problems. No but it has helped. I'm convinced that the solution is probably a combination of things. I was really hesitant about taking a "natural" drug but I decided to try it and it has helped. Like I said, there is an obvious difference in behavior when they take it and when they don't.

Maja

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
Posts: 424

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Posted:Aug 20, 2008 12:01:55 AM

I was in a group of 5% of children that wouldn't respond to the stimulants. Though i am hard core anti medicating children except when they are a danger to themselves or others because NO ONE KNOWS WHAT THE LONG TERM EFFECTS ARE ON THE DEVELOPING BRAIN! As an adult i found Vyvanse. Which i do take happily and willingly after being used as a drug litmus mule against my will through my childhood. Your kid reads well.... Oh no he doesn't do well in math, forgive me but the horror, he gets Cs!

I didn't do well in math either i still hate it. I am an archaeologist. Back in school for egyptology at the moment. My life was destroyed as i am married to a PHD and will be moving soon to Vienna Austria with him where the quality of life is oh soooo much higher than here and where the euro is worth sooo much more than the dollar. Where we will be living on something like 40thousand euros (Which at the moment is about double what the dollar is worth) after taxes a year. Because my getting 70s on my math tests... Yes this horror number as a grade really ruined my life. When i graduated from highschool i had only made it halfway through algebra 1. All 70s and even a few 60s... Hate math always have always will. Today though, after spending the last 2 years living with my now husband, BECAUSE I WAS LITERATE with no help from him, i took myself in 4 months through trig. Then, i spent 6 months studying pre cal and calculus with my husband the PHD in theoretical physics with an emphasis on quantum mechanics that studies what happens to matter at high temperatures. Once i had finished calculus, i continued studying with my husband. Now, when he has trouble he brings his work home to me. Because i have LD and my mind wraps around things differently i have been actually disturbingly useful. But now that i have a very good math base, i try to avoid it as much as possible because i hate it. And i refuse to even properly balance my checkbook because it's boring.

My point is this, your child can read. He isn't entitled to be interested in one thing over another or to have preferences? If he isn't earning a D or below i dunno why there is such serious concern... If he can read then i don't understand why people worry.

I swear to the gods, all of them (No i am far too lazy to count them all that requires way too much math which i hate. So please don't ask how many there are or what their names are.) I dunno why schools teach anything besides reading and grammar. Because anything else anyone wants to know if they can read they can go learn it in their own time when they are good and ready.

This society is sick where a well liked well behaved well read child still somehow isn't quite good enough... He doesn't do well in math... Can't kids have a weak subject and pass with mediocrity anymore without parents being up in arms like they are some sort of horrendous failure or diseased, without turning it into the second coming of the apocalypse.

I swear to the gods, i have long believed that ADHD behavior is learned. I can tell you exactly who i learned mine from... My mother. Nice lady well intentioned and a good person though we have our differences but manic... workaholic... etc totally impulsive etc... Parents, ya all need to relax you are actually teaching your kids to be ADHD through your behavior such as freaking over a C grade in math when all other grades are fine and social development seems on track... Lets not make mountains out of molehills.

There is no drug that actually makes your kid smarter or raises your child's grade. Maybe if your kid's dream in life was to go to an ivy league school and they were applying to said schools and in their junior year of highschool this would be worth even discussing but we are talking about someone not even 10 years old. Lighten up. Or put drugs in your bodies to help you lighten up rather than in your kids who are simply sponges learning from the behaviors that you all model for them.

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
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Posted:Aug 26, 2008 10:52:52 AM

Brown2,

Has your child been identified by your local school division as a child with a disability? Does he/she have an IEP?

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
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Posted:Sep 03, 2008 3:10:44 PM

Mandi,

Without doubt you are a well intentioned parent who cares much for your children and others. However, I find your replies to be often contrite and not very helpful or "on point" to a parent who is seeking helpful assistance. Not every instance in dealing with a school division is Armegeddon or a "war zone".

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
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Posted:Sep 05, 2008 9:42:09 AM

Mandi,

Thank you for your reply. I do regret that the educational process for you was not what you had hoped. I sense it was a truly bad experience and has created an expectation that obviously will not be changed.

You are what you think you are and the same goes for expectations of yourself and others. I can only say that the educational system should not be held totally accountable for what you perceive as abuse and a lack of concern. There are two sides to every issue. It may be worthwhile to examine what could have been done differently.

