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Book re: homeschooling curriculum


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted Mar 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 AM
Subject: Book re: homeschooling curriculum

I was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a good book that describes what children need to learn at different grades/stages. What do you think of the "What Your X Grader Needs to Know : Fundamentals of a Good X Grade Education" Core Knowledge Series of books? Thanks in advance for any help you can give.Nadine

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

The Core Knowledge series books are a good source of stories, poems, etc. for the various grade levels, and present a reasonable scope and sequence. I actually prefer First Dictionary of Cultural Literacy by E.D. Hirsch, which presents an overview of the core curriculum material for grades K-6. While grade level is important for subjects that build from one topic to the next (math, grammar), subjects like history, science and literature are much more flexible. I work with my kids together on these topics, so I prefer not to worry about what is 2nd grade vs. 4th grade geography- I just want an overview of what we want to cover in the elementary school years.World Book Encyclopedia has a scope and sequence avaiable online- it is very general, but gives an ideas of what topics are typically covered in public school programs.You can also find curriculum objectives for specific topics- for example, Mathematically Correct has a link to a set of standards for math for each grade level.Jean: I was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a good book that
: describes what children need to learn at different grades/stages.
: What do you think of the "What Your X Grader Needs to Know :
: Fundamentals of a Good X Grade Education" Core Knowledge
: Series of books? Thanks in advance for any help you can give.: Nadine

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

: I was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a good book that
: describes what children need to learn at different grades/stages.
: What do you think of the "What Your X Grader Needs to Know :
: Fundamentals of a Good X Grade Education" Core Knowledge
: Series of books? Thanks in advance for any help you can give.: NadineThe "What your ___ Grader Needs to Know" are a fair general outline. They are very very heavily weighted to the arts and a little naive on the math -- the usual (bad) assumption that filling in the blanks according to the answer key means you "know" something about math. They are also not very strong in science. If I were using them, I might *slightly* reduce the reading load at times or perhaps substitute other reading in places, and I would supplement the math A LOT with more concrete approaches. I would also both read more and experiment more in science. Many people on the Math board speak very positively of Saxon Math for homeschooling -- I don't know the program myself, but what I read looks good; go over to the "Teaching Math" section of this board for links.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM
Subject:Re: Book

: Nadine,I concur with Victoria's commments about the What your _____ needs to know series. When I first thought of HS'ing the What your ____ was the first book I purchased. I was in the mode of thinking that there must be some critical piece of information my child needed to have in 3rd grade that he just HAD TO HAVE. Later I realized that I did not want to do 'school at home' or to be taught the way I had. I wanted him to learn how to learn. A friend recommended reading the "Well Trained Mind" by Susan Wise Bauer, I borrowed it from a library and soon after purchased one. It provides a practical approach to what to teach at what grade and why. We've been following it for 6 months now and hs'ing my LD ds is soooo much fun.carole

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Thank you guys so much for you advice. Sounds like the Core books aren't really what I had in mind.Nadine

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

PASSWORD>aamjT37qc5iCc: The "What your ___ Grader Needs to Know" are a fair general
: outline. They are very very heavily weighted to the arts and a
: little naive on the math -- the usual (bad) assumption that
: filling in the blanks according to the answer key means you
: "know" something about math. They are also not very
: strong in science. If I were using them, I might *slightly* reduce
: the reading load at times or perhaps substitute other reading in
: places, and I would supplement the math A LOT with more concrete
: approaches. I would also both read more and experiment more in
: science. Many people on the Math board speak very positively of
: Saxon Math for homeschooling -- I don't know the program myself,
: but what I read looks good; go over to the "Teaching
: Math" section of this board for links. Saxon is rather prone to the "fill in the blanks with the right answer and you know it" philosophy -- it's worth visiting the Kaleidoscapes board and reading what those homeschoolers have to say about math programs. Miquon and Singapore math were highly thought of as far as their promotion of mathematical thinking without sacrificing learning computation skills, though there were plusses and minuses for each (and for different people, different things mattered more). Math U See has lots of hands on and visual components and so has worked well for lots of LD kids, but some people did express concerns that it tended to rely on one "concrete trick" for learning a skill, so some students didn't really make the mathematical connections, but just memorized the trick. (This is always an issue with teaching with manipulatives -- it's a mistake to assume that because the materials are concrete, the concept is better taught; you can make a motor activity just as rote as a symbol manipulation activity.)A big problem with commercial homeschooling materials that attempt to give a scope and sequence is that if you've got a kid with specific LDs, s/he's not going to "fit" any given profile. And then you've got good ol' page 63 (I think) in the Well Trained Mind where it says "Reading is easy. Reading is easy. Reading is easy." So are headstands and cartwheels. Right. If you can get past that, it's a great resource (though *not* for designing a reading program for a kid with dyslexia, obviously!).

