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Changing from IEP to a 504


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Joined: Feb 11, 2012
Posts: 5
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Posted Feb 11, 2012 at 8:58:21 AM
Subject: Changing from IEP to a 504


Can the school district change an IEP to a 504?

We moved to a new school district. My dyslexic middle school daughter is doing well and meeting most goals--except for reading. She advocates for herself and wants less modifications and accomodations. Indeed, her requests were granted. She struggles but her grades are great. She compensates a lot but still struggles with reading. She has not met grade level goal in reading but is progressing in some of the other areas. She participates in sports and clubs. She has more confidence since we moved to a new school district that better implements best practices. She is in the 8th grade. The former school district pushed her along. She had wonderful teachers but best practices were not used and --we had to make a complaint to the state for the former school district to use SBRI, etc. It was too late as she was 4 grade levels behind her peers in reading. Today, in a new school district, she is being challenged and thriving and wants to go to college. The work is hard but she is doing well--she is catching up and can fool a lot of teachers as the she is the "master compensator." She learned to compensate early as she struggled so much and had high comprehension. Teachers were perplexed at her former school as she was so intelligent but could not read. The art teacher, at her new school, mentioned that she should go to a 504 because of her confidence. The teacher felt that the IEP is too stigmatizing and will not be viewed very well my some colleges. The art teacher told this to my daughter who became upset but we are working through that. She has severe dyslexia--despite all of her confidence. She has an IEE stating the diagnoses of dyselxia as well as executive functioning, etc. Her dyslexia is complicated and impedes her learning in some strange ways. We secured IEP at the expense of her former school district as that district failed her. I stated to the art teacher that if she is meeting most of her goals that new goals should be formed to challenge her and get her to grade level. And, she is still not at grade level for reading and that goal should be addressed and reviewed before changing the IEP to a 504. I am confused as I see her confidence, her growth and her challenges. Even though the art teacher (who is not part of the PPT team) stated this, I am concerned that some of the staff may want to see her IEP changed to a 504 based on my daughter's confidence and her compensatory skills. They also like my daughter as she is a great student and participates in a lot of school activities to support teacher, other students, etc. Personally, I want that IEP to follow her through high school as I know the complexities of the dyslexia and how it shows itself in different ways as she progresses. Should the IEP be changed to a 504? Will the IEP limit her college admissions? We fought so hard to get her to this point and it seems that the IEP is seen as the plague by some teachers, at least one art teacher.

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:Feb 12, 2012 10:04:05 AM

Orithia,

I read your posting and feel compelled to offer you some thoughts on the advice you have been given by your child's Art teacher. Bluntly, I think the advice comes up quite short to provide you with any constructive strategy to further enhance your daughter's success in school. Tell the Art teacher to teach art and keep his opinions to himself.

Please note the following:

1) It is patently clear to me that your daughter remains a child with a disability and is in need of special education. Therefore, her need continues for her to have an IEP to assist her with her Learning disability in reading. Stigmas associated with having an IEP, if it exists, is far less important than your child receiving the services she needs. It is important to focus on what is needed and appropriate rather than perceive a stigma.

2) Colleges and universities are quite sensitive to prospective students who hav special needs. This was not the case about 10 years ago but they have come light years to provide the necessary help and support for students who have documented histories of special education isues.

3) An IEP is not a recognizable document at the higher education level. IDEA is applicable only for disabled youth in Prek-12 in the public and private schools. It does not transcend into higher education. The entitlement stops when a child either graduates from high school, is declassified as disabled, or a parent refuses the services. Higher education institutions are required to consider the needs of students under the Section 504 provision of the Rehabilitation Act and the American With Disabilities Act. I will explain more about this later.

4) For now, stay the course and stay with the IEP.

DRHD

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DRHD
Joined Apr 29, 2008
Posts: 135

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Posted:Feb 12, 2012 6:28:38 PM

Orithia,

I failed to ask you what grade level is your child?

DRHD

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