Parents I have observed are at wits end with the perceived needs of their children and are confused about what they want at times. There is nothing wrong with "telling it like it is" but when a parent is asking for help, they are asking for an answer in order to gain a focus and perspective to permit them to go to the next step whatever that may be.

Peace.

DRHD

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
Posts: 424

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Posted:Sep 06, 2008 6:38:52 PM

Nono, you are most assuredly right on the money! There are 2 sides to every story. That was just what i was trying to make you understand! I am glad you are able to do so. For far too long and far too much (as it still to some degree does continue in far too many cases, with some cases it does not continue it does vary some... Still, in most cases, it continues where the words of those who have been through it atleast in the case of LD related issues and school services etc are far too ignored.) I speak up, because i have to. If i stay silent, this can happen again. It does slowly get better. You are a wonderful tool for people here and you are not wrong in saying there are 2 sides. Just please, don't declare those who don't discuss or interact the way you would prefer them to on what you would prefer them to and go to sort of what you would call 'off base' to the issue, as not being helpful. We are helping in our own way using our own unique minds. We are helping those who do not yet have the right to vote or to speak up in any way that has to be heard. As children, no one LD or normal has any rights what so ever. Once we reach adulthood, we have an obligation. To speak up. For those who still can not.

Everyone's perception is different. I am simply sharing mine, that is based on a long road of bad experiences for which many are to blame. Myself included for some things. But for many more the school system, the parents the experts etc screwed me up alot more than i was or would have been without some ummmm 'assistance.' It is VERY crucial to remember that we are people too. That we think that we feel that we have identities beyond LD issues, which is far too frequently forgotten. Though the only side of us you may be able to perceive, or a parent may be able to perceive or a school etc, we remain multi faceted complex human beings with very real identities beyond what is 'perceived.' by far too many. And so our issues take the front row seats and the rest of our beings are often ignored or mistreated in an effort to help us. I recognize the good intentions donät think that i don't but there is such a thing as too much help. Too much modification, too much insistence that we are very different that we are other. It's not that i perceive a lack of concern it's that so much of the concern feels.... misplaced. Not on knowing and understanding one's child but instead a desperate freak out and search and struggle to find a way to understand a learning style or an abnormality to the detrament of the larger whole, that is.

You are right as well there does need to be a focused answer. This is something i have been working on all my life and will continue to do. But that doesn't make what help i have to offer for some reason less necesary or less fundimental. I am not an expert on the school system. I am one single woman who went through hell and ultimately became an archaeologist. I value the answers you give but as usual i feel like you on the ummm 'other side' who acknowledge there are more than one side to everything clearly do not value my side. Which is in essence why i am here. And why i answer at all. To give another perspective focused or otherwise Useful or otherwise.

Yes parents are often at their wits end, i know. I have seen it. It breaks my heart. Because to me it feels far too often as if their children become alien to them suddenly as soon as the 'verdict' so to speak is read. Then just loving their kids for who they are becomes so much more difficult and the focus is suddenly switched to saving their child and far too often, these kids really donät need *saving* just some minor alterations to how things work in school or outside school etc whatever. A different modality to get done what we all must do to be competent people. Or some slight extra help to learn the accepted modality. Too much concern merely stunts growth! So does, depriving the whole identity of a child of being taken under consideration and assisted to grow in favor of solely focusing on and growing very specific skills or whatever.

Also, i like to answer, because i am still standing. After everything... all of it... I am still here. I am still standing, supporting myself studying and or working in my field. I am living proof, that the freak out that so many have when they hear their chilod may be somewhat like me, is not necesary. Freaking out only creates more difficulties. So i answer, though i am not an expert or an expert on the school system or an expert on the individual child at hand. I answer, because what i went through, has to serve some purpose beyond the torture and torment of a helpless little girl who when she asked why she had to go through it all was told 'so that no child in the future needs to go through it, so we understand these things and can help them without putting them through this stuff.' 20 years ago.... So i answer and i tell what truth i have. Because far too often my truth is far too ignored by the ummm 'other side' and far too often, it is insulting to hear the freak out from another parent. Because i am not a bad person. I am a person of a great deal of compassion for all living things. Someone who loves and enjoys being loved. Someone who has lived and learned in a way that is not frequently apreciated in relation to these issues. So sorry for offending your principals of what is important but honestly to me it seems the only issues of importance are those these children who travel through all this walk away with when it is over. The issues that they noted in journals at the time so that one day, they could pick a bone with those who have some control over these systems so that they could help others being treated in a similar fashion. So sorry for being so irrelevant to you. But i will continue to enjoy your answers no matter how you feel about mine.

