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DRHD...


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Joined: Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172
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Posted Apr 29, 2008 at 11:31:15 PM
Subject: DRHD...

Just curious..... do you work for a school district?

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DMS
Joined Jan 25, 2007
Posts: 22

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Posted:Apr 30, 2008 8:56:13 AM
Subject:DRHD...

Kathryn,

I just wrote a well planned reply and the darn thing did not send.

LOL!

I will attempt to rewrite it now:

I am wondering why you ask if DRHD works for a school district. It would seem like that would be a good thing.

I have read many of DRHD recent posts and have found them to be accurate and spot on with the replies.

To me it makes no matter if DRHD works for a school district of even if DRHD is a lawyer. It only matters that what DRHD posts is accurate.

Sometimes we as parents want to fight... but we do not always know the rules to the fight. After all, you would not show up to "gun" fight with only your "fists" would you? (I do not advocate violence when "fighting" with the schools, LOL)

As parents, we often feel that if we "sue" or take a school district to "due process" that this will correct all the wrongs and our children will then, very quickly, get what they NEED. I do not think this is how those processes work. Often, a school will stop assisting a child or drag their feet even MORE when a parent takes this approach. AND it cost the parents tons more money than it will the school district and they know that. This works to the schools advantage... not the child's.

Parents see their child and the child's needs. We want to make things better NOW for them. We do not want them to hurt in anyway... same with me and my 2 kids! But, parents (me at times included) often base our next steps on either emotions or FEAR (yes, that is also an emotion) when we really need to base our next step on accurate information. DRHD has to my reading only provided accurate information. It is sometimes hard to hear. We want people to support us and our child and our position and our version of the facts. But, we are the parents... we do care and we do see things differently than the school... that is part of being a parent.

Part of being an advocate for our kids is to step back and take a non-emotional look at the situation and ask for help. Hopefully, the replies we get back are accurate... it is nice when people agree with us and how we want to go about things but to me it is more important to understand the rules of the fight at hand.

In one recent post, DRHD wrote something to the effect that the Spec Ed teacher was part of the problem and that this was why that teacher was being shut out of meetings. I get that. I took that to mean: hey, the way you were trying to assist that child did not work... learn the way your building "fights" and use the school's rules (or politics or culture) to work for the child using the current system... do not buck it so intently. This was a new teacher and has a lot to learn. The heart is there. But the reality is if that teacher does not learn the rules of that school she will not be as good an advocate that she can be for her students during the meetings. I do not doubt that this is a good teacher. I bet she is!

I post here to get good accurate information. That is what I attempt to do for others.

I commend you on your advocating for your child or children.

I do not know DRHD. Do not know if DRHD works for a school district or is a lawyer. It makes no difference to me as long as the information is accurate.

Wouldn't it be a GOOD thing if DRHD did work for a school district? We are benefiting from DRHD's experiences and knowledge. There might be a good reason to listen to what DRHD has to post.

It is not my intent to ever offend or to be hurtful to anyone on this group. I am sorry if what I have to reply you do not take the way I have intended.

Hugs to you,

DMS :-)

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:Apr 30, 2008 3:40:55 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

I was just curious, thus the beginning of my post "just curious...." I was not implying anything wrong with that person's posts, but I do find it interesting that you responded the way you did, which tells me that you were probably thinking along the same lines that I was thinking.

Hugs back to you!

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:May 01, 2008 7:30:26 AM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

DMS and Kathryn,

Thank you very much for your kind comments on those areas that I have commented in this forum. Providing correct information to a parent is proper and I would not want to do anything different. I am just amazed at the amount of misinformation that "floats" out there in cyberspace. This forum I have observed is no different. Parents have a lot of influence to be a change agent. The challenge is to channel their energies in constructive ways to be a collaborator. Parents and school districts in matters related to special education must be a part of the solution and never a part of the problem.

