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CCC Reading Program


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted Sep 04, 2002 at 11:00:10 PM
Subject: CCC Reading Program

Computer Curriculum Corp. CCC - Reading
I have no idea to what this program is about. My son's new school has this reading program for Reading Lab. He is in 5th grade and can only read 2nd grade level. Will this program work for him?

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 21, 2014
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Posted:Sep 04, 2002 11:29:33 PM

I am sorry that I have not heard of this program. However, I will tell you that your child needs a teacher to teach him how to read. I agree with others that you may want further testing on your son to determine if the IQ scores are depressed due to a processing disorder or something, but regardless, he will likely need to be taught with a structured, multisensory phonics program. I think someone may have already mentioned this, but "Reading Reflex" is a great book and contains the Phono-Graphix method of teaching reading. Perhaps you could teach him yourself or else locate a tutor who uses this method (or an Orton Gillingham based program). Since he is reading at 2nd grade level in fifth grade, I would not be counting on the school to teach him. They've shown that they don't know how already.

Janis

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 21, 2014
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Posted:Sep 04, 2002 11:42:46 PM

Thanks for your reply.
My son was evaluated in April 2000. Is considered a Slow Learner/Borderline student. His IQ 74, with a visual perception problem.
He has gone to visual therapy sessions last year. He has no IEP plan as he does not qualify for services. The accomodations they gave him was CCC Reading. ???
I am going for an independent evaluation hoping to find out what is causing this problem other than the visual.
Thanks again.

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 21, 2014
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Posted:Sep 04, 2002 11:45:47 PM

Do you still have the IQ test scores? It would be helpful to see the breakdown of subtest scores plus the verbal and performance scores.

Janis

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 05, 2002 12:08:31 AM

Yes, I still do. He took the evaluation when he was 9.4 years old, 3rd grade.

WISC-11
Standard Scores Verbal IQ 83, Performance IQ 69, Full Scale IQ 74.
Index Scores Verbal Comp. 84, Perceptual Organiz. 69, Freedom From Distractibility 78, Processing Speed 80

Verbal Functioning Scaled Scores
Infomation 6
Similarities 6
Arithmetic 7
Vocabulary 7
Comprehension 9

Performance Function
Picture Completion 10
Coding 6
Picture Arrangement 2
Block Design 5
Ofject Assembly 1

Optional Subtests
Digit Span 5

Woodcock-johnson-Revised:
Grade Equ.
Letter-Word Identification 1.5
Passage Comprehension 1.4
Calculation 2.5
Applied Problems 3.6
Diction 1.7
Writing Samples 2.0
Broad Reading Cluster 1.5
Broad Math Cluster 2.9
Broad Written Lang. 1.8

Well here it is...............let me know what you think? Thanks again

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 05, 2002 8:21:43 AM

Thlis testing is 2 years old? It would pay to have it redone privately; also, don't use grade equivalents, especially since your child at 9.4yrs old was old for 3rd grade(?retained), so ask the private psych. what norms will be used to determine academic scores.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 05, 2002 5:57:14 PM

I agree that another evaluation would be wise. You have a 14 point gap between verbal and performance on the WISC. That's pretty significant. Also, you have subtest scatter on the performance side ( scores of 10 to 1). He also was functioning close to grade level in math at the time. I definitely do not think I would rely on a score of 74 as being indicative of his overall functioning. Hopefully you will get a very good evaluation this time! Let us know how it turns out!

Janis

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 05, 2002 10:18:43 PM

SAR and Janis, thanks so very much for your input.
Testing will start Sept 11th, the testing will be broken down into once a week for four weeks. I will let you know the outcome.
mjm

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 06, 2002 5:58:32 AM

It really doesn't matter what the IQ is or why he can't read, buy Reading Reflex and teach him how to read. Every child needs to know how to segment, blend, and move sounds in and out of words in order to read well. The only reason for knowing the IQ is that some reading programs work better if the child has a high IQ. Don't wait for testing. If you need help, email me personally but wait a few days, I am having problems with my email. Will let you know when it is up and running again, we had a computer crash.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 06, 2002 11:36:08 AM

It was sitting on the computers at a lab in a school where I worked. The fact that it wasn't being used doesn't mean it wasn't good (lots and lots of administrative turnover... something about nervous breakdowns...) -- but I would agree w/ Shay and start working with it on your own -- it should support anything he's doing on a computer.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 06, 2002 12:01:39 PM

Shay & Sue,
I definetly will look into the program. We have worked with Hooked on Phonics and he can read all the books included in the program. But when it comes to his grade level books he gets stuck..
He has had whole lang. in school so when he reads and gets stuck on a word instead of sounding it out, he says to me wait a minute I know this word, but can't remember. I truly believe in a phonic base program, it was how I learned to read and my mother learned to read. Unfortunetly, to many new programs have hit the school system and has totally confused the students, parents and teachers.
Thanks for your input, it's really appreciated. mj