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annette10dance
Joined May 13, 2008
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Posted:Sep 07, 2008 12:15:11 PM

I have detailed convervations with a friend of mine. I believe that ADHD medication only works on a child who has ADHD.

There could be other factors that mimic ADHD. One factor is a LD. It could be anxiety. It could be sensory. It could also be vision. A good book to read is "The Out of Sync Child" by Carol Kranowitz and "When a child struggles;the Myth of 20/20 vision" by Dr. David Cook.

My son had a detailed vision processing test which is a separate exam from standard eye tests. My son had "convergence insuffiencey" and "eye teaming" problems, so the eyes are not in sync reading accross the page and makes him tired and rub his eyes.

He has vision therapy twice a week for 32 sessions. Insurance pays for half and we pay out of pocket for the other half since it's educational related.

I hope you can look into some of these other factors. I am not aware that ADHD medication works on a child that doesn't have it. Let us know how things go.

Annette

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
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Posted:Sep 11, 2008 6:57:52 PM

Hmmm i dont think it is true that medicine for ADHD only works on ADHD. No one even knows for a definative fact what in the brain is responsible for ADHD.

"Many professional persons and members of the general public still believe that if stimulant medication leads to improvement in the child's behavior, it is solid proof of the diagnosis of ADHD and good reason to continue the drug. What they evidently do not understand is that, as with other cerebral stimulants such as caffeine, the effect is experienced by almost all who take it, including completely normal children (Bernstein et al., 1994; Rapoport et al., 1978; Rapoport et al., 1980)."

William Carey, MD., Director of Behavioral Pediatrics in the Division of General Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, "Is ADHD a Valid Disorder?"

"People are still surprised to learn that Ritalin, Adderall, and Concerta along with all the other new stimulant drug formulations prescribed ostensibly to treat ADHD, also work in "normal" children and adults. A myth continues, which began with the very first case reports in the 1930s, that stimulants work "paradoxically" to calm hyperactive children. In reality, stimulant drugs have the same effect on everybody - low doses (like those for ADHD) improve everyone's concentration and get people to be more methodical."

Lawrence Diller, MD., "Getting Up to Speed for the SAT"

http://www.adhd-report.com/biopsychiatry/bio_5.html

Coffee makes you awake too yes? I am sure you drink it every morning. Guess what, it makes me hyper too. May i also stear everyone to read the bit by Dr. Breggin who deserves a metal for his work and then some also found on that site.

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
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Posted:Sep 11, 2008 7:38:33 PM

Mandi, you provided a quite researched and informative response. I am in complete agreement.

Having served on the Virginia General Assembly Task Force regarding the Use and Misuse of Methyphenadate ( Ritalin) Among School Aged Youth. On this task force were noteable neurologists, pediatricians, and psychiatrists.

I concur with your conclusions. A child with a diagnosed condition associated with ADHD or otherwise not diagnosed would benefit from a medication designed to target focus, inattention, and hyperactivity. The issue then is use and then misuse.

Your response was excellent.

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
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Posted:Sep 11, 2008 7:38:56 PM

Mandi, you provided a quite researched and informative response. I am in complete agreement.

Having served on the Virginia General Assembly Task Force regarding the Use and Misuse of Methyphenadate ( Ritalin) Among School Aged Youth. On this task force were noteable neurologists, pediatricians, and psychiatrists.

I concur with your conclusions. A child with a diagnosed condition associated with ADHD or otherwise not diagnosed would benefit from a medication designed to target focus, inattention, and hyperactivity. The issue then is use and then misuse.

Your response was excellent.

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:Sep 11, 2008 7:39:18 PM

Mandi, you provided a quite researched and informative response. I am in complete agreement.

Having served on the Virginia General Assembly Task Force regarding the Use and Misuse of Methyphenadate ( Ritalin) Among School Aged Youth. On this task force were noteable neurologists, pediatricians, and psychiatrists.

I concur with your conclusions. A child with a diagnosed condition associated with ADHD or otherwise not diagnosed would benefit from a medication designed to target focus, inattention, and hyperactivity. The issue then is use and then misuse.