DRHD

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:May 01, 2008 1:09:21 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

I completely agree. Unfortunately parents do not always feel a part of the process, as in our case. Everything is done for us and there never seems to be room for parent input. In our school, 95% of parents don't care to be a participant, unfortunately, so I think they are not really sure how to include parents except to invite them to meetings, read them the pre-written IEP and ask them to sign it.

The problem that we seem to run into is that the district's hands are tied because of budgetary reasons. They get very defensive when it comes to condoning any kind of therapies that they don't normally provide, even to the point where a parent like me wants to provide it on our own and not ask the district for funds, they still must be very careful in choosing their words for fear that we might come along and "make them pay". I have never once asked for them to pay for anything, but legally they have to protect themselves and I understand that. I DON'T BLAME THE DISTRICT FOR THAT, but at the same time I feel as if I am being spoonfed information so that they can protect themselves. My daughter has made great strides thanks to our private therapist and instead of including her as part of the team they say "well, we're not paying for it so we cannot include it in her IEP." I get it and I understand it from their perspective, but at least acknowledge that it is helping. And at the very least, don't read us a letter stating that they will charge us with truancy for taking her out of school for private services 2 mornings/week. I would think they could look the other way instead of threatening us. They told me the only condition that they would allow us to continue private therapy during school hours is if we relinquish financial responsibility. I did not do that and they have not acted on their threats, so they probably are looking the other way, but it felt so threatening to tell us that at an IEP meeting.

The advice given to me by the principal was "keep doing what you're doing." and the advocate said the same thing. She stated clearly "they will NOT do anything to you." In our case, I am never going to pursue a due process hearing for any reason. I want to provide help to my daughter on my own. I just want the district to back off and let us do what we do. It's not a case where I am going after them for anything at all and as far as I know, they would not take us to due process either because of the financial burden it would cause them. So we're sort of at a stalemate. My daughter gets mediocre speech therapy at school, so we get private therapy on our own, but since we feel it is part of her education we want to do it during school hours.

I sort of feel as if we're in the opposite situation as most people in that most people are demanding the school do more, where I am demanding that they do less and let me do more. Kind of weird.

I also understand that kids with special needs are entitled to an appropriate education, not the best that money can buy and I get that the district is not obligated to kids who reside in other districts, but I also feel sad when there doesn't seem to be compassion for a child who is asked to leave a school at the end of a school year because of the lack of obligation.

Anyway, thanks for your posts.
Kathryn

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always_wondering
Joined Jun 12, 2003
Posts: 94

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Posted:May 01, 2008 3:20:03 PM
Subject:DRHD...

"The challenge is to channel their energies in constructive ways to be a collaborator. Parents and school districts in matters related to special education must be a part of the solution and never a part of the problem."

But what if it is the school or school district that is the problem, not the parent? What if what the parent is asking is completely reasonable and legal?

What a wonderful world it would be if the schools my children attend would actually collaborate. From the start, I believe my school's idea of collaboration meant for me to keep my mouth shut and don't bring up any problems. Don't question the fact my child can't read or write because the teacher is the expert and I am a parent who doesn't know what I'm talking about. (Never mind the fact that I have a dyslexic brother and am involved parent that works with my child. So, I knew that if there are no picture my child couldn't read a word, and when my child was privately assessed he was 2 years behind but his report card grades were good.)

Some schools do not participate in collaboration. The schools go through the motions to cover their behinds and deny any request made of the parents whether reasonable or not. Unless the parents know all of the nuances of the law or can afford someone who does, their child does not receive an appropriate education that is specifically designed for the unique needs of the child with a disability. I'm not talking about some off the wall program. But, in some schools, if your child needs (I'm talking single digit percentile scores) reading remediation tailored to their unique needs past elementary school (by that I mean, a proven program that works for students with SLD), it will not be made available without going to mediation or due process. If your child need math help. Forget it, no child I know has had a program designed for children with disabiltiies and the teachers rely on tricks instead of different teaching methods (at least in our elementary school, MS and HS). As you go up higher in grades, any hope of remediation or programs that teach subjects in a different manner are non-existant. They just accommodate and modify the heck out of the classes and say your kid is doing great.