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 06, 2002 9:56:58 PM

Hi ~ our school has CCC in the computer lab as well as a few stand alone versions. Essentially, it's a workbook on the computer. I've used the math concepts and skills, spelling, reading workshop, and initial reading. The spelling is worthless, in my opinion ~ it's a computerized voice giving the words, and I had a hard time knowing what word the voice was saying at times, never mind my kids!! It doesn't "teach" spelling: it simply dictates words and mixes in a few games, most of which were hard to me! The reading workshop is basically a computerized version of any reading comprehension workbook; you could buy one at a local teacher store or even at Walmart/BJ's/Sam's that would essentially be similar. The math program is probably the best: that's the one that my students use.
The good things about CCC are: 1) using it takes only a few minutes: the spelling program is 10 min a session, the reading and math are about 15 min. a session;
2) it has built in what's called "inital placement level": the teacher starts the child at the grade level they're currently in, and over approximately 10 sessions the program places them at their appropriate instructional level.
3) it continually reviews material that the child has struggled with, and keeps excellent records on all sorts of things: how many sessions your child has been on, if they've asked for help, if they logged off before they finished, as well as percentages and grade leves for each strand of each program (reading workshop has 4-5 strands, I think, and the math has close to 15 or so). The teacher can print out numerous types of reports based on a single child or a whole class, and the data you can get, if done correctly, is impressive. However, don't expect as a parent to be able to walk into the lab and do it yourself: it's usually only the teacher or the lab instructor, and then they have to be trained. The reports will tell you exactly the skill your child is struggling with, and how many times the computer has had to re-cycle your child through that concept.
4) each program, but especially the math, can be individualized for each student. For example, the math program has numerous strands for every possible area: all four main operations, fractions, geometry, measurement, word problems, science applications, probability, place value, and so on. For each one of those, the teacher has the option of turning that strand "off", or leaving it on and placing it at a certain grade level. So say your child struggles with multiplication and division, but is at ease with addition and subtraction. The instructor can set the two harder strands at one level, and the easier strands at a more difficult level.
5) Each program has a span of several grade levels: the math goes K-8, spelling 2-8, reading workshop 3-8. A child who is above average can work at it as easily as one who is having difficulties..

All that said (sorry it was so long, but I wanted you to understand the program), most of the teachers at our school don't like it. Our principal brought it with him when he came a few years ago, and has continued to upgrade it even though we have continually expressed that we'd rather not use it. I feel it's good for students who need extra review and practice( though as I said I'd forget the spelling program), and who don't get bored doing "drill" type activities. The biggest complaint students have is that it's boring, especially the kids in 5th and 6th grades. The record keeping and data collection is one of it's biggest advantages, as it can analyze a whole class, grade, or even school and print out graphs, reports, etc., that look good for a school board (we've never done that, however). Like I said, I think the math is beneficial, although I would NEVER suggest that it is enough to take the place of a teacher, which our principal has hinted at. It's only 15 minutes long, and is enough to provide extra practice in the areas a child is weak in, or give extra exposure to advanced concepts for a child who is above grade level. It does not take the place of an IEP or special ed support, and I would NEVER suggest writing it into the IEP under goals and objectives. My kids in my resource room use the math program when they've finished their lessons and still have time left.

Again, I'm sorry this is so long, but I hope what I've told you helps. CCC isn't a bad program, but if your child does have a learning disability (I skimmed the other posts, so I'm not sure) he/she will need much more than just that. Don't let the school try to tell you that CCC alone can meet your child's needs, if they try, which I would doubt. Good luck!

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 07, 2002 9:50:22 AM

Jenn,
Thank you for your input. My son has reading lab 2 x a day with CCC. Once in class and the other at the end of the day durning the after school program. I have to make a decision whether to keep my son in this reading lab, which would be at the end of everyday or have him tutored by a lindamood reading spec. 2 x a week. He is reading at 2nd grade level and has no idea how to sound out words other than a, e, i , o ,u vowels.....
He is considered a slow learner/borderline case with no iep in place except a few accommodations such as the reading lab etc. He has an audio and visual perception problem. We have worked on the visual with therapy, but never with audio.
He needs a foundation in phonics which he was never taught. Reading and of couse Spelling are his down fall.
He is going for an independent eval on the 11th as the one from the school is two years old. I need to find out what are the underlining problems are for what the school considers slow learner/borderline.
Thanks again,
mj

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 07, 2002 1:19:44 PM

Go for Lindamood!!
A real teacher and a real phonics program will be 100 times better than a computerized workbook-on-a-screen.
As Shay and others have pointed out, get a real teacher and actually teach the kid to read, first and always.

That said, IF (and that is a HUGE if!) the IQ of 74 is accurate, Grade 2-3 reading level at age 10-11 is not entirely inappropriate. IF this is accurate (and please do look into other things, including real, detailed testing of hearing and vision, not just ten-minute screens) then he will learn more slowly and take more time. Doesn't mean he can't learn, but trying to rush him to some artificially defined "grade level" will just lead to frustration and failure. By Grade 9 in high school at age 15 he should be able to attain *at least* Grade 5-6 reading level, maybe more if he gets real teaching now, and many kids make their way through high school with that.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Sep 07, 2002 8:13:50 PM

I agree, go for Lindamood. CCC doesn't teach phonics at all, and don't believe anyone who tries to tell you that the Initial Reading program covers it ~ it doesn't, not the way your son needs. Using CCC once in class won't hurt him, like I said before, each program is 10-20 min. long (as long as they only have him doing one program, and not spending an hour on it doing two or three!), so it won't be wasting too much valuable teaching time. Good luck!

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