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Hi Sue,I tried accessing the Surfin' Sally's Link Emporium at your Resource Room website but I received the following message: http/1.0 404 Object Not Found.Blessings, momo

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

PASSWORD>aa2k2ZyyXZC/cHello! I've just found this web site. I'm in my 6th year of homeschooling. I have 5 children with 4 of them having dyslexia. Think I'm crazy? Actually the oldest two (one "normal" and one with mild dyslixia returned to school this year in 7th and 8th grade. I needed more time with my severe dyslexic,who is 8 years and my 10 and 6 years olds who are mildly dyslexic (thank goodness) I'm having an impossible time finding homeschoolers who will either admit their child has dyslexia or use OG. Most of them i've found so far do vision therapy. AAAHHH!! It is so refreshing to read your notes! thanks mj

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Wow! and you don't sound the least bit crazy. I am also in my 6th year of homeschooling, but I only have two children, ages 13 and 11. My eldest son is the most severely dyslexic. The younger has shown some symptoms over the years, but it has been easier to excuse his problems as developmental delays. I believed for years that this was the case with my older child also, and that he would eventually catch on to reading and writing. It was not until we got close to the teenage years that I finally had to admit, this was not going to happen. We did Reading Reflex about 3 years ago which gave them both a boost but from memory, the reason we dropped off was the complexity (too many phonographs). I attended an OG conference back in October 2000 and started once again to remediate, reading, writing, spelling deficiencies, this time using the Spalding approach. Spaldings 70 phonograms were given to her by Dr. Orton, but this is only one of many similarities between the two approaches. I went with Spalding because I found that one $17 book (The Writing Road To Reading) gave me a very practical easy to follow method for remediating (and it would be equally good for those just starting out). One question I must ask about is your reference to vision therapy. My oldest son is starting vision therapy in less than 16 hours. This is something I have been researching for some months and have found as much, if not more, discouraging comments than positive comments. In the end I felt compelled to try after the evaluation indicated severe problems and knowing how my own vision problems have handicapped me over the years. I do mean vision problems in addition to eyesight (acuity problems). Both my eyes are amblyopic and I have always had difficulty tracking. My thanks to all who write to this board and for all the wisdom and experience you so willingly share.Linda
: Hello! I've just found this web site. I'm in my 6th year of
: homeschooling. I have 5 children with 4 of them having dyslexia.
: Think I'm crazy? Actually the oldest two (one "normal"
: and one with mild dyslixia returned to school this year in 7th and
: 8th grade. I needed more time with my severe dyslexic,who is 8
: years and my 10 and 6 years olds who are mildly dyslexic (thank
: goodness) I'm having an impossible time finding homeschoolers who
: will either admit their child has dyslexia or use OG. Most of them
: i've found so far do vision therapy. AAAHHH!! It is so refreshing
: to read your notes! thanks mj

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Just wanted to mention that you may need to follow up vision therapy with a cognitive training program such as PACE (http://www.mentalskills.com). My daughter had severe developmental vision delays. We did not see a great deal of improvement in her reading from vision therapy, but it laid the sensory/motor foundation for dramatic reading gains from PACE, which trains the fine visual processing skills. If your son does indeed have developmental vision delays, then he has been missing years of normal eye exercise on the cognitive level -- skills such as visual sequencing, visual short-term memory, speed of processing visual inputs. A program such as PACE packs this skill development into a short period of time.I think that often VT falls short of expectations because the cognitive training piece is omitted.Mary: My oldest son is
: starting vision therapy in less than 16 hours. This is something I
: have been researching for some months and have found as much, if
: not more, discouraging comments than positive comments. In the end
: I felt compelled to try after the evaluation indicated severe
: problems and knowing how my own vision problems have handicapped
: me over the years. I do mean vision problems in addition to
: eyesight (acuity problems). Both my eyes are amblyopic and I have
: always had difficulty tracking. My thanks to all who write to this
: board and for all the wisdom and experience you so willingly
: share.: Linda