Since there are so many affluent people in this area, they just end up giving up and getting outside remediation for their children because they don't really have any other choice.

When you ask for anything intensive or specifically designed, they tell you they have this class that.... These classes are designed for the gen ed population or lower functioning children, not ones with in the middle with SLD.

When you deal with schools like this and your above average child is years behind in a basic skill because the school refuses to remediate because they don't have programs at the school for that, how do you collaborate? I guess in my child's school I would be part of the solution if I just sat by and said yes to them and allowed my child to graduate from high school without being able to read past an elemenary level. Shame for the kid who is as bright as mine.

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:May 01, 2008 5:53:05 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

I think what DRHD is saying is that the parents need to get on board with what the schools and districts do best TO AVOID CONTROVERSY. With that I disagree. If that happened then it would be like there is no competition. Everyone would get a substandard education because it's "appropriate". What I am saying is that they do not have the resources, so I choose not to fight for all the hundreds of kids who do not have an advocate. I just need to do what I can for my child and I want the district to BACK OFF.

Always Wondering is right, they do NOT remediate. I know for a fact from experience. They teach the kids tricks to get them to pass tests and to do the work, but the kids don't necessarily understand what they are doing. For our school touch math is a prime example. It teaches the kids to add without having to count on their fingers or with cubes, but they are reluctant to teach basic number sense because it takes too long and they don't have the resources.

My point above is that they simply don't have the programs like Always Wondering pointed out and if they provide a special program for one child, everyone will want it. I wanted to do Fast ForWord for my daughter AT OUR OWN EXPENSE and the district psych said "It hasn't been tested on a model like your daughter." That was a classic safe answer from their standpoint. At least be honest and say "We don't provide that program, but would love to hear about your experience with it." But who cares about that stuff. We did it on our own anyway because we are very fortunate enough to have the funds to pay for these programs. Other people are not so lucky and the parents are not savvy and do not have money to pay for an advocate. Those are the kids I feel sorry for.

All of this has caused me a GREAT DEAL of distrust with our district. I don't even want to bother rebuilding that trust either. I just want to do my own thing and forget about their policies.

Kathryn

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:May 01, 2008 8:35:07 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

I too have enjoyed reading your missives of the various issues in these forums. Kathryn, in particular, you appear to have a nice perspective on the way things should be and your opinions seem grounded in a reasonable way. Many of you have a pleasant consistent level of sincere advocacy for the plight of parents to promote their appropriate level of education that disabled children deserve. Conflict is difficult no matter what caused it or how it came about. But for every conflict there are effective resolutions.

Please allow me to comment on the nature of conflict that seems to be prevalent between parents and school districts. The local school districts and the persons that comprise the key players in making special education decisions are truly an interesting lot. I would be less than honest if I didn't state that some of these key players discharge their duties and responsibilities better than others. This filters down to teaching staff and the building administrator level. Conflict resolution is typically a systemic weakness in the school setting in matters related to special education. It falls short because the skill set is generally not there and the confrontation that usually ensues is one that could have easily been prevented.

The irony of most conflicts that do take place is a complete breakdown between the school district and the parent having difficulty to clearly articulate the problem area and it's effective resolution. It's almost as if both know what they want to say to each other and it just doesn't get communicated in an effective manner. As a result, there is a breakdown that ends in dispute, an impasse, and/or frustration. Then ultimately both the parent and the school district close their ranks and a complete breakdown of any resolution remains What a vicious and rediculous chain of events that places the child squarely in the middle.

Hence, the bottom line, is that it all stems back to how concerns , needs, and issues are communicated related to the desired services for the child. Somewhere between two extremes of what a parent desires for their child and what a school district is willing to do for the child is where both parties have to exist. This is reached through clear and effective communications from both parties. Trust breeds trust as much as distrust breeds contempt.