Your response was excellent.

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:Sep 15, 2008 5:51:14 PM

Mandi, thank you. I am pleased to be someone's hero.

DRHD

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sbp4life
Joined Jul 26, 2004
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Posted:Oct 23, 2008 2:48:34 AM

Mandi I am sorry that you have had bad experiences. It must have been rough. But there are people out there who have ADD and who benefit from medications. Here is some other information based on research that people reading this may be interested in

~~ In recent years, problems in the frontal lobe have been blamed for ADD. But new research is now showing that there may be areas more strongly linked. A study at Leiden, Netherlands (Leiden Univ) found that children with ADD have more delay in "orienting to cues" rather than impaired decision making (which was previously thought to be the culprit). Using new imaging techniques, they have found that the children seem to have a problem in a lower region of the brain, the attention system. This means that they are slow to detect the source of new incoming stimuli or cannot separate one source from another. Similar information is coming from the University Clinic for Child & Adolescent Psychiatry in Essen Germany. Their imaging study shows impaired function also in the limbic system of ADD children in what they call "intercortical dialog". Basically, problems with the left side which processes details and the right side which specializes in global processing. A study at the University of Denver, Dept. of Psychology is also showing that ADD involves not only the frontal lobe, but other regions as well, particularly the right parietal lobe.

~~ A study at the University of Pittsbugh, School of Medicine, looked at highly aggressive children diagnosed with ADD. Half the children were given a placebo (sugar pill) and the other half were administered methylphenidate (Ritalin). In their double-blind study, the Ritalin group had significantly reduced their aggressive behavior.

ADHD

~~ Traditionally, researchers considered that the brains of children with ADHD were just developing differently than the brains of children without ADHD. But new MRI research show the condition may actually be a brain delay, rather than just abnormal development. Normally, a child's cortex thickens slowly up to around age 7, then thins out. It turns out that the cortex of a brain with ADHD doesn't reach its peak thickness until around age 10. This delay, coupled with an early motor cortex maturity may explain some of the symptoms of ADHD. Price, M (2008) Monitor on Psychology, Vol 39(2), pg 12.


~~ Young children with ADHD who later also develop conduct disorders are at a greater risk for substance abuse and criminal behavior. However, researchers have found that the parenting of these children has a large effect on their outcome. Maternal depression poses the greatest risk for these children and positive parenting during the early years with these children offers significant protection again these risk factors. Chronis, A. et al. (2007). Developmental Psychology, Vol 43(1) 70-82


~~ For years we've associated problems in the prefrontal
cortex as one of the major contributors to ADHD. Researchers at Queens College in NYC are arguing that model. They hypothesize that the development of this area actually just correlates with the reduction in ADHD symptoms as the person develops. They feel that ADHD is due completely to noncortical dysfunction, develops very early in the brain's life and remains constant throughout life despite the fact that some symptoms may lessen with development. Haperin, J. & Schulz, K. (2006). Psychological Bulletin, Vol 132(4), 560 - 581.

~~ A recent article by leading Harvard Medical School
experts summarizes the most up-to-date research and understanding of ADHD(attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder):
The disorder affects about 10% of all children worldwide. About one-half of the children with ADHD will continue to have some type of impairment from it through adulthood. Genetic studies have shown it to be highly heritable and while heredity seems to be the leading cause, some pre-natal and even early childhood events can also be linked to ADHD. From a molecular standpoint, research points to catecholaminergic circuits and impaired transmission of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Research in treatments has shown both non-stimulant and long-acting traditional treatments such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) to be safe and effective, especially when coupled with behavioral interventions and treatment. Biederman, J. & Faraone, S. (2005). Lancet. Vol 366(9481) 237-248.


~~ From Beijing, China we see an interesting study looking at the different responses to the use of methylphenidate (brand name, Ritalin) for ADHD and a very specific gene. Some children respond well to Ritalin for inattention, some for impulsivity and some for both. What these researcher found is that those children who responded well to Ritalin for impulsivity were also children who have a very specific version of the gene responsible for norepinephrine transport. So the inattention and impulsivity components to ADHD may come from separate genetic factors. Yang, L. et al (2004). Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Vol 43(9), 1154-1158.

