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Parenting a Child with LD or ADHD

Therapies that help NLD?

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 28, 2014
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Posted:Feb 17, 2002 8:52:53 PM

Karen,

You are very right, it is tough! My current plan is to work it into her speech/language therapy time which does not interfere with academic teachibg time. I agree that pulling them out too much can be more harmful than helpful sometimes!

Janis

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Anonymous
Joined Nov 28, 2014
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Posted:Feb 18, 2002 1:51:55 PM

Karen:

How about bribery? We have done a combination of bribery and coersion to get our LD son to work in the summer. Our cause has been helped by the fact that several neighborhood children have had to go to summer school and he too has been elgible. He prefers to spend two hours with me to four hours in school!!!
(Now they have changed the rules so he isn't elgible any more for summer school but we aren't telling him!!! I have big plans.)

Having the summer though has really made a tremendous difference in what we've been able to get done.

BTW, I really liked your idea of plastic wrap versus alum. wrap. I am amazed by what LD kids don't pick up. My son, after struggling with the idea of a founder (of a city or country) finally got it. But it wasn't until I got that he thought a founder "found" the city---and that how could he do that when it wasn't already there!!!

Beth

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Anonymous
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Posted:Feb 18, 2002 5:47:15 PM

We did use bribery to get him to go to OT last summer. It cost me a Game Boy Advanced!<g>

The trouble is that I could bribe him to go, I could insist that he be polite and compliant, but I couldn't MAKE him be invested in the work he was doing. In that instance, it probably didn't matter much, because we were only trying to get to the point that they would agree to an assistive tech assessment. I don't really think that if he HAD been invested in the work he was capable of making the progress he would have needed to NOT need assistive tech.

The other problem is that _I_ couldn't do a program with him. We would just butt heads too much. So I'd have to try to find someone he would work with willingly. All in all, a daunting task.

Karen

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Anonymous
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Posted:Feb 19, 2002 8:35:15 AM

Karen,

Every kid is different. I know my son wouldn't be where he is at without the help he has received in the summer. My son wasn't initially invested in anything we've done but over time became more so. But for your son it seems perhaps keeping the work load manageable is more important than anything. And perhaps he needs a break more than anything else. My son could use one too but it is hard to lay off when you are finally seeing some pay off for all the work we've done.

Beth

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Anonymous
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Posted:Feb 19, 2002 11:35:41 AM

I think that's one of the most frustrating things for the parent of an NLD child, and one of the hardest things for teachers to accept. That NLD children just can't be pressured. They fall apart if you do. That doesn't mean that you can't keep chipping away at their deficits, but if you want them to arrive in adulthood emotionally intact, you really need to let their stress level be the focus of the kind and amount of remediation that you attempt.

NLD kids are so verbal, with huge vocabularies, and the read so well. Many are highly intelligent. They can seem SO competent until they fall apart on you :-/

Karen

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Anonymous
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Posted:Feb 19, 2002 2:23:49 PM

Karen,

Perhaps this is where nonverbal and language based disabilities are different. For language based disabilities intensity of work is very important. This intensity can cause stress--believe me--but seems critical to get change. Fast Forward, for example, requires five 20 minute sessions a day. We did it. It is stressful. The challenge becomes how to keep the stress within reason. I push my son a lot---sometimes he falls apart but it doesn't affect his emotional well being the way stress seems to influence a child with nonverbal learning disabilities. In fact, I had a friend with an older (19 years old) LD child comment on how much self esteem my son has. He was stressed by not being able to measure up to other kids and increasing his competency has reduced his stress at school. This year is the first year he doesn't complain every day.

I can see how dealing in the world of school where language based disabilities are far more common (and still not very well understood) must be a constant challenge
and try a mother's patience.

Beth

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