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Reading instruction for hearing impaired--PattiM?


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69140
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Posted Mar 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 AM
Subject: Reading instruction for hearing impaired--PattiM?

EMAILNOTICES>noPASSWORD>aa.WKuN.MsKscHey PattiM, I know you're one of the experts here, anyone else feel free to point me in the right direction too! Am I right in thinking that Lindamood Bell is particularly appropriate for instructing children with hearing impairments? The child in question has only been hearing (with the help of hearing aids) for about two years, and is just beginning to speak (quite clearly, too). I'm thinking that if the extra instruction in phonics he's getting doesn't do the trick, his parents need to know about multisensory programs that might. I'm not really in a position to recommend anything without stepping on many toes, but I think this kid needs to be tested for phonemic awareness. Time is wasting, he's going to be in 3rd grade.

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 25, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

PASSWORD>aaI221mi7wL3IPat Lindamood worked with hearing impaired youngsters and I have found the LiPS program to work quite well with my own hearing impaired daughter when a visual method by the deaf and hard of hearing specialist didn't. My daughter was just ending 3rd grade when I did LiPS with her. She has other challenges besides just being hearing impaired, one of which is having ADD.I have been a Teaching Assistant in the college phonetics class. My professor and I have been shocked at the number of "whole language" walking wounded who can't even count syllables, tell me where the accent is, or let alone tell me how many sounds they hear in a syllable! It is absolutely the most incredible thing to see these grown adults struggle with something that my hearing impaired daughter can do without batting an eye. Infact, I showed them a video of her doing the vowel circle and said, "If a hearing-impaired dyslexic child can do this you can too." I am going to be using the LiPS pictures with the particular students so that they can connect what is going on with the articulation of the phonemes. I will let you know what happens but PA is essential for these students if they want to be speech pathologists.

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 25, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: Pat Lindamood worked with hearing impaired youngsters and I have
: found the LiPS program to work quite well .....I am wondering if anyone has experience using these programs with non-verbal (but not hearing impaired) children? Since most programs require oral repetition of sounds, how does one address this with a non-verbal (extremely poor oral-motor skills) person? I have two non-verbal children and know of many more with the same syndrome as my children (Joubert Syndrome).

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 25, 2014
Posts: 69140

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: I am wondering if anyone has experience using these programs with
: non-verbal (but not hearing impaired) children? Since most
: programs require oral repetition of sounds, how does one address
: this with a non-verbal (extremely poor oral-motor skills) person?
: I have two non-verbal children and know of many more with the same
: syndrome as my children (Joubert Syndrome).I worked teaching reading to a boy, age 8, who had a kind of LD plus physical symptoms that made his speech very dis-ordered. When you first heard him, it seemed a meaningless gabble, and then if you tried to pick out a sentence there weren't any. But if you just sat back and went with the flow, a quite reasonable amount of meaning emerged from the mess.Working with him, I taught him the phonics sounds and had him read aloud working very very gradually through the first hundred words of reading. As we worked on reading, reading aloud, segementing, blending, intonation (pauses for commas and periods, etc.), and all the rest, his speech also improved.We also worked on his priniting, first holding his hand to guide him, and his fine motor skills showed some improvement too, as did his ability to follow directions.Could something like this also be effected in your case? That is, could teaching in phonics be allied to some basic speech therapy type of work? It is a very good thing in teaching phonics to show kids the proper formation of sounds -- I have done this for years anyway, working from a linguistics standpoint, and I understand that Phonographix (just for one example) makes a point of it. Depending on where your kids are, as you teach the letter and its code sound or sounds, you could also help the child shape his mouth and tongue to the proper form and make as good an approximation to the sound as possible. You make the sound several times as a model in a good phonics program, as well.In fact, when kids put a fair amount of effort into something and spend time on it, they remember it better anyway; this might actually be a hidden advantage in your child's remembering sound-spelling patterns -- you take two or three (or more) times as long to cover them the first time, but then the knowledge is retained forever.I don't know at all about your situation, but this is something to try that, *if not forced to frustration level*, will do no harm -- and it may do some good.

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