~~ A recent Greek study looked at verbal memory and recall times for children with and without ADHD. Their subjects were school children 7 - 11 years old. They gave them numbers and phrases to be learned for later recall. While both the children with ADHD and those without scored equally well on accuracy when later tested, the ADHD children took a significantly longer time to recall their answers and a much longer time to articulate them. Kourakis, L. et al (2004). DevelopmentalNeuropsychology. Vol 26(2), 565-570.
~~ More research out now on the genetic component to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Thought to be a genetic event with many genes involved, UCLA researchers have found additional evidence pointing to one of the culprit genes - named SNAP-25 (for those biology enthusiasts - it's a mutation on the 3' end of an untranslated region which encodes a synaptic vesicle docking protein). The gene most commonly is associated with paternal transmission. (sorry Dads....hate to keep blaming you). Kustanovich, V. et. al (2003). Molecular Psychiatry. Vol 8(3), 309-315.

~~ Diagnosing pre-schoolers with ADHD seems to some to be inaccurate, unneccessary and perhaps even detrimental. A study from Dalhousie University in Halifax shows just the opposite. They observed 50, 3 to 6 year olds in a preschool setting, half diagnosed with ADHD and half not. The ADHD children were off-task significantly more time than the non-ADHD children. They were also much more talkative and active. Their conclusion: early diagnosis of ADHD appears valid and may be useful in establishing behavioral programs at an early age to help these children be successful. DeWolfe, N, et. al. 2000. Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol 4(2), 80-90.

~~ We now have one of the first pieces of research to show an actual physical brain change using biofeedback for ADHD. Researchers in Germany put children (ages 7 - 13) diagnosed with Attention Deficit - Hyperactivity Disorder through a "slow cortical potentials" (SCPs) training program for 3 weeks. They found a fairly significant reduction in impulsivity and improved behavior ratings from parents as well as changes in actual brain potentials. Heinrich, H. et al (2004). Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 55(7), 772-775.

~~ We've long known that people who are not touched and held much as very young infants can have a host of problems as teens and adults, but the biology behind it has been vague. Now researchers in Brazil are finding physical brain changes in handled vs non-handled infants. Their study involved other mammals, but found that infants handled during the first week had a very significant reduction or pruning of cells in a region known as the Locus Coeruleus (LC). This LC area is the region responsible for attention, some memory and sleep/wake cycles. Problems in this region have been linked to both attention deficit and hyperactivity. In their study, the changes in the LC remained very different in the "held and touched" infants even for months afterward indicating a long term effect of early touching of infants versus neglect. Lucion, A. (2003). Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol 177(5), 894-903.

~~ The American Journal of Psychiatry reports that the new once-a-day atomoxetine treatment for ADHD seems to be very effective in treating the disorder in both children and adolescents with very few side effects or negative safety issues. Atomoxetine is sold under the name of Strattera. Michelson, D. (2002). American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol159(11), 1896-1901.

~~ Here's more research on the genetic side of ADHD as well as an interesting gender preference for inheriting the disorder. Trinity College, Ireland, has found 3 genetic ties to ADHD, all having to do with dopamine levels. Dopamine receptors, the dopamine transporter genes and genes responsible for synthesis of dopamine are all linked to the disorder. The study also found that the ADHD responsible genes tend to come from the father's genetic make-up more so than the mother's genes. Kirley, A. et al. (2002). Neuropsychopharmacology, vol 27(4), 607-619.

Do you inherit ADHD? Yes, according to the research that continues to support the connection between genes and ADHD. Two new studies point to more than one gene as being involved in the disorder. Research out of Hamilton, Ontario correlates ADHD to the DRD4 dopamine receptor gene. (specifically the gene's exon III coding sequence). Other research shows that the DRD4 may interact with other gene regions such as the serotonin transporter promoter gene. Schmidt, et al. 2001. Psychiatric Genetics, vol 11(1), 25-29. and Auerbach, J. et al. as above pg. 31-35.

~~ Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, stress - which of these substances/events when used by a pregnant woman is most likely to lead to ADHD in the child? Nicotine! - according to a summary of the research released out of Denmark. Nicotine use during pregnancy showed the greatest risk for Attention Deficit & Hyperactivity problems later in the child's life. Alcohol and caffeine studies could not support any contribution and the research on stress shows that it may contribute slightly to ADHD. Linnet, K., et al. (2003). American Journal of Psychiatry. Vol 160(6), 1028-1040

~~ ADHD children show a very predictable instability in their sleep patterns. The irregularities include: sleep onset, sleep duration, and amount of true sleep received. In fact the pattern is so distinct and severe, that the National Institute of Mental Health feels that sleep pattern could be used as a diagnosis for ADHD. Gruber, Sadeh, & Raviw. 2000. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 39(4), 495-501.

