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Help Needed!-Writing IEP Goals for 2nd Grader


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69138
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Posted Apr 19, 2002 at 8:39:16 PM
Subject: Help Needed!-Writing IEP Goals for 2nd Grader

Hello! I need help writing measurable, and appropriate short-term (quarterly) and long-term (12 months) goals for my dyslexic 2nd grade son. We had full psychological testing conducted outside of the school. The results indicate he will benefit most from an Orton-Gillingham method of teaching. Of course, parents cannot suggest a method; however, goals can be written in a way that only an Orton-Gillingham method could help him meet the goals. He is currently receiving tutoring outside of the school in a multi-sensory
Can anyone e-mail or fax me fax # (847) 918-1386, examples of measurable goals that have strong Orton-Gillingham multi-sensory method slants relative to my son's dyslexia goals. He has the following issues:
- decodes very slowly
- b/d reversals, p/q reversals
- insecure with short vowels
- does not understand signals that indicate short or long vowels
- phonological errors
- no knowledge of vowel-r cominations and vowel combinations
- unsure of ch-, unsure of vowel +ng/nk and -all words
- unsure of spelling rules
Our IEP meeting with the school is at the end of the month.
Thanks in advance for your help!

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 19, 2002 10:09:07 PM

While you're working on writing those goals, you might want to look into LindamoodBell Auditory Discrimmination therapy. You may want to rule out auditory processing disorder as well. My son is both dyslexic with APD and the "Slingerland" method of multisensory remediation made him crazy.

How to say Orton Gillingham without saying Orton Gillingham? You say a "multisensory, integrated, sequential, direct instructional approach".

Also, as important as the goals, is

1) The specific wording of "who" is to provide the remediation. Special ed teacher, regular teacher or SLP.Don't forget to specifically ask what Special Ed backgound the sp. ed teacher has. e.g....a "developmentally disabled" certificate is not as specific to your child's needs as a "learning disabled" one. You'll be glad to have this information.

2) Exactly "where" the remediation is to take place. Must be least restrictive environment (LRE). Do you want a regular ed class with resource room pull-out, or does he need a self-contained class with other kids LIKE HIM? What about a private school for dyslexics. Look at the public school programs before you decide. They tried to put my son in with severely handicapped. If resource room, do you want one-on-one or small group. Size of group must be stated or they can throw him in with 12 others.

3) How much time? Daily? In terms of Speech therapy, I would insist on one-on-one, min. 2x's per week. (The speech teacher may be trained in Lindamood.) Everything must be spelled out specifically. What is the length of the IEP? Make sure you have in written into the IEP that there will be a meeting in May at the end of the school year, otherwise, you're stuck with an IEP that needs re-doing. They'll say you can call an IEP at anytime, but we all know that theory and practice are two different things. Make sure they write that the team will reconvene before the end of the school year.

Don't forget the extremely important Modifications and Accomodations. Like:
- no penalty for spelling errors, reverals or omissions in all subjects.
-Quantity of work reduced.
-No peer grading
-Teacher to check assignment book and backpack daily for required materials to come home
-Extra time for tests and projects
-Tests read to him
-Scribe provided
-Dictation allowed
and more.

Please remember that everything MUST be in writing. Verbal agreements are not binding. You might feel like a stickler on every little thing, but you can just say "I want to make sure that we're clear". Make sure your husband or support person goes with you to the IEP. Do NOT sign agreement to the IEP until you have taken it home and read it over for at least three days. This is the best advice. You can always say you and your husband want to discuss it to make sure you agree.

The IEP is a binding legal document...know that your diligence in regards to your son's educational rights will pay off if you approach this matter as a legal matter. You are your son's advocate. Know that the school's best interests are not necessarily in the best interest of your son, so don't buy what they're saying hook, line and sinker.

Hope this gives you a few clues.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 19, 2002 11:37:40 PM

Thank you very much! Have a great weekend.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 20, 2002 9:51:26 AM

Osinski, in a nut shell, "very well put". Only dilema is you don't leave much room for anyone else to add anything :)

Amber, what she advises here is of extreme importance, do not take this advice lightly. Osinski's words of warning below are worth re-reading and taken very seriously.