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM
Subject:Re: PACE

Thanks MaryI am awaiting the sample video for PACE, having listened to the advice of yourself and many others on this board, I had seen this as a potential need. I have also taken the additional step of booking an appointment with an audiologist for a CAPD evaluation.I have also been reading about Audiblox. The impression I get from this board is that PACE is superior to Audiblox. Would you agree or disagree with this?Thanks again for taking the time to write to this board, you have given us renewed hope that something can be done to help our learning different son make his way in a world of printed words.LindaJust wanted to mention that you may need to follow up vision therapy
: with a cognitive training program such as PACE
: (http://www.mentalskills.com). My daughter had severe
: developmental vision delays. We did not see a great deal of
: improvement in her reading from vision therapy, but it laid the
: sensory/motor foundation for dramatic reading gains from PACE,
: which trains the fine visual processing skills. If your son does
: indeed have developmental vision delays, then he has been missing
: years of normal eye exercise on the cognitive level -- skills such
: as visual sequencing, visual short-term memory, speed of
: processing visual inputs. A program such as PACE packs this skill
: development into a short period of time.: I think that often VT falls short of expectations because the
: cognitive training piece is omitted.: Mary

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Well, PACE is definitely more intensive and comprehensive than Audiblox. However, Audiblox costs about $80 and can be done at home, while PACE costs in excess of $2,000 and requires 3 trips a week to a tutor.For a teen, I would definitely choose PACE because of the faster improvement. The visible improvement by the end of the 5th or 6th week helps a lot to boost self-esteem and motivate continued work on the exercises. Audiblox is much slower, and a teen would likely balk at the repititiousness of it. PACE provides much more variety in the exercises, and they tend to be more fun.If the CAPD eval indicates a deficit in phonological processing, I would probably consider doing FastForWord before PACE.Mary: Thanks Mary: I am awaiting the sample video for PACE, having listened to the
: advice of yourself and many others on this board, I had seen this
: as a potential need. I have also taken the additional step of
: booking an appointment with an audiologist for a CAPD evaluation.: I have also been reading about Audiblox. The impression I get from
: this board is that PACE is superior to Audiblox. Would you agree
: or disagree with this?: Thanks again for taking the time to write to this board, you have
: given us renewed hope that something can be done to help our
: learning different son make his way in a world of printed words.: Linda: Just wanted to mention that you may need to follow up vision therapy

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

PASSWORD>aaRFukf1forHkJust a few questions. My son benefited from Audiblox immensely and I am considering to attend an Audiblox and Studiblox (Studiblox is for high school/adults) course so that I can also help others. However, since you say that PACE is better I would like to know why. Obviously I would like to be trained in the better of the two programs.Why is PACE considered to be more intensive than Audiblox? Any person who uses Audiblox can make it as intensive as he or she wants. I started Audiblox with my son by following a very intensive program. We did 5 one-hour lessons per day over a period of 10 days. His reading improved by 2.3 years in the 2-week period, and his comprehension went up from 60% to 90%. I followed this up by doing five half-hour sessions per week. We have seen tremendous benefits in concentration, reading, spelling, handwriting, math, memory, self-esteem. If PACE is more comprehensive, what more benefits does PACE have?Also, I would like to know what PACE uses as an alternative to repetition. I understand that, according to the latest neurological research, repetition is important in the wiring of the brain. Without repetition key connections or synapses between brain cells cannot be formed. The great golfer can only win tournaments because he had spent hours and hours practicing his putts over and over. I’m sure that not all children enjoy repetition. However, I think it is a small price to pay for the advantage of being good at something. But one can hardly keep up with new discoveries these days. Thus, if PACE does not use repetition to form connections or synapses between the brain cells, how then does it wire the brain?: Well, PACE is definitely more intensive and comprehensive than
: Audiblox. However, Audiblox costs about $80 and can be done at
: home, while PACE costs in excess of $2,000 and requires 3 trips a
: week to a tutor.: For a teen, I would definitely choose PACE because of the faster
: improvement. The visible improvement by the end of the 5th or 6th
: week helps a lot to boost self-esteem and motivate continued work
: on the exercises. Audiblox is much slower, and a teen would likely
: balk at the repititiousness of it. PACE provides much more variety
: in the exercises, and they tend to be more fun.: If the CAPD eval indicates a deficit in phonological processing, I
: would probably consider doing FastForWord before PACE.: Mary