~~ A new study out on medicating ADHD, shows that the best results were obtained when using Ritalin (MPH) mixed with caffeine. The study showed that impulsivity and agression as well as planning skills were most effected by the combination of these two drugs. (When used separately, Ritalin is more effective than caffeine and amphetimines work about as well as Ritalin.) Leon, M. 2000. Journal of Attention Disorders, vol 4(1), 27-47.

~~ According to a study published last year, there appears to be an optimum window of learning opportunity after administering ADD medication. In the study of ADHD boys aged 9 - 11, reading was greatly improved (mastery, fewer errors, higher rate per minute) during the first hour after Ritalin compared to 3-4 hours after medication. Kastner, J., et.al. (2000). Psychology in the Schools, vol. 37(4) 367-377.

~~ The Journal of Psychiatry reports that if you are going to develop manic-depression, the symptoms will show much sooner if you have AD/HD. Sacks, G. et.al. (2000). American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 157(3), 466-468.

~~ Buffalo State College researched the ADHD child's ability to identify emotions. Using pictures, video, and audio tapes, they found that non-ADHD children were quite competent in identifying emotion in others while ADHD children were severely impaired in the skill. Norvilitus, et. al. (2000). Journal of Attention Disorders, vol. 4(1), 15-26.

~~ Several long term studies have been tracking the inattention curve in ADHD children as they grow. Inattention in ADHD children peaks between the age of 7 and 8. After that it tends to stabilize through adolescence and adulthood. Hyperactivity frequently disappears between the ages of 7 and 9. ADD does not. Hart, E. et. al. (2000). Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol 28(3), 311. Biederman, J. et.al. (2000). American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 157(5), 816-818.

~~ A Purdue University study of 120 boys, aged 7-13 years shows some typical work patterns in ADHD children. The study compared boys with ADHD to non-ADHD peers in a work/problem solving activity. The study found that ADHD boys were less effective in social interactions, but interestingly, were also less frustrated and less helpless than their non-ADHD peers. Children with ADHD were more likely to attribute any success they had to "luck" or simply the ease of the task. Non-ADHD children in the study tended to blame failures on themselves, in that they didn't "try hard enough." Haza, et. al. (2000)Child Development, vol 71(2) 432-446.

~~ Despite rumor to the contrary, ADHD children are NOT more at-risk for substance abuse than their non- ADHD peers. However, if the ADHD is coupled with a Conduct Disorder, then the ADHD child is more at risk for substance-abuse. Molina, et. al. (1999). Psychology Addictive Behaviors, vol. 13(4) 348 - 358.

~~ High School teachers have a wide range of attitudes toward children with ADHD and LD (learning disabilities). According to a survey of both regular and special educators, 46% thought that ADHD children would carry a multitude of problems into adulthood. 13% thought that learning disabilities resulted from parents "spoiling" their children. 95% thought that LD students are entitled to a more lenient education. Brook, et. al. (2000). Patient Education & Counseling, vol. 40(3), 247-252.

~~ Leroux and Levitt-Perlman write in the Roeper Review that we are focusing on the wrong side of ADHD. They criticize that research and articles always emphasize the negative aspects of the disorder, when in fact, many characteristics of ADHD resemble those of gifted and talented persons as well as resembling creative talents such as divergent thinking. Leroux & Levitt-Perlman (2000). Roeper Review, vol. 22(3) 171-176.

~~ Can children with ADHD comprehend television and video to the same degree as non-ADHD? Apparently not, according to the University of Kentucky. In a study with 7-12 year olds, attention decreased sharply during a video, especially when distractors such as toys were present. This inattention meant that while the ADHD children could recall basic facts of the story afterward, they had a much lower understanding of the relationships among the events in the story. Lorch et.al. (2000). J. of Abnormal Psych., vol 109(2), 321-330.

~~ New findings in EEG patterns may soon give a more valid diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Researchers in Australia have found distinct EEG patterns in the brains of children with ADHD. The unique EEG waves show an immature, hypoaroused central nervous system. Clarke, A. (2002). Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol 113(7), 1036-1044.

