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About Stephen... and Fresh Starts

The promise of a successful year is the hope of every student and teacher. Educator Brenda Dyck shares the story of Stephen and ponders the importance of offering a fresh start to every student who enters her classroom.

Achieving Good Outcomes in Students with Learning Disabilities

A long line of research in psychology has focused on the concepts of risk and resilience. This work studies youngsters who are at risk for a variety of reasons — including poverty, developmental problems, or family instability — and the factors that seem to enable some at-risk children to do well in the face of adversity. More recently, a number of researchers have begun to apply the risk-and-resilience framework to learning disabilities. Specifically, what kinds of factors promote good outcomes in students with LD?

Addressing Student Problem Behavior

For years, educators have known that behavior difficulties can keep students from progressing properly in school. Laws today require educators to not only notice these difficulties, but take action. This article guides IEP team members through the necessary steps to develop a functional behavioral assessment and an appropriate behavior intervention plan. It is important to determine why the students are acting the way they do.

ADHD: Same Label, Different Settings

My overall approach in solving behavioral problems is crystallized in the title of a small book I wrote for School-Age Notes in 1995, Discipline in School-Age Care: Control the Climate, Not the Children. In it, I asked providers to think about an essential question: Do the behavior problems we see “live” within certain children and will they inevitably act out these unacceptable behaviors once they enter our space? Or do they “come alive” in our environments?

Advice to Kids with Learning or Social Problems About Siblings

Does your child with social skills difficulties have trouble with their brothers and sisters? Read them this advice which is written just for them! And then read the section for you, the parent. Richard Lavoie gives powerful advice on how all people in the family can get along.

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