Andy

"Please remember that everything MUST be in writing. Verbal agreements are not binding. You might feel like a stickler on every little thing, but you can just say "I want to make sure that we're clear". Make sure your husband or support person goes with you to the IEP. Do NOT sign agreement to the IEP until you have taken it home and read it over for at least three days. This is the best advice. You can always say you and your husband want to discuss it to make sure you agree.

The IEP is a binding legal document...know that your diligence in regards to your son's educational rights will pay off if you approach this matter as a legal matter. You are your son's advocate. Know that the school's best interests are not necessarily in the best interest of your son, so don't buy what they're saying hook, line and sinker."

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 20, 2002 8:47:58 PM
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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 20, 2002 9:35:38 PM

I totally agree as I am going through this process also and I always follow up with a letter of understandign and feel this is very important


Lisa in NJ

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 20, 2002 10:03:58 PM

Loved some of your suggestions, I'll be using them for my son's IEP meeting, only it will be for 7th grade. But I have some questions. Last year at the IEP meeting(I wasn't nearly as educated as I am now) I ask for 1 hour of one on one with the Wilson Reading System. The LD teacher told me NO, he didn't have time. I know now I can't specify a program, but can they say they don't have time? Also, I want some help in classes he takes with the rest of the class, ie. science and social studies. I don't know what to ask for, what I would really like is some type of inclusion, another teacher or aid to help him with assignments. It could be someone to help all the LD kids in that class. Do you know of anything I can ask for, if so what?
And, you mean I don't have to sign the IEP that day? If I say I want a few more days to read over it, then do they have to have another meeting to witness my signature or what? I've always just been shoved the paper and said sign here. I would love to wait a while, I always feel so overwhelmed at those meetings.
Thanks for the advice!

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 20, 2002 11:58:14 PM

I always get angry with myself and my husband for just signing the paper that's shoved in front of me.
Now we are armed with all the appropriate outside testing.
We know what the issues are in multiple areas.
I plan on writing the goals myself (All my advocates in my support system are helping, plus all the IEP goals websites) and I will be providing it to the school at our upcoming meeting.
I am absolutely going to use the I will get back to you in 3 business days this time.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 21, 2002 2:47:56 AM


You absolutely do not have to sign the IEP. They can however implement it without your permission.

One thing I don't think parents realize is there really is no federal regulation that states they MUST have a parents permission for the IEP to be implemented. What they do have to have is permission before changing placement. Signing means you attended the meeting.

It is always a good idea to take the IEP home review it and either reconvene another IEP meeting to discuss thing further,or sign it after you hav had time to decide.

The key is to request written notice. They don't have time? Ask for this in writing. You have the right to written notice,ask that they provide to you the reason they are refusing the program.

Now a trick of the IEP game to never let the IEP be completed,if you are in disagreement with the team. They must make sure the parent understands. If you keep asking for clarifications,or keep not understanding then the IEP is not done.

ex. You request a specific type of instruction,you have documentation showing this type,you provide examples of goals,they say no we won't do it. You say,"I don't understand,explain why you won't do it? We don't have time. Okay wait a minute I am still confused,so your saying you don't disagree that this program isn't needed,you just don't have time? Yes,we don't have time. Hmm,okay now I am confused,IDEA mandates that you provide a Free and Appropriate public Education to my child,but your stating you will not do this,because you don't have time? "no,we don't think he needs it." Hmm,now I am really confused on this, first you didn't disagree that he needs it,you said you don't have time,now you state he doesn't need this,which is it?,yes,it's quite annoying,but it keeps them accountable for what they will and will not do. Aside from the fact that now,they must continue before the IEP is completed,which still gives you time to discuss the IEP goals,before they go ahead and implement the IEP without your agreement. Make sense?


Now if they refuse to hear you,and you do not agree,and will wind up proceeding at another level,make sure when you do sign the IEP,that you state directly on the document that you strongly disagree with the IEP.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 21, 2014
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Posted:Apr 21, 2002 2:05:24 PM

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