~~ Diagnosing pre-schoolers with ADHD seems to some to be inaccurate, unnecessary and perhaps even detrimental. A study from Dalhousie University in Halifax shows just the opposite. They observed 50, 3 to 6 year olds in a preschool setting, half diagnosed with ADHD and half not. The ADHD children were off-task significantly more time than the non-ADHD children. They were also much more talkative and active. Their conclusion: early diagnosis of ADHD appears valid and may be useful in establishing behavioral programs at an early age to help these children be successful. DeWolfe, N, et. al. 2000. Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol 4(2), 80-90.

~~ Children who have ADHD coupled with Conduct Disorder apparently really just have a version of Conduct Disorder rather than an complication of attention deficit. New research out of Toronto shows that the inhibitory control problems seen in ADHD children are not found in ADHD children who also have conduct disorder (ADHD+CD). In lab tasks where children are tested on their ability to stop an ongoing activity, only the "plain" ADHD children are severely impaired. So the ADHD+CD should really just be CD children who have attention problems as well. Schachar, et. al. 2000. J. of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol 28(3), 227-235.

~~ A study at the University of Pittsburgh school of Medicine shows that middle school children with ADHD are no more at risk for substance abuse than their non-ADHD classmates. However, these children are more at risk if the ADHD was coupled with Conduct Disorder. Molina, et.al. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 1999, vol. 13(4), 348-358.

~~ Persons with bi-polar disorder (manic- depression) have an earlier onset of symptoms if they also have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This is according to a study out of Massachusetts General Hospital. Sachs, G. et.al. 2000. Am. Journal of psychiatry. vol. 157(3), 466-468.

~~ Two studies support concern for ADHD individuals into adolescence and adulthood. Curran et. al, (1999) found a high percentage of the prison population has ADHD (9% of prisoners vs. 2.5% of young adults in the general population). Clure, et. l (1999) found that among inpatients for substance use disorder (alcohol and/or cocaine use), 32% met the criteria for ADHD, and that 35% of those inpatients had a childhood diagnosisi of ADHD and continued to have problems with it into adulthood. Clure, et. al, (1999). American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. vol. 25(3), 441-448.

Curran, et. al., (1999). American Journal of Psychiatry. vol. 156(10), 1664-1665.

~~ The University of Wisconsin has published a study tracking students with ADHD into college. They found that college students with ADHD were more likely to be on academic probation and had a higher incidence of academic problems than their peers. The study claimed that the problems experienced by these students were similar to those of a learning disorder.

There are hundreds more studies out there. The website you posted above is not from a leading expert and is not research based. It looked to me like anti-add medication propaganda. There are tons of these sites out there, because like you, people have had bad experiences. But don't spread misinformation to overcome your childhood.

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Jane Wilkinson
Joined Oct 01, 2007
Posts: 5

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Posted:Nov 07, 2008 1:13:46 PM

I would agree that not everything that looks like ADHD is. You may want to consider whether your son is having great difficulty with understanding. When an individual constantly looses the thread of what is being said or what is being read, their mind naturally goes on to something else.

For many students with this problem, homework is the nightmare you mentioned. At the end of the evening, with whatever you get done, you still have the feeling that your son didn't really learn anything that will hold on until the next time.

Look for these four behaviors:
He can read words, but then still doesn't really get the whole idea, doesn't understand what he has read.
When he tries to tell you something, does it tend to be confusing and you ask all kinds of questions to get the meaning?
When he has to write something longer than a couple of sentences, like a book report, is that a brutal task for him and for you? Even if he gets something written down, is it real disconnected or striped down?
When he has to read a book for a book report, is he constantly distracted...has to get a drink of water, plays with the dog, etc.

If you see this cluster of behaviors, you son may need help with listening and reading comprehension. It is extremely frustrating to a child when he just doesn't know what is going on and finds it hard to communicate with others. All kinds of behavior can arise.

Take a look at these two websites for more information on helping him grasp, understand and remember more. (And give YOU a break with some tools that can make your efforts more successful.) MindPrime has info at http://www.understandMORE.com and Lindamood Bell is at http://www.lindamood-bell.com .