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Zelda, Thank you so much for your commments on Audiblox. We are in the early stages of vision therapy, which is going well, but I am looking at follow up progams as recommended by so many on this board.The cost of PACE is somewhat prohibitive and so it is good to hear from someone who has seen good results from Audiblox.Thanks also for posing the questions on repetition, it will be interesting to hear the responses, if any.Two questions I would ask. Was your son a teenager when you did Audiblox? And, Have you investigated the difference between Audiblox and Studiblox and if so would you judge Studiblox to be a better product for the young teenager?: Just a few questions. My son benefited from Audiblox immensely and I
: am considering to attend an Audiblox and Studiblox (Studiblox is
: for high school/adults) course so that I can also help others.
: However, since you say that PACE is better I would like to know
: why. Obviously I would like to be trained in the better of the two
: programs.: Why is PACE considered to be more intensive than Audiblox? Any person
: who uses Audiblox can make it as intensive as he or she wants. I
: started Audiblox with my son by following a very intensive
: program. We did 5 one-hour lessons per day over a period of 10
: days. His reading improved by 2.3 years in the 2-week period, and
: his comprehension went up from 60% to 90%. I followed this up by
: doing five half-hour sessions per week. We have seen tremendous
: benefits in concentration, reading, spelling, handwriting, math,
: memory, self-esteem. If PACE is more comprehensive, what more
: benefits does PACE have?: Also, I would like to know what PACE uses as an alternative to
: repetition. I understand that, according to the latest
: neurological research, repetition is important in the wiring of
: the brain. Without repetition key connections or synapses between
: brain cells cannot be formed. The great golfer can only win
: tournaments because he had spent hours and hours practicing his
: putts over and over. I’m sure that not all children enjoy
: repetition. However, I think it is a small price to pay for the
: advantage of being good at something. But one can hardly keep up
: with new discoveries these days. Thus, if PACE does not use
: repetition to form connections or synapses between the brain
: cells, how then does it wire the brain?

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
Posts: 69138

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

My dd went through PACE through an outside provider. Dh and I liked the program so much, I went and got the PACE training. I ordered Audiblox after we did PACE because I wanted to compare the two programs. Audiblox is a lot like PACE, but there are some significant differences.Most children do not respond as quickly to Audiblox as your son did. Several mothers on the DyslexiaSupport list have worked with Audiblox (many at my suggestion), but many have had problems with their children balking at doing an hour a day and have cut back to something like 20 minutes a day, or dropped the program.I agree with you about repetition. Skills always require repetition. One of the differences between PACE and Audiblox is that PACE offers a wider variety of exercises and they are offered in more of a game-like format -- so that the repetition is less obvious and tiresome.One obvious difference between the programs is that PACE uses a metronome with many of its exercises. There is considerable research indicating that rhythm is fundamental to the ability to learn, and that rhythm and timing play important roles in the development of academic abilities. On the sensory/motor level, timing and rhythm start with the head and eye movements of infants. You can find more information about this at http://www.neuroacoustics.com and http://www.interactivemetronome.com. Those two therapies work on rhythm and timing on the sensory/motor level; PACE incorporates rhythm and timing into cognitive skills training.Another advantage of the metronome is that it helps develop processing speed in an incremental and measurable form. An exercise is first done until accuracy is achieved, then the metronome is introduced at a slow speed so that the exercise is done with accuracy and rhythm. After that the metronome can be set faster in small increments to develop speed.A third use of the metronome is to introduce complexity into the exercises. Many higher order thinking skills require the ability to process multiple tasks simultaneously (simultaneous processing skills, divided attention). An example of adding complexity would be to have the child counting out loud in time to the metronome beat while performing mental math calculations. Both programs do a lot of work on sequential processing skills, but PACE does more with simultaneous processing.PACE uses a "loading" technique which speeds up skills acquisition and reduces the amount of repetition needed to make progress. "Loading" involves careful grading of exercises, so that the child is very appropriately challenged -- enough that he has to work to get to the next level of the exercise, but not enough so that he gets frustrated trying -- and some pushing beyond perceived limits. The pushing involves elements of cheerleading and encouragement in combination with something like the metronome, which "pushes" a little faster speed than one might be comfortable with. Loading introduces a slight level of discomfort, as we all will work a little harder to eliminate discomfort and get comfortable again.Speaking of golf, I want to mention that Interactive Metronome developed originally as a training method to help golfers improve their game! This is an example of how very targeted training can reduce the need for repetition -- 15 hours of IM would probably reduce the need for practice putts dramatically for skills acquisition! It may be that a great golfer will still practice putts many more times than the average golfer, but IM offers both a short-cut.Hope this helps!Mary: Just a few questions. My son benefited from Audiblox immensely and I
: am considering to attend an Audiblox and Studiblox (Studiblox is
: for high school/adults) course so that I can also help others.
: However, since you say that PACE is better I would like to know
: why. Obviously I would like to be trained in the better of the two
: programs.: Why is PACE considered to be more intensive than Audiblox? Any person
: who uses Audiblox can make it as intensive as he or she wants. I
: started Audiblox with my son by following a very intensive
: program. We did 5 one-hour lessons per day over a period of 10
: days. His reading improved by 2.3 years in the 2-week period, and
: his comprehension went up from 60% to 90%. I followed this up by
: doing five half-hour sessions per week. We have seen tremendous
: benefits in concentration, reading, spelling, handwriting, math,
: memory, self-esteem. If PACE is more comprehensive, what more
: benefits does PACE have?: Also, I would like to know what PACE uses as an alternative to
: repetition. I understand that, according to the latest
: neurological research, repetition is important in the wiring of
: the brain. Without repetition key connections or synapses between
: brain cells cannot be formed. The great golfer can only win
: tournaments because he had spent hours and hours practicing his
: putts over and over. I’m sure that not all children enjoy
: repetition. However, I think it is a small price to pay for the
: advantage of being good at something. But one can hardly keep up
: with new discoveries these days. Thus, if PACE does not use
: repetition to form connections or synapses between the brain
: cells, how then does it wire the brain?

