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Math curriculum for dyslexic child?


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted Mar 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 AM
Subject: Math curriculum for dyslexic child?

My 7yo son confuses math signs/symbols and has a difficult time thinking abstractly. Does anyone have any suggestions for a math curriculum? What do all of you use out there w/dyslexic children?Thanks!Connie W.

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Hi Connie,We use Math U See..It's a program that uses blocks of different sizes to explain all of the math concepts. It comes with a teacher's book, a student book, the blocks and a videotape which has Steve Demme explaining it all lesson by lesson. It's a great hands on program..ruthannMy 7yo son confuses math signs/symbols and has a difficult time
: thinking abstractly. Does anyone have any suggestions for a math
: curriculum? What do all of you use out there w/dyslexic children?: Thanks!: Connie W.

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
Posts: 69140

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: My 7yo son confuses math signs/symbols and has a difficult time
: thinking abstractly. Does anyone have any suggestions for a math
: curriculum? What do all of you use out there w/dyslexic children? Hi Connie,We did not use a "curriculum" but we use(d) LOTS of manipulatives -- marbles, raisins, milk-tops, egg cartons, unifex cubes to demonstrate math facts. My ds was(/still is) allowed to use objects to help him count/do his math facts. Actually most kids do not start thinking abstractly until 9 or 10 (4th or 5th grade) so it is very appropriate to use counters to help them grasp the concept. And appropriate that your child is having difficulties thinking abstractly.For math worksheets (so that we had something that my son looked at as an official worksheet and thus he should do it when told to) I turned to Math Worksheet Factory (free download off the net, very nice!!!) -- the link is in blue below. This year (3rd grade) I turned to Abeka and Miquon and my son that struggled with adding and subtracting in 1st and 2nd now has the confidence to do Abeka (some hs'ers consider it to be tough and demanding). And I turned to fraction tiles when we started adding and subtrating fractions, and to milk-tops to help him work through multiplication and division.I've heard good things about Math-u-see too -- again I think it works cause the child has something in their hands that they can use to help them understand that 2+3=5.carole

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

I've considered Math U See. I'm going to look at it at our homeschool bookfair this coming Spring. Right now, we are doing math orally w/manipulatives.Thanks so much for all the advice!Connie W.

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Saxon Math. I have found that it is wonderful for my child who has signs of dyslexia and a once-severe auditory processing problem.It is very manipulative, interesting, a goes very step-by-step. It is amazing how it involves a use of Language that my child can really follow and gain from in his other subjects, as well.They don't dwell on the symbols of math so much as the process. There is lots of repetition, yet real thinking involved. I find my son really enjoys his math and it has given him a huge dose of feeling good about his abilities.I don't know if this is correct but you can download a test to see which level to buy him at...I think!... www.saxonmath.comI recommend buying the Manipulatives kit that goes with the Saxon curriculum, too.He is finishing up Saxon Math 1 and is about to 'graduate' into Saxon Math 2. Hooray for him!

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Anonymous
Joined Jul 30, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

:My son has CAPD and I used Saxon as a supplement to his regular school math for grades 1 to 3. It is really excellent for explaining things to kids and seems to anticipate language problems kids can have with math. For example, the word "between" as in "name a number between 20 and 30". My son could not for the life of him answer this not because he didn't know, but because he really didn't understand between. Saxon had a wonderful bit on this--putting a fork between the knife and spoon, having the child do it. After working on this for a few days, he had no problem naming a number between two others. This is just one example--the book is full of things that tell you exactly how to say tricky things in clear, child-friendly language. I'm convinced that if I hadn't done this Saxon work with him he would be failing math--instead he's at the top of his class. I also highly recommend using the manipulative with this.Saxon Math. I have found that it is wonderful for my child who has
: signs of dyslexia and a once-severe auditory processing problem.: It is very manipulative, interesting, a goes very step-by-step. It is
: amazing how it involves a use of Language that my child can really
: follow and gain from in his other subjects, as well.: They don't dwell on the symbols of math so much as the process. There
: is lots of repetition, yet real thinking involved. I find my son
: really enjoys his math and it has given him a huge dose of feeling
: good about his abilities.: I don't know if this is correct but you can download a test to see
: which level to buy him at...I think!... www.saxonmath.com: I recommend buying the Manipulatives kit that goes with the Saxon
: curriculum, too.: He is finishing up Saxon Math 1 and is about to 'graduate' into Saxon
: Math 2. Hooray for him!

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