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Can't read cursive writing


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted May 28, 2003 at 11:29:44 AM
Subject: Can't read cursive writing

Does anyone have a suggestion for a 7th grader who has never been taught to read cursive writing (printing was hard enough) but now we are really struggling because he receives instruction in cursive and teachers write on the board in cursive.

Sure you might think just ask them to print but we would like him to learn how to read cursive. It has been a safety issue that he can't read certain messages.

I would love to hear from you!

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 28, 2003 11:55:44 AM

I think the only way to learn to read cursive is to learn to write cursive. You might want to try handwriting without tears.

I also think that visual perception can play a role. I am speaking from my own experience with my son so it might be different for you. How is he at things like reading charts, maps etc..?


If this is an area of difficulty consider doing the exercises for visual perception in Jerome Rosner's book, "Helping Children Overcome Learning Difficulties."

They really helped my son with this particular issue.

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 28, 2003 12:06:15 PM

I reckon I'd start by showing him how similar the letters are (basically you add loops and connections to *most* letters), and practice reading some words with the easier letters; words like bat, ball, cat, call, etc.
Maybe even make some tiles so he can build words and practice a little "cursive spelling-- putting the letters on tiles (or good-sized chunk of cardstock) means he doesn't have to write.
Try learning a, b, c, d, i, l, m and just practicing words with them for a week or until it's easy. Then toss in h, k (so you can do -ck words), n, o, p, r, and u (throwing in that nasty "r" in the middle of some easier ones), then e, f , g.... then j, q, s, t, and vinylly w x y and z.
I"m just tossing out ideas here guided by the principle that you break tasks down and start with the easy stuff, and try to cut out hard stuff that you don't *have* to do to learn it. Then when you're teaching it, you don't move on while you're totally confused, and if it doesn't work, break it down smaller or try something different

[%sig%]

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 28, 2003 1:49:19 PM

My son has/had the same problem. He is in 6th grade. We have done a number of things.

First reading and to some extent writing cursive were IEP goals. So he had OT once a week this year. As far as reading cursive went, the OT did various exercises like writing the letters in cursive and he had to write the print equivalent underneath. She wrote out popular songs and other high interest material in cursive with space underneath for him to "translate."

I also like Handwriting Without Tears and I just heard of something new: www.peterson-handwriting.com. It some kind of computer program which teaches people how to use fluid movements to form cursive letters. It looked pretty interesting.

Lastly, I also agree that difficulty reading cursive can also be a visual issue. If your son has poor handwriting and/or reading difficulties, he might need an evaluation by a developmental optometrist.

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 29, 2003 7:11:53 AM

Well, this is interesting, b/c I have the same situation with my daughter. She CAN write in cursive - though prefers printng.

She DOES (as Linda F said) have VPD and has been treated (2.3 years of private SI OT and 1x/wkly school OT), but cursive remains a huge problem. She has trouble with ANY board copying, so cursive on the blackboard is going to be worthless. She has "limited board copying" on her IEP. We may have to change that to NO board copying in MS. Teachers CAN provide hand out notes, but I understand from others moms this is a real struggle.

I am "one of those moms" that never goes away and so far we have been pretty successful with my school district in getting what my daughter needs accommodation-wise - though there have been a few "bumps in the road".

I would suggest the teacher hand-outs.

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 29, 2003 10:35:51 PM

You have good advice above about teaching cursive. The cards to put together can be especially useful. You can also make cards with a textured paint and feel the letter shapes while tracing them.
I'll gladly email my info about handwriting on request (backlogged right now but will be sending shortly.)

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 30, 2003 11:29:29 AM

Another option you may consider is to have things typed out on the computer that your child is able to read and then change the font to a cursive font (D'Nealian cursive is a good choice if you can get it). Even try the printed word above and then copy (ctl + C) and then paste it (ctl + V) right underneath so that they visually compare both models.

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 22, 2017
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Posted:May 30, 2003 2:16:40 PM

Handwriting without tears was a good program for us but the thing that made it click was a good eval by a developmental optometrist. Has your child had one?

The tracking exercises helped us most. If you have not had a vision evaluation done by a developmental or behavioral optometrist, do consider one.

Go back to square one on the curvise handwriting, reteach and pay attention to the grip. We use the rubber pencil grips and molded pens and mechanical pencils to correct a grip that was never right and impeded writing progress.

Good luck

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