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
Posts: 69138

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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

EMAILNOTICES>noPASSWORD>aaRFukf1forHkThank you, Mary, for responding.Before my son and I embarked on Audiblox I did some research on its short-term and long-term gains. I learned that if one does a half-hour lesson per day five days per week one can expect to see visible results in anything between three weeks to three months. By following an intensive course, as we did, one can speed up the results. If there is a language delay it may take longer, and also if the child’s IQ is low. With a child with low IQ more time is necessary in order to help the child to catch up.However, what made me decide on Audiblox is not the short-term gains, but the long-term ones. It is not a quick-fix, but if one sticks to the program for long enough (the average seems to be about a year), the child is pushed ahead far enough so that he can overcome his problems completely and never fall behind again.Another long-term benefit is that it is a tool to help prepare a child for the world of work, to teach him to persevere, to attach value to the end product, and to have a sense of responsibility. We could see the improvement in my son. Just to mention two examples, before Audiblox he always used to be late, now he is always on time; his room is now tidy, whereas before it used to be rather untidy.I believe that learning is to the child what working is to the adult. A parent has to make his child emotionally receptive for learning, so that he will also be emotionally receptive to the world of work when he reaches adulthood. If one teaches a child that learning and fun are synonymous, the chances are that he won’t be able to cope in the labor market one day. Every job contains aspects that are not enjoyable, that one has to do whether one likes them or not. In the book “The Myth of ADHD and other Learning Disabilities, Parenting without Ritalin” a true story is told to illustrate the destructive results when a child is brought under the impression that learning is only fun. It is told that when the children graduated from “Canaan” - the name used to refer to a school where the main mission was to make learning fun - the shock of real life was too great and as a result many of them spent time in mental institutions. One even committed suicide. Also, if one gives up on something when the child balks, one is not teaching him to persevere; one creates the expectation that it will be the same in the work situation one day.Linda, my child is now 12. He was 11 when we started. Yes, Studiblox would have been better for a teenager but it is not yet available as a home program. One has to attend a training course. That is why we followed the Audiblox home program.I believe there are between 50 and 60 Audiblox/Studiblox exercises. Some of them have many variations. The home program has been simplified, so that it will be suitable for parents to use at home. Once I have completed the training, which takes two weeks, I’ll be able to give tuition to children of preschool age up to adults. The classes are all done in groups, not one-to-one.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Zelda, I am in my 5th week of Audiblox with my 8 yr old son. Can you tell me a bit more about your son's learning problems, specifically what types of LD he had? Audiblox is such a huge time commitment, I am wondering if your son's problems were considered mild, moderate or severe.? My son is considered severely ld and I don't want to mislead him with promises as he is burned out already. Thanks for sharing your story.Thank you, Mary, for responding.: Before my son and I embarked on Audiblox I did some research on its
: short-term and long-term gains. I learned that if one does a
: half-hour lesson per day five days per week one can expect to see
: visible results in anything between three weeks to three months.
: By following an intensive course, as we did, one can speed up the
: results. If there is a language delay it may take longer, and also
: if the child’s IQ is low. With a child with low IQ more time is
: necessary in order to help the child to catch up.: However, what made me decide on Audiblox is not the short-term gains,
: but the long-term ones. It is not a quick-fix, but if one sticks
: to the program for long enough (the average seems to be about a
: year), the child is pushed ahead far enough so that he can
: overcome his problems completely and never fall behind again.: Another long-term benefit is that it is a tool to help prepare a
: child for the world of work, to teach him to persevere, to attach
: value to the end product, and to have a sense of responsibility.
: We could see the improvement in my son. Just to mention two
: examples, before Audiblox he always used to be late, now he is
: always on time; his room is now tidy, whereas before it used to be
: rather untidy.: I believe that learning is to the child what working is to the adult.
: A parent has to make his child emotionally receptive for learning,
: so that he will also be emotionally receptive to the world of work
: when he reaches adulthood. If one teaches a child that learning
: and fun are synonymous, the chances are that he won’t be able to
: cope in the labor market one day. Every job contains aspects that
: are not enjoyable, that one has to do whether one likes them or
: not. In the book “The Myth of ADHD and other Learning
: Disabilities, Parenting without Ritalin” a true story is told to
: illustrate the destructive results when a child is brought under
: the impression that learning is only fun. It is told that when the
: children graduated from “Canaan” - the name used to refer to a
: school where the main mission was to make learning fun - the shock
: of real life was too great and as a result many of them spent time
: in mental institutions. One even committed suicide. Also, if one
: gives up on something when the child balks, one is not teaching
: him to persevere; one creates the expectation that it will be the
: same in the work situation one day.: Linda, my child is now 12. He was 11 when we started. Yes, Studiblox
: would have been better for a teenager but it is not yet available
: as a home program. One has to attend a training course. That is
: why we followed the Audiblox home program.: I believe there are between 50 and 60 Audiblox/Studiblox exercises.
: Some of them have many variations. The home program has been
: simplified, so that it will be suitable for parents to use at
: home. Once I have completed the training, which takes two weeks,
: I’ll be able to give tuition to children of preschool age up to
: adults. The classes are all done in groups, not one-to-one.