Fortunately, if you see the above four behaviors, there is a light at the end of the tunnel and help is available.
Jane Wilkinson

Jane Wilkinson understandMORE.com

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
Posts: 424

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Posted:Nov 08, 2008 7:31:10 PM

Oh, You are quite correct! There *ARE* plenty that do. I don't recall ever denying that fact. It just seems that far too frequently before other methods are tried medication is reached for when in the vast majority of cases according to the guy who named the *disorder* (Called a disorder due to the lack of conlusive,organic evidence as of yet identified indicating that it even exists.) I am NOT denying there are some who exhibit over activity and all the other alleged symptoms related. I just have my doubts after over 20 years of study that has proven conslusively nothing (as it is still called a disorder rather than a disease.) That there is anything to discover. It seems more likely to me, that perhaps those who have the symptoms have some other things in common as well? Also the method of diagnosis is not scientifically credible in nature. It is entirely subjective. Many studies that have been done are not credible as they were not clean and later the drugs that those that were the study group with ADHD were on through the study and often in many cases for years BEFORE the study have been proven to really be the more likely culprit of whatever the original study indicated as the 'disorder.' I suppose what it really boils down to is, i don't believe they are looking for it in the right way in the right place and i don't think they will ever find it there.

I take something. I love my medicine. I was a 27 year old woman though when i started to take it. A far cry from an 8 year old with a still developing brain that is at risk of MUCH severe damage from these "medicines" not to mention the potential not fully understood danger to the whole brain development process. I think it is more prudent, to try other methods for some time before turning to a pill. I whole heartedly agree though that even when it comes to children there are *SOME* (few) cases that likely truly DO require medication. I find it irresponsible of the medical profession to be doing it's drug testing on children half the time without telling the parents or the child they are part of a drug study. Also, i think medication is way too over prescribed and as it is used over all in society does more harm than good. Not saying it can't do good in certain cases and situations etc...

This disorder is far too over diagnosed largely because of it's totally subjective diagnosis methods. And the far too often inflicted on parents by a whole host of different ppl involved with the process. I suspect this will one day go down in history as another witch hunt atleast in the case of ADHD. They tested my mother and they say she has not got it. Neither has my father. But, their behavior actually matches the profile alot miore even than mine. I think to some degree, it is just a set of learned behaviors children suck up like sponges. I think far too few studies have been done on the issue of nurture and focused on nature instead With a lack of *CONCLUSIVE* evidence yet put forth. If you don't agree with that take it up with NIMH. They will say that much the same about conclusive evidence infact they have. Anyway, Too much is made of this disorder in most cases and as a result children are being mistreated though ofcourse everyone is trying to help and not hurt. The road to hell is paved with good intentions ya know?

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naturaldocmom
Joined Nov 23, 2008
Posts: 16

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Posted:Nov 28, 2008 8:29:21 AM

My son was suspected by the public school "experts" that he had ADD/ADHD. I was subjected to 3 meetings of roundtables with 8 people telling me my son needed medication. Although I am not opposed to medication, I personally see symptoms as a result of a greater, underlying issue. We put my son in a private school which was based on learning by doing which helped. Over the last 6 years, there have been a combination of strategies and therapies which have helped him. Also, it turns out, my son wasn't ADD, but APD--Auditory Processing Disorder. He wasn't officially diagnosed until he was 11. His outbursts were due to tremendous frustration.

What has helped (without medication) emotional therapy, speech therapy, hand/eye therapy sessions of at different times, over 6 years where he has learned strategies for coping and new skills.

For the body: we limit junkie carbs and he drinks a lot of water. Hydrating the brain does a lot for the body's balance. He takes extra B complex vitamins and Flaxseed oil for Omega 3s. He also takes a supplement sold on Amazon.com which has amino acids, herbs, minerals and vitamins key to brain activity and calmness, learning, memory. We have seen a big difference in him.

http://www.amazon.com/Supplement-Learning-Contains-Vitamins-Guaranteed/dp/B001BGJGQG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1227878731&sr=8-1

We make sure he gets enough sleep as if he doesn't, he behavior is poor the next day. We provide a quiet study area in his room which is free from distractions.

He also starting playing Rock Band from XBox 360. This has really helped train his brain. The visual beat, the sound beat and striking the drum seem to be helping his brain make some new connections.

In summary, there isn't a "magic bullet" but a combination of structuring his life so that his mind, body and spirit are adjusted to his abilities. Our goal is to help him realize his potential. He is coping better each year and starting to bloom as a person.

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