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College Prep classes, Act Test & NCAA


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Joined: Nov 03, 2005
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Posted Aug 19, 2001 at 12:41:47 AM
Subject: College Prep classes, Act Test & NCAA

My daughter has been offered a soccer scholership to a Div 1 University but because of her the lack of college prep classes for the LD she is having trouble qualifiying. My daugters school would not give her the Act test at school under special testing. They did not even know about it. I explined it to them, I even printed all the forms for them. They said they did not have a teacher to give it to her or a place to give it to her. It seems so unfair if a child needs to take it before the next National Test date. I finally found a teacher willing to give it to her on her own time when school was out.
They also did not list any of her core subjects with the NCAA clearing house.
They seem to only program LD kids to just graduate form high school. There is no encouragement to attend a four year University. She was given an algebra class that took 2 years to count as algebra 1. If she knew that she would have taken algebra in 9th grade, She is now short Geometry. I need to write a letter to the NCAA requesting a waiver for her lack of college prep classes has anybody else had any of the above problems with there high school. I need help with or any suggestions on writing this letter.

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Aug 19, 2001 6:43:56 PM

Is your daughter starting her senior year now or already a high school graduate? It is not required that the ACT or SAT be taken at the home high school. She could take the ACT at a different location if there is one within reasonable distance of your home that is familiar with administering the test with accommodations. If she is just about to start her senior year, look carefully at her schedule with the guidance counselor and see if adjustments can be made to get in classes the NCAA requests. There would also be the possibility of summer school to take a class that can't be fit in this year. If she is already a high school graduate and the NCAA won't grant a waiver, consider a year at the community college or a private prep school that has a "13th year" program so she can take the classes she needs. She won't just be playing soccer in college, she will need the more rigorous academic background to be successful in college level classes. Too many athletes never graduate and most don't get to earn a living playing on professional teams. Good luck.

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Dec 06, 2001 12:32:21 AM

I've had your problem. My son plays baseball and has has to request an eligibility waiver from the NCAA.

You can request and eligibility waiver from the eligibility clearinghouse or the school that offered your daughter the scholarship can also request an eligibility waiver for her.

As far as the testing goes, our high school said they couldn't give my son the SAT, but after they talked to the college board they found it was their responsibility to either give the test or find someone else who would (and pay them if they had to). After that they agreed to give him the SAT and the ACT without a problem.

I wouldn't waste time with the individual school if your daughter is a senior in high school, go straight to the superintendent of the school district and demand that she be tested. Unfortunately, sometimes (most of the time) you have to be the squeaky wheel to get any attention.

If you'd like help writing the letter email me at deweb@pacbell.net.

Denise Williamson

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Dec 06, 2001 7:09:28 PM

Did you know that Mass. has a waiver for all public colleges and Universities for the college boards for LD students? I wonder how the NCAA interfaces with that legislation? I am working on similar Legislation for California through my local representatives....hadn't thought about the NCAA regulations....Hmmm LL

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Dec 06, 2001 9:42:25 PM

That's interesting. Perhaps we should ask the NCAA how they deal with it. I'd be happy to contact them if you'd like.

Denise

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Anonymous
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Posted:Dec 15, 2001 6:22:13 PM

Denise, That would be great! Keep me posted! BTW, My son's high school counselor advises to just take testing cold and then deal with the disparity later.She says the numbers that you need to qualify as an athelete are very low. Geez. Lannie

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Dec 15, 2001 11:41:12 PM

Okay. I'll get to work.

I don't think it's quite as simple as your high school counselor believes though. The acceptable SAT/ACT scores are on a sliding scale. For instance, if your son has a GPA of 2.50 or above he only needs 820 on his SAT or 68 on the ACT to qualify for Division I. However, if his GPA is only 2.0 he would need 1010 on his SAT or 86 on the ACT to be a full Division I qualifier. With a GPA of 2.60 and an SAT of 780 or ACT of 64 he would only be a partial qualifier and would have to "red shirt" the first year at a Division I school. (Of course, if that were the case he could opt to attend a Division III, NAIA or JC school). Is that confusing enough for you???

You can get all of this info from the NCAA's Guide for the College-Bound Athletes. Their website is www.NCAA.org.

Denise

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Anonymous
Joined Oct 23, 2014
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Posted:Dec 18, 2001 4:12:42 PM

My son's GPA is 4.3 So what would he need? LL

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Anonymous
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Posted:Dec 18, 2001 4:50:37 PM

I'm not quite sure. The numbers I gave you were based on a 4.0 scale (meaning 4.0 is the highest [an A average]). Your son's GPA is 4.3 out of a possible how many? Perhaps we can try to convert the scale.

Denise

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Anonymous
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Posted:Dec 21, 2001 1:38:23 PM

The scale is a 5 pt. scale. ? Thanks for your help. LL

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Anonymous
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Posted:Dec 21, 2001 8:09:49 PM

I believe a 4.3 on a 5.0 scale is equivalent to a 3.3 on a 4.0 scale, so he'd only need a 68 on the ACT or 820 on the SAT to be a Division I qualifier.

Good luck.

BTW, I've contacted the NCAA and hope to hear from them soon about MASS.

Denise

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Anonymous
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Posted:Dec 28, 2001 4:18:16 PM

I received a response from the NCAA today. Their letter states in part "NCAA regulations do not provide an exception to the initial-eligibility requirements and specifically the test-score requirement for an individual who resides in a state that does not require a standardized test score (e.g., ACT or SAT). . . . students with a disability are required to meet the same initial academic-eligibility requirements as other students. However, such students may receive special accommodations for their disability to help them meet the initial academic-eligibility requirements (e'g', a nonstandard SAT or ACT). The NCAA may grant exceptions to the initial-eligibility requirements based on objective evidence that demonstrates circumstances in which the student's overall academic record warrants a waiver of these requirements."

In a nutshell, it doesn't matter whether the school requires the SAT or ACT, student-athletes planning to attend a Division I or Division II school must take the tests.

Denise

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