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Is this enough to say "He is a reader" no further testing


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Joined: Jan 23, 2013
Posts: 1
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Posted Jan 23, 2013 at 5:06:12 PM
Subject: Is this enough to say "He is a reader" no further testing

Hi,

My son reads at a .9 Star Reader level and is in second grade. He reads on average 35 words per minute and answers between 2 and 4 comprehension questions right in the time alotted where his target is 12.

He had a Jordan Left-Right Reversal Test that said he is in the 3% of boys his age on this test.

The school phsycologist did a screener using:
Woodcock-Johnson III Normative Update Tests of Cognitive Abilities and the WCJIII Test of Achievement.

His scores..standard score / percentile rank
GIA 95/38
Verbal Ability 95/38
Comprehension-Knowledge (GC) 95/38
Thinking Ability 105/64
Long-Term Retrieval Glr 90/26
Visual-Spatial Thinking Gv 127/96
Auditory Processing Ga 105/63
Fluid Reasoning Gf 96/39
Cognitive Efficiency 90/26
Processing Speed (Gs) 89/23
Short-Term Memory (Gsm) 93/32

Reading
Letter-Word Identif 95/38
Reading Fluency 81/10
Passage Comp 85/16
Math
Calculation 96/39
Math Fluency 88/22

This is all that was tested. We were told he scores too high to warrent further testing. I am Dyslexic and have worked with him since he was a baby and yet he still can not read new words or big words and still does not know site words he had done 1000 times.

I wanted him tested for word attack, spelling of sounds, sound awareness, and sound blending.

I asked for phonological testing. the Psychologist says would not matter his results show he is a reader. He reads know words that he has memorized. At least that is what i see.

Do these results above tell us enough to say he is not Dyslexic?

Thank you!!!

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eoffg
Joined Sep 28, 2011
Posts: 93

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Posted:Jan 24, 2013 5:20:16 AM

Hi Nikki and welcome here,

The test scores and your own observations are enough to confirm that he is having a difficulty.
Where given that he is in second grade, it is important to have further testing to get a clearer understanding of his difficulty. So that you can then directly work on this.
Rather than wait a couple of years until he is really failing, and the school psych is then forced to recognise he has a difficulty.
But it does tell you a lot about the school psych, where it is also a test of how helpful this school psych is?

Though you could make a formal request for an IEE independent educational evaluation, which you are legally entitled to, and they have to pay for.
Where instead of 'asking' for phonological testing, you can 'tell' them what testing they will do.

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gracefuldove77
Joined Apr 10, 2013
Posts: 2

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Nikki
Different states have different qualifications for certain programs. In the state of FL students with Dyslexia fall under the "Specific Learning Disabilities" (SLD) label. We use the tests that you described in your post as our psychological assessments. It appears he a general ability index of a 95 which they used as the IQ score. 95 is in the average range. The only areas that he scored lower in on the assessments were reading fluency (81), reading comprehension (85), and processing speed (89); these scores are still in the low average areas. Under the "old" rules for SLD his scores are not low enough to qualify, but given his STAR test and performance if he was in the RtI process and interventions weren't successful the IEP team could still discuss qualification for an ESE program under the SLD label. He also would qualify for a 504 due to lower processing speed and could receive accommodations in the classroom and for testing. I hope that this helps. Has an IEP team conviened and discussed the scores you shared? As a parent you have procedural safeguards and if you disagree with the team about your son's ineligibility for a program you have the right to mediation. I would adivise contacting your Special Education Manager for your area or the guidance counselor or special education teacher to discuss options.

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