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LD OnLine is the leading website on learning disabilities, learning disorders and differences. Parents and teachers of learning disabled children will find authoritative guidance on attention deficit disorder, ADD / ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, dysnomia, reading difficulties, speech and related disorders.

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Back-to-School Tips for Special Education Teachers



Along with new smiling faces, a new school year brings special education teachers new IEPs, new co-teaching arrangements, new assessments to give, and more. In order to help you be as effective as you can with your new students, we've put together our top 10 list of back-to-school tips that we hope will make managing your special education program a little easier.



What's New

Processing Speed Deficits in the Classroom

Processing speed is simply the amount of time it takes to get something done. When a student has slow processing speed, many academic tasks can take them longer than the average student. In this article from the Landmark School, you’ll find a checklist of common signs of slow processing speed as well as effective classroom strategies to help your students be successful. Reducing anxiety and slowing the pace of the classroom are key.

What reading technology tools and supports are effective for students who struggle with reading?

Dr. Tracy Gray of the American Institutes for Research shares powerful ways to help you become an informed consumer of technology tools and resources, including TechMatrix and PowerUp WHAT WORKS.

Back-to-School Tips for Parents of Children with Special Needs

A new school year means a new grade, new teachers, new goals, and maybe even a new school! In order to help you and your child with special needs be as successful as you can be, we've put together a list of eight helpful back-to-school tips that we hope will make the transition into a new school year a little easier for you and your child.

Today's News

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Today's Blog

"Aiming for Access" with June Behrmann

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More Highlights

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Executive Functioning Issues

Executive functioning issues can make learning difficult. Kids may have trouble planning, managing time and organizing. Fortunately, there are classroom accommodations that can help them stay on top of their work. From our partner, Understood.

Booklist: Am I the Only One with LD?

Coping with your learning disability is tough, but you don't have to go it alone. Read on and learn about how other kids are able to focus on the positive and recognize the great things about being themselves.

Calling All Writers! Enter the “Story of the Year” Contest

Story Shares kicks off the 2016 Relevant Reads Story of the Year Contest on 8/23. This is an opportunity to have your work not only published in digital and print form, but to get it before an established audience that currently spans 44 states and 26 countries. This global community is made up of struggling teen and young adult readers who need your stories to inspire a love of literacy. We know that words can have a strong impact, and we’re sure you do too. Get writing and join the movement today! Visit Story Shares for details!

Back-to-School Countdown: A 4-Week Plan to Get Ready

Start the new school year off right! There’s a lot going on—and a lot to keep track of. Download this one-month planner, which has daily tips to get your child with learning and attention issues ready for going back to school. From our partner, Understood.org.

Contributions From You

The Carp

Today's Artist

The Carp, by Tyler, age 10

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Today's First Person Essay

Boreas by Nicole Drumheller Gargus

"Your daughter may never learn to read," I remember hearing a teacher say to my Mom as I waited outside. "Does she know I can hear her?"

Share your story >>