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Behavior: Social Skills, Self Esteem

Social Skills program taught in schools


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
Posts: 69138
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Posted May 02, 2002 at 12:56:42 AM
Subject: Social Skills program taught in schools

I am in the process of researching the effectiveness of social skills programs in schools. We are in need of one at our school. As teachers we individually teach social development. My opinion is that this is not as effective as an in depth program of study such as math, science or social studies. What do you feel is more effective: leaving the skills development to each individual teacher or have a school wide program of study that each student must go through?
Note: My students are high needs at risk youth.
I would really like opinions of staff and if possible any research documents that show one or the other.
Thanks

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:May 13, 2002 10:28:24 PM

Find out what the kid's wont and then help them to get it. I've had A.D.D. and L.D. and, well the list goes on but the one thing that one teacher did was ASK ME WHAT I WONTED and she was the only one who did. She gave me the chance to do so much. I've written a short story about what it's like to grow up with all these things but, because I'm not a Dr. or any kind of teacher, they wont even give me the chance to get it printed.

Once you find out what the students wont then you will get the parents to back you up and things will happen. Trust me, my sister is a teacher and she knows what happends to people like me.
Best of luck!
Mike

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:May 21, 2002 4:10:33 PM

Teach it schoolwide!!! Consistency is essential. I am an ED teacher in a self-contained classroom for students with mental illness. My emphasis is social skills. We use social skills programs that use activities that meet different learning styles. One book in particular that I recommend is the ABC's of Teaching Lifeskills by Diane Carrigan and Joyce Thomas. It includes social skills, activities, and other ideas to incorporate this into curriculum. Good luck.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:May 23, 2002 11:23:08 PM

As a future education teacher, I believe that a school wide program
would be more effective. It is very important to get parental support. Find
out exactly what the children want. Focus on their strengths and using their
individual strengths to accomplish their goals. I believe that when you pinpoint
what makes a child tick, you can build his self-esteem which ultimately sets
the stage for a successful life.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:May 26, 2002 1:38:18 AM

I disagree with the statement that a schoolwide program is the answer. I don't think that the special social skills development needs of LD students can be addressed by the same program that might be used throughout the general education program. If it could, these students would already be "getting it."

As a special education teacher for the last umpteen years, and a general education teacher before that, I know that there are many activities and lessons used in general education that help students develop social skills. Sometimes they are from packaged programs, purchased and implemented schoolwide.Either way, they work well for MOST children. It seems to me that the reason that this question is raised here is because what works for MOST children is NOT what LD students need.

I'm referring to students who have trouble with basis social interactions: meeting new people, exchanging pleasantries, continuing a conversation on a topic introduced by someone else, taking turns talking (some of my students tend to excessively dominate), reading non-verbal cues, and so on. These are skills that many children learn naturally, taking cues from family members and peers, and participating in simple classroom activities. However, many of my students, LD among other disabilities, are not able to learn these skills by osmmosis or through "light" instruction.

Therefore, a schoolwide program is not the answer, at least not for the students I work with. They need something more directive, more explicit, more repetitive, and more effective at providing transferrable skills. However, if such a program exists, I have yet to find it. That is the reason I read this thread.

I'm hoping that there will be more postings, and maybe some suggestions of programs people have found effective in working with special needs populations.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:May 26, 2002 11:08:59 AM

Carol I could not agree with you more. After growinmg up with this it makes it hard to get along wiht others as it is let along puting us into another class were we are more difrent then all the rest of them. Their are so m,any thing people can do to help others with this but most people don't wont to take the time. Growing up it's parents, siblings and teachers that play a big roll in it, basicly every one we meet through out live has something to do with it. Then as we get older it's our bosses and partners. (boyfriend/girlfriens) Get "normal" person on a subjuct that they know alot about and they can do well, one of us on a subject that we know about and will listen and join in but it wont be for long. Not that we don't care but thats they way we are. I'm glad to see this sight is doing well for people who can ask questions to others all oner the would.

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:Jun 21, 2002 12:49:24 AM

This is a national program that a school can institute however it chooses. I watched almost 100 6th graders sit patiently for an hour as a particular point of character was explained. Then they broke into groups to discuss how to implement it in the school. It is a remarkable program, one that all schools should try. It helps the main stream kids treat the LD kids with respect.

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Anonymous
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Posted:Jun 30, 2002 11:26:25 AM

I had that in my school. It is pretty cool. We got special awards if we helped someone who needed it. I think it's a great program. Just the fact that kids get to help other kids who are different that them or just need some help, is great!

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Anonymous
Joined Dec 20, 2014
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Posted:Jul 01, 2002 1:18:10 PM

Hi

Try the Skillstreaming Program-it is available for different ages and works school-wide or self-contained.

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