DRHD

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:May 01, 2008 11:05:23 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

Your reply is well said. The problem is that I have found our district unwilling to compromise on even the slightest thing. Like changing 1 component of 1 goal they would not budge. And I felt that they dug their heels in the second they got there. The IEP was done when we got to the meeting no matter how many times they stamped the word "draft" on it. The only reason I wanted to be part of the goal writing is because I work so hard with my daughter at home and wanted to focus on certain things with her using certain types of programs and strategies.

There was a lot of stuff said at our meeting including 1 comment made by the resource specialist who at one point looked over at the program specialist and said "I thought you told me to write this!!" she (PS) gave her (RS) a look that would kill and the resource specialist did not say another word for a long time. I know it's anecdotal, but it's representative of the kind of things that cause me to distrust these people, but at the same time, I really just want to do my own thing with her. The only reason I am not home schooling her is because she loves her friends at school so much and wants to be there and it's a good thing because of her speech issues. And it's not because I hate the school, but because I get so much joy from working with my daughter and teaching her and watching her learn. I know her inside and out and I know what works for her and what doesn't.

The other issue which has already been discussed is that this is extremely emotional for parents and not for school staff. They go home at the end of the day to their families and live their lives. We have to live with our decisions on a daily basis and in a personal way. I'm sure this has a lot to do with why conflict is so hard.

I think you also see a lot of "entitlement" issues that are so common in this country in general and maybe even more so when it comes to special ed because we feel we need to fight for our special needs kids since they cannot fight for themselves yet. It's mama bear and entitlement put together. I believe that educating my children is my job and I have the use of the schools to do it, but whatever is lacking in the schools I will pick up on my own.

Kathryn

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always_wondering
Joined Jun 12, 2003
Posts: 94

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Posted:May 02, 2008 11:56:38 AM

Thank you, Kathryn. I know I am not an effective communicator and I appreciate your willingness to forgo my lack of eloquence in order to see my points and recognize them.

I do agree that DRHD does state proper information when responding to specific laws. The explanation if IEEs was thorough. I also agree that effective communication on the part of both schools and parents is the most effective way to resolve issues. However, putting this into practice is another matter. I would love to hear your views, DRHD, regarding putting this effective communication into practice from both points of view, from the parent side and the school side when dealing with a system that does not always play by the rules.

[Modified by: always_wondering on May 02, 2008 04:24 PM]

[Modified by: always_wondering on May 02, 2008 04:29 PM]

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:May 03, 2008 6:34:13 AM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

Kathryn, DMS, and Always Wondering,

Last evening I wrote a message to the three of you that addressed special education funding and finance and how this works, regulatory impact of IDEA and the No Child Left Behind legislation upon school districts and it's implications to children with disabilities, and clarification of the use of the complaint process as compared to the use of a costly due process hearing. I wrote the message and I lost every bit of it. I was quite frustrated and just turned my computer off. I felt like you DMS when you did the same thing.

Well,today for me is golf day and I will be doing my level best to reconstruct the same information today or tomorrow. Have a nice weekend.

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:May 03, 2008 9:07:42 AM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

Kathryn, DMS, and Almost Wondering,

I have decided to post a message to you before I go out to the golf course and make a complete fool of myself. I will not attempt to redo my original message as it was much too detailed. I will provide you with some overall concept highlights that touches many of what i sense are questions in your mind as to how and why school districts act and do as they do. Here goes:

1) Funding for public education is the foremost challenge for school districts. The pie is only so big and only stretches so far. Parents oftntimes think there is an unlimited source of funds to meet needs as requested. Here is the usual distribution of funds that flow to a school district: Federal: 3-5 %; State: 30-35 %; Local Effort ( your tax dollar ): 55-60 %. So the bottom line is that if generally, 85% of any school district budget is spent for instructional purposes, there isn't a whole lot of discretionary funds to fund much of anything without additional appropriations from the governing body and the end result is that ulltimately comes from your pocket. A catch 22, huh.