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

Just want to mention that problems on the sensory/motor level will limit progress that can be made with any cognitive training program. Have you tested auditory processing, visual processing, and motor/sensory integration systems? Done any therapies in those areas?I am convinced my daughter would not have made dramatic gains from PACE had we not done months of vision therapy first -- because she had a major problem on the sensory/motor level with vision, and needed specific therapy to get her eyes to function correctly.Not all children have vision problems, of course. However, quite a lot of severely LD children have one or more major problems on the sensory/motor level of development. These children respond much faster to cognitive training after their sensory/motor level deficits have been addressed.Mary: Zelda, I am in my 5th week of Audiblox with my 8 yr old son. Can you
: tell me a bit more about your son's learning problems,
: specifically what types of LD he had? Audiblox is such a huge time
: commitment, I am wondering if your son's problems were considered
: mild, moderate or severe.? My son is considered severely ld and I
: don't want to mislead him with promises as he is burned out
: already. Thanks for sharing your story.

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 22, 2014
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Posted:Mar 14, 2001 12:00:01 AM

EMAILNOTICES>noPASSWORD>aaRFukf1forHkWendy,First, if you have not done this already, I think it would be a good idea if you email a detailed report of your son’s LD to Audiblox. Ask them how much time you should spend per day, more or less how much time it will take to help your son, and if a customized program would be appropriate. If you have a goal to work for time commitment becomes time investment. Then, take it step by step. I told my son it’s like eating an elephant. You can’t eat the elephant all at once. You have to eat it bit by bit.Second, ask Audiblox to send you a copy of their video. I don’t know the title since I gave it to a friend. One of the inserts on the video shows how the program is used to teach severely brain-damaged and mentally handicapped children to read. Show it to your son, and look at it yourself whenever you feel that you’re not in the mood to do the daily chores. This video was a great source of inspiration to us.My son was 4 years behind in reading, his spelling was atrocious, and he especially battled with cursive writing. Word problems were a major problem for him, since he could not take the actual numbers out of a story to place them into a sum context.: Zelda, I am in my 5th week of Audiblox with my 8 yr old son. Can you
: tell me a bit more about your son's learning problems,
: specifically what types of LD he had? Audiblox is such a huge time
: commitment, I am wondering if your son's problems were considered
: mild, moderate or severe.? My son is considered severely ld and I
: don't want to mislead him with promises as he is burned out
: already. Thanks for sharing your story.

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