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Parenting a Child with LD or ADHD

Non-verbal IQ tests


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted Nov 26, 2001 at 2:20:28 PM
Subject: Non-verbal IQ tests

My niece has an assortment of various issues...she's 6 1/2. They performed an IQ test and came up with 50. Neither my sister or I feel it's even close to her intelligence, but her issues and speech problems and auditory problems make it difficult to administer a regular test. The LD consultant recommended a non-verbal IQ test. So my sister requested it and is supposed to sign the consent forms tomorrow. Of course the pysch at the district isn't sure about this although he'll have the forms for her to sign. What kinds of name(s) should she be looking for to identify the proper test? Like TONI or something like that?

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
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Posted:Nov 26, 2001 3:30:36 PM

Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-2 (TONI-2) (ages 5-85.11)

Designed for those who require language-free, motor-reduced, or culture-reduced test of abstract/figural problem solving. This tests "a small sliver" of intelligence. Administered individually in pantomime; the participant points to answers. This test is untimed; takes about 15 minutes to administer. Good reliability and validity, although may studies are from the TONI and extrapolated to the TONI-2.

Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised * (ages 2-20.11)

This new revision of the Leiter is a nonverbal measure of intelligence requiring no speaking or writing from examiner or examinee. It claims to be "culture free". It is untimed. There are 20 subtests in these broad area: Reasoning, Visualization (spatial), Memory, Attention. Scores derived include a Full Scale IQ score; a brief IQ scree; a brief ADHD screen; and a brief gifted screen. Overall good reliability with some variation among subtests; Good validity.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 9:35:52 AM

While it is not language free, I cannot help but wonder whether she was given the Weschler. These tests, the WISC being the most often used, offer a verbal and nonverbal section. I have taught several students who have severe language disabilities. I have one right now who tests 55 verbal IQ and about 100 performance (nonverbal) on the WISC. I have another who tests 50 verbal, 80 performance, etc. I see this kind of spread quite frequently, so I tend to feel the WISC (or WPPSI, for younger children) is a valid measure and can point to a legitimate discrepancy.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 2:03:12 PM

Anitya,

When you see a discrepancy such as the one you said in the other post, would that be a cause of concern that the child is not learning disabled, but mentally retarded? My son has a verbal 66 performance 85 on the WISC, but on the KBIT (which is supposed to be a nonverbal IQ test) he got 91 verbal 107 performance. The school tells me he is mentally retarded, the neuropsychologist tells me he has several concommitant (did i spell that right?) learning disabilities. I tend to believe the Neuro, however the school is insisting he is mentally retarded and working at cognitive level.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 2:58:50 PM

The reason the verbal is so low is probably due to the combination of CAPD/ADD. When my daughter was in 2nd grade her verbal was 70, which is only 4 points higher than your son's. After using the FM trainer for 8 years her verbal is around 100. Remember an IQ test only measures what you don't know or haven't been exposed to and how you did on one particular day. So the best thing I could suggest is keep reading with him, talking with him, use reflective listening to make sure that he understands what you are talking about and hopefully he qualifies for services with a speech and language pathologist.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 3:35:06 PM

Patty, in a case like this I would like additional information. I don't know what that test is your neuropsych used. I don't understand how we can test verbal IQ w/no verbal input. Interesting. Usually we can look at some multiple measures to glean where ability is. Pattim is right in a for some situtations, however I have seen enough instances where IQ remains in the same range over time, rather than reflecting a particular "day." Adaptive scales are another way to assess functioning. There are tests that test "high" like the Kaufman. I have never taught a child ID'd with the Kaufman who had the intelligence, in my opinion as a teacher, the psych. "diagnosed" from the Kaufman. In my opinion it tests 15 points high every time. I have taught several students from other districts who were assessed with this "misleading" instrument.

Did the neuropsych use an adaptive measure?

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 3:39:04 PM

The K-BIT is the Kaufman BRIEF intelligence test. It has 2 subtests and takes 15-20 minutes, total, to administer. I think I would put my money on the longer, more indepth test that taps into more areas. The K-BIT is not what I would consider a thorough test, it is too limited in how it defines intelligence and won't give enough diagnostic information. I'll take a WISC any day.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 4:24:38 PM

The neuro psychologist used the WISC, along with several other tests. She stated that the reason his scores were so low was because he has a language disability along with probably CAPD (diagnose confirmed with an audiologist later), ADD and a reading disability. Even when I point blank asked her if he was mentally retarded, she stated no, that he has a communication disorder. The school just looked at the overall IQ results and said he was mentally retarded. Yes the KBIT is a brief test, one done as a sidethought from the psychologist who is helping my son with his ADD. And as an addition to the information above, my son was given the testing while he was on Adderal, which made him anxious, and caused many perseveration problems. He is now on Concerta and the side effects have diminished quite a bit. After exploring a bit on the web about communication disorders, the WISC isn't such a great IQ evaluator. However the school refuses to do any other testing.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 27, 2001 6:33:45 PM

I have a son who is ADHD, inattentive type, CAPD, and mixed receptive/expressive language disoder who also took the WISC. His scores were ok despite these but I wonder how accurate it is with his dx's. He scored a 92 on the verbal and 100 on the performance for an overall IQ of 95. This score did not change from his first IQ test which was the slosson in 1st grade. The WISC I mentioned was a 4th grade score. His reading teacher feels that his score does not reflect his true ability. She has recommended a neuropyschological evaluation to get a better picture of his true abilities. The problem is the WISC is a standard so will likely be used so I dont see what the point is. What do you all think? He is currently in the 8th grade.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 28, 2001 12:17:00 AM

The beauty of the WISC is in the subtests. You can find, a child who seems brighter than their IQ actually has some subtest scatter, with 1-2 that are above average, hence the bright child people see. By the same token the above average scores can be areas of intelligence that are not as readily observed and for all intents and purposes in the classroom, the child appears less bright than the IQ score.

Also, lets us recall that school is primarily verbal.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 28, 2001 3:57:07 AM

You could ask for the Woodcock Johnson III Cognitive Battery- the structure of the test is quite different and will give a different sort of look at his strengths and weaknesses. A neuropsyche may well give the WISC- but they usually have a lot of other tools in their arsenal as well.
Robin

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Anonymous
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Posted:Nov 28, 2001 7:38:22 PM

Yes both my boys have taken the test and had sub scores that ranged from 5-13. This pattern of testing is consitant for both boys, they always show a wide test scatter. They both have higher comprehension scores then coding skills. Their stanine scores on the MAT 7 last year were also very wide the oldest was anywhere from the 3rd stanine to the 7th, the youngst was from the 2nd to 5th. Both boys weak areas are the verbal scales. Both boys are well below reading level--but they both have TONS of backround knowledge. INteresting how this works out.

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