2)Parents and school districts sit down to address IEP issues, parental requests for services, and other IEE findings and recommendations. The bottom line of all these discussions is that whatever is being contemplated must be reasonably calculated to provide a benefit to a child with a disability. This is referred to as the Rowley Standard. Go and Google it and read the Supreme Court decision and frankly attempt to understand it. This is critical in your plight to seek services for your children. This is the tiered test applied to all disputes between parents and due process hearings. In sum, you need to be asking two questions in your discussions: !) What and/or how that which is being proposed is reasonably calculated or determined? and 2) How will my child receive benefit from what you are proposing that he is not already receiving? This is the bottom line and all things evolve from this discussion and all things are measured against these two constructs in matters related to a free appropriate public education (FAPE) for a child with a disability. I challenge you to review a judicial opinion ofr a Hearing Officer who is adjudicating a FAPE issue tha the Rowley standard is not addressed.

My friends, I must go. Have a nice day.

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
Posts: 424

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Posted:May 22, 2008 4:54:06 PM
Subject:DRHD...

Sometimes how something works is deeply flawed and for that reason would be better to be changed. The only way that change happens is when it is directly confronted.

I don't think parents are the part of the process that they should be. I think school systems take advantage and i think they take more advantage of those parents who don't have lucrative incomes. Schools, are as much a financial institution as any other. I think too that fact is never far from their minds. I find that far too often the financial well being of the school plays a larger roll than the parent. To me this is a broken system.

As for sueing, there is a time and a place.... There is an art to having good judgement and getting good advice, part of good advice is that it be accurate, which Dr's is....

But the helplesness that parents can feel doesn't come close to reflecting that of the children who are NOT part of any of it. Teachers who try to help and offer alternative advice even, are very valuable. There are many sides to every issue. What i read here scares me as it sounds like a discussion of how to, 'handle' the parents. But maybe my view is somewhat inacurate....

The rules of these things are twistable as are all rules. And often enough the school system does the initial twisting.

My parents tried to get me helpat one point. They ended up having to sue the school system. Before they even filed or threatened to file...

The school system knew it didnt want to pay for what i needed. So they decided there was a quick simple easy solution.

They sent me to some woman that i will refer to as Dr. D because i have not seen her in years and i don't want to slander anyone and for all i know the situation has changed. But anyway, Dr.D, sat me down and forced me to take a 'test' It was unlike any LD test i had ever seen. It was totally rigged and there was no way to answer the questions without my answers being used against my family. The questions were double ended. To quote one of the more horrifying, "Does your daddy sexually abuse you on mondays or tuesdays." then you have 2 boxes to check yes or no. Well i refused to answer such questions,I even tried to leave and found the door blocked by a 260 pound 6 foot woman. I am 5'1 and 100lbs... And she was very threatening in her stance and i was only about 15. So i sat down to answer the questions i could answer without answering something that was a trick question.

When i was done she took my questionare test thing, and proceeded to scream and holler at me. Because od the whole 25 cents it was gonna cost the school to have this processed and not enough of the questions are answered to make it worthwhile. Well I reached in my pocket and handed her a quarter and politely told her that i was answering no more of these questions, as i didn't think even most of the questions i had answered were any of the schools business but the double ended questions presented have no answer that in any way applies to my situation. She held me hostage hollering and throwing tantrums and throwing things and punching stone walls for the next 5 hours. Before i was finally allowed to go. This woman, introduced herself as Dr. D and was introduced by the school to my parents as Dr. D.

Later, After she wrote this terrible report about what a freak of nature i am even though she never talking about me with me and only screached at me about answering bogus unanswerable questions, i found out, at that time anyway, "Dr." D had no PHD and her masters wasn't even in the area in which she was working.

The school was going to use that test to say my parents were abusing me. That was what the whole point of this test was. To show that in their care i was using drugs and cutting school they can't control me... But i am not a bade kid because any child who is beaten and sexually abused by their father would be just as messed up it is imperative for me to be placed in the custody of the state!

All to avoid paying for the things i needed that my parents were asking for. So rules are often broken and school systems are not above defrauding parents. I think they are perfectly right to look for every opinion they can get! The system as it is, is stacked against the parent and the student and it needs to be changed. However, everything that has been said about the current system that is, is completely accurate from what i know as well.

Parents can have and often do have legitimate grievances the way you talk about it really trivializes that i think anyway. And they are part of the system and the meetings, but they are not as much a part as they should be. And when the school system cheats... And does underhanded stuff, which truly is hardly unheard of or uncommon, when you have waaited a long time already for them to get moving as they are already dragging their heels.... Sueing them senseless seems to me in such cases quite called for. The people you meet with as a parent, have an obligation to keep the school's best interests in mind, only the parents are there to protect the child's interests. When no reasonable compromise can be reached and it is your child having problems.... Often too schools are pulling the wool over the eyes of disadvantaged parents... Who can't fight them So they offer nothing the parent demands something and they offer some super small concession and the kid grows up and is illiterate at age 30. Schools today in my opinion spend more time worrying about their finances than the education they are providing our kids. Our students rank last in a recent study of the education of all children in the western world, we were 29th or somethin. whic is last. The children of Finland ranked in the top 5 for happiness and number 1 in education. I speak finnish. My fiance is finnish i have many friends and future family members of various ages living in various parts of the nation of Finland and not a single one of those kids in highschoolo gets more than a half hour of homework a night. And in the usa kids frequently get between 4 and 6 hours a night. Every aspect of our education system is busted. And our children rank same for happiness as they do for education. Least happy in the world. Maybe every child should get an IEP as it seems just about no one is gettin educated anyway... Imagine what that would cost the schools. Schools should be about education rather than stock piling money.... And parents , have a legal obligation to protect their kids from harm. In many cases, what the school offers is harmful to the children who need help, as it is more obsessed with money than the well being of the child. If that is part of the system than parents need far more involvement to protect the interests of their kids.

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:May 22, 2008 11:49:28 PM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

I have heard so many horror stories that nothing would surprise me at this point. I have made it a point to do whatever I can to educate my daughter. The hardest part for me is to stand up to these baracudas and hold my head high and walk through the school as if I own the place. I just have to put the negative stuff out of my mind and go about my business. I've decided to take all of this past year and place it on a menu. From there I will pick and choose what I want and be done with it. I do not have to order liver and onions just because it appears on a menu and I do not have to take the crappy self contained classroom CLEAR ACROSS TOWN that my daughter has no business being in just because it is financially better for the school district than having her get 1:1 help from the resource specialist at our home school where she is doing well, is happy and has lots of friends.

I'm sure, we have a good thing going. I'm saying a big fat "NO THANK YOU" to the bad. For us it's not about suing. It's about trying to filter out the good from bad.

Kathryn

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funinthesun
Joined Sep 23, 2008
Posts: 4

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Posted:Oct 08, 2008 1:56:40 AM
Subject:DRHD...

Kathyrn ... I am one of those parents who no longer trust the school district. I truly believe that their intentions are not the best for my child but the best (or easiest) for the administration and saves the most money. I have a child whose disabilities are not severe and I am very lucky for that. None the less they are real disabilities. I know that when I got to "battle", because that's what it always seems like, I sometimes think wow all of this for something as simple as extended time to complete the assignment. Just so we don't feel left out .... and he wants to do the whole thing himself ... and they want to make it into a big blown out ordeal. Why? When it comes down to ... we are doing between 2 1/2 - 3 1/2 hours of homework EVERY night and the modifications aren't being implemented what's next? How many times do you have to send an email requesting they please follow something in the IEP? All I want to know is why does it have to be so hard? And you know what, it isn't just this year, it was last year, and the year before, and the year before that ... and so on. It's like the same fight every single year. Really? I think are you serious? Each year as I go thru the exact same thing this is even funnier - for the exact same thing. Its like I want to say to my IEP team, come on guys we are all adults ...you expect the kids to fall into their routine with in a week or so ... it's the end of the first quarter and you still can't get it! Go figure, I am going to have to get an attorney and you know why? Because we have organizational issues, and we can't get anyone to help us make sure we get our homework written down properly in our planner - with the due dates ... can you believe that? That's a pretty extreme request isn't it?

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Kathryn
Joined Oct 02, 2006
Posts: 172

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Posted:Oct 08, 2008 2:42:30 AM
Subject:Re: DRHD...

Funinthesun, I feel for you. I'm not sure what grade your child is in, but I have heard horror stories, especially about middle and high school, because they have so many teachers at that point. There should be a resource specialist who is the point person. I'm not sure what kind of a plan you are on. I fear middle school because I fear a lack of control. Now I have the opportunity to pick the teacher I want for my daughter and to talk to the teacher during the summer, before school even begins and say "This is how it is....." and then follow up as much as I can and be there on a regular basis. Lots of face time with the teacher.

I would recommend a formal letter rather than an e-mail. I'm not sure how threatening I would be at this point, but sometimes you can do things like cc: the special ed director or send your letter to the Special Ed Director and let them know that you are running out of options because you have requested time and time again that the IEP be followed and yet it is not. You could certainly request an IEP meeting, bring an advocate with you and just show that you are very serious about the IEP being followed.

Let us know how it goes.

Kathryn

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Mandi
Joined May 05, 2008
Posts: 424

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Posted:Oct 08, 2008 3:01:29 AM
Subject:DRHD...

Sorry to but in but i just wanted to point something out.... Because someone mentioned it... *Everyone*(I mean *everyone* not just those with LD) Gets a substandard education in our system. Because the system is defunct to begin with so expecting the specialized stuff to function when even the run of the mills stuff doesn't is just wishfull thinking. The system sux and needs a total overhaul.

If you don't believe me check out this study. Believe Fox
http://www.newsfox.com/pte.mc?pte=041207026

http://www.oecd.org/document/28/0,3343,en_2649_34487_34010524_1_1_1_1,00.html

http://www.economist.com/world/international/displaystory.cfm?story_id=9989914

lalalala Just saying that our education system needs a total overhaul. Because it kinda does.... Even Fox agrees with me. We rank i do believe it is lowest in the western world. Shame on us! And this is AFTER no child left behind. I guess no child qualifies anymore as a child. After all childhood is what god invented Ritalin to cure. Soooo No more kiddies here in the USA. How can we educate what we don't possess? Just to be a bit sarcastic about the whole thing and drive my point further home that we are miserable we fail our children and what is worse we allow others to fail our children day in and day out. It seems though that those labled with LD get failed even worse than the rest. Yes no child left behind sure sure lets just shove 'em through the cracks and deny they exist and have needs at all instead or lets medicate them out of childhood to get around the 'child' factor. I mean it is no child left behind not no over medicated zombie left behind.... We should all be ashamed! Our system should be ashamed and if we were in China i would assume the whole system would be off committing seppucu however it is spelled to make up for it's failure. Our kids deserve better. LD or not. They deserve the best that we can give them it is a sick world we live in when our government is cutting taxes for the wealthiest 2% of the population, funding a massively expensive and entirely bogus and groundless war in iraq while *all* our children are getting short changed. And here we are sitting here trying to figure out how to work with the system. Sorry when my computer crashes i don't sit there wondering hmmm how do i work with it while the mouse doesn't work and the screen isn't updating. I shut it down and reboot the damn thing and